Line Vac Solution For Fiberglass Application

150200

Recently, I worked through a project with an end user in the UAE in need of a more viable material transfer system. As a manufacturer of fiberglass liners, they developed a need to convey a mixture with properties similar to cement approximately 10’ vertically. At the end of this conveying distance is a hopper, situated atop a machine used to mix the compound needed for production.

Presently the material is transferred from a small storage silo to the hopper by hand, but such a setup has proven to be insufficient and time consuming. After working with the end user to determine the bulk density of the material and the required conveyance rate, it became apparent that a single Line Vac would not have sufficient transfer capabilities to keep up with the demand. However, if two Line Vacs could be run in parallel, our solution became much more feasible.

By installing two 150200 Line Vacs to move the material, the end user is expecting to meet the needs of production, and to transfer the material into the hopper at a more productive and efficient rate. In this application the need is for non-continuous material transfer at a high rate, so the parallel Heavy Duty Line Vacs provided a perfect solution.

EXAIR products and staff are in place to provide solutions. If you have an application problem, contact an EXAIR Application Engineer.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXARI_LE

OSHA Compliance? We Got That.

OSHA Standard # 1910.242(b)

Compressed air used for cleaning. Compressed air shall not be used for cleaning purposes except where reduced to less than 30 p.s.i. and then only with effective chip guarding and personal protective equipment.

We get calls on a regular basis from folks, looking for products that will provide an effective flow of air for cleaning, blow off, drying, etc., but with the supply pressure turned down to less than 30psig, like OSHA requires. When you limit yourself to that low of a supply pressure, though, you’re simply not going to get the volume flow rate or air flow velocity to be successful.

You don’t have to limit yourself to that pressure at all, however…they’ve also published documentation that further explains that this limit applies to the “nozzle pressure,” or, the static pressure that would exist due to the dynamic flow, if dead-ending were to occur.  That means that if the nozzle’s outlet(s) were completely obstructed (dead-ended), the static pressure, if it were greater than 30psig, would be great enough to break the skin and cause a grave and potentially life-threatening condition, known as an air embolism. Of course, if the nozzle’s outlet(s) can’t be completely obstructed, then the static pressure realized at whatever portion IS obstructed will be much lower, and therefore, safe & compliant.

Untitled This is where EXAIR’s Super Air Nozzles “earn their stripes” – by design, they cannot be dead-ended. It’s not the ONLY design that can’t be dead-ended, but it IS the most efficient …we’ve tested a good many of the others in our Efficiency Lab, and have proved this time after time.

Speaking of OSHA compliance, most of our Super Air Nozzles also meets OSHA’s standard 1910.95(a) for Maximum Allowable Noise Exposure. Only our largest ones (3/4” NPT and up) exceed the 90 dBA limit for 8 hour continuous exposure, so hearing protection is necessary, but they’re still considerably quieter than the same sized open-end pipe blow off. OSHA Noise Level Back to that last part of 1910.242(b); the part about effective chip guarding: EXAIR’s Precision, Soft Grip, and Heavy Duty Safety Air Guns are all available with clear polycarbonate Chip Shields. They’re all in stock, available for same-day shipment; same as any other EXAIR catalog product. 1210-6cs If you’d like to know more about how EXAIR products can help you achieve OSHA compliance in regard to your use of compressed air, give us a call. We’re eager to help!

 

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
www.exair.com
twitter.com/exair_rb
www.facebook.com/exair

If Only I Had A Line Vac When I Was A Kid

I read an article earlier this week talking about the types of toys you played with as a child and what your career lead to.  Then I got to thinking, what if I had some EXAIR products and an air compressor when I was a kid?  What kind of madness could ensue?

hot wheels

The first item that came to mind for me was using a Line Vac.  This would not only be used to propel Hot Wheels a record breaking speeds into the loop of death or see how many full size cars the scaled car can jump.   Also what happens to a full size car when you launch a small die cast car into it?   Needless to say that is not all the ideas I have had for taking the orange track to the next level.

G.-I.-Joe-Group-Shot

In case cars weren’t your thing, a Line Vac would be great to launch a parachute assault using your favorite G.I. Joe with a parachute, not to mention go quite higher than I could ever through it.  It could also help launch zip lines or remove excavated dirt out of bunkers.

When I was a child, I didn’t know what compressed air or an air compressor was other than that my dad used one to inflate bike tires.   Now, I work around compressed air every single day and I make sure to introduce my girls to it whenever possible,  especially how to use compressed air safe.

The point is, a lot of the toys I played with as a child kept me thinking about mechanical ways to do things and thus I ended up with a degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology.  Hopefully by introducing kids today to our products and the many uses they will help perpetuate the design cycles of Intelligent Compressed Air Products.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

 

EXAIR’s Cabinet Cooler® Systems Withstand Every Environment

EXAIR’s second product to win Plant Engineering Magazine’s Gold Award for Product of the Year is EXAIR’s Dual 316 Stainless Steel Cabinet Cooler System.

EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Systems are used continuously in some of Industry’s harshest environment to protect crowded, overheated, and expensive electronic controls from heat failures and alarms.  Dual 316 Stainless Steel Cabinet Cooler Systems provide 5,600 BTU/HR of cooling through (2) electrical knockouts and a compressed air line.  The 316 Stainless Steel NEMA 4X Cabinet Cooler Systems are UL Listed for wash down environments for food service and pharmaceutical application.

Fans, air conditioners, and heat exchanges use ambient air and are susceptible to failure from dusty environments when the filters clog or mechanical components fail.  With no refrigerant, motors, or bearings, Cabinet Cooler Systems require no maintenance and can run for years or decades. Cabinet Cooler Systems prevent downtime on the most critical components in your facility.

These coolers are used to protect the most sensitive electrical components in the United States.  A customer disposes of chemical weapons and monitors the exhaust gases of their facility with electronic components mounted to the outside of the smoke stack. This enclosure is exposed to the elements and the heat of the desert sun. Any failure or alarm in the equipment forces the process to shutdown.  A Stainless Steel Cabinet Cooler System protects these electrical components from overheating.

CC_Apps_4up

Stainless Steel Cabinet Cooler Systems have been used on ships, power plants, medical device manufacturing facilities, and bakeries to keep heat out of their enclosures.  They also feature an added benefit that fans, air conditioner and heat exchangers don’t.  The EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Systems apply a positive pressure to the enclosure to push out any dust that may otherwise gather inside your cabinet.  This positive pressure improves air flow and limits dust building up on electrical components.  When dust collects on components, it acts as an insulator trapping the heat against your critical controllers.  This trapped heat can lead to premature failure even with sufficient cooling inside the enclosure.

As this spring heats up and summer begins, keep the Cabinet Cooler System in mind as great solution to your over heating issues.

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer
Davewoerner@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_DW

Full Flow Air Knife Increases Airflow By 3000%

Condensor Housing

Inside of the housing of the photo above is an EXAIR Full Flow Air Knife. The housing serves as a shield to a condenser on a specially built machine for one of the Big Three U.S. auto manufacturers. The purpose of the air knife within the housing is to supplement heat removal by passing large volumes of ambient air over the condenser, thereby helping to return the gaseous fluid to a liquid state.

When compressed air was supplied to the air knife in this photo, there was very little airflow. Knowing that there was something amiss, and that an Application Engineer could offer potential solutions, the OEM called in to EXAIR.

Immediately upon seeing the photo, the root cause of the problem was evident. There was no ambient air available for the air knife to entrain. It looks like an attempt was made to open the housing *in the bent edges at the top of the housing), but it was not enough.

Removing the housing from the machine revealed the following internal installation.

Condensor Housing Internal

With such a setup, there was no entrainment of ambient air, and the total airflow was only a fraction of what it should be. Removing the current shield and fabricating an alternate design which allows ambient airflow solved the problem in this application. Compressed air use remained low, and total airflow was increased by 3000%.

EXAIR products keep compressed air use low and performance to a maximum. For help with your application, contact an EXAIR Application Engineer.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

Not Just Another Day At The Ballpark

Sunday was a fabulous day to be at the ballpark. My family scored some great seats, right behind the Reds’ dugout. I got my first (ever) foul ball at a Major League game. Notice I didn’t say “caught” – it bounced off the guy’s hand in front of us, over my oldest son’s outstretched glove, off the empty seat behind him (why those seats were empty, I have no idea), and rolled under my seat.

We also saw our first instant replay review of a play by the umpires. It took every pixel of high definition that the camera had to allow the officials to decisively rule the runner safe at first…it literally came down to how fast the first baseman closed his glove on the ball as he caught it.

Notice the Braille at the bottom.  I'm sure this has NOTHING to do with the debate about Instant Replay.

Notice the Braille at the bottom. I’m sure this has NOTHING to do with the debate about Instant Replay.

The most memorable part of the game, for me, was watching the outcome of two critical decisions by the respective team managers: In the eighth inning, Tampa Bay Rays pitcher Josh Lueke was directed to intentionally walk Reds’ slugger Jay Bruce to load the bases. Bruce had doubled in the fifth, so it wasn’t necessarily a bad call. That is, until Reds’ manager Bryan Price quickly called on Chris Heisey to pinch-hit, following Bruce. Heisey fouled off the first pitch, and then parked the second one just over the right field fence. I’ve been at the ballpark for some dramatic home runs, but that was the first time I’d witnessed a grand slam up close and personal.

To be honest, I thought for a second about skipping the game. We got the tickets at the last minute, and I already had burdens on my schedule for Sunday afternoon. In the end, I’m glad I put that other stuff off, because, years from now, I wouldn’t remember that day I mulched the flower bed, cleared the brush from the wood pile, and filed my taxes (two days early, I might add), but that was a one-of-a-kind day at the old ball game.

My mind still goes back to the intentional walk, and subsequent pinch-hitter decision that led to the grand slam…never underestimate the benefits of being able to draw from the skills of a talented team. We do that every day, here in the Application Engineering group at EXAIR. We don’t miss a chance to learn, or teach, when one of us is presented with a challenging application. If you have a need for a compressed air solution, and you ask one of us for help, know that you’re getting the experience and knowledge of the whole team. Try us.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
Web: www.exair.com
Twitter: twitter.com/exair_rb
Facebook: www.facebook.com/exair

Award Winning Compressed Air Nozzle Saves Hundreds of Dollars Annually

awards2013_1126_400wide

 

EXAIR’s 1 Inch Flat Super Air Nozzle won the Gold Award for Compressed Air from Plant Engineering in 2014. We won the award for the immense savings that our customers reap by using this nozzle to replace open blow offs. While saving compressed air, we also reduce noise level and comply with an OSHA regulation 192.242(b).  Do not leave that blow off open. It is costing you everyday in dollars; it may cost you more in OSHA fines later, and it will cost your employees hearing later.

A 1/4″ copper tube can use 33 SCFM at 80 PSIG of inlet pressure. This homemade blow off will use 1,980 standard cubic feet per hour. Typical industrial compressed air cost $0.25 per 1,000 standard cubic feet.  That 1/4 copper tube is costing you $0.50 every hour to run. Each year, one 1/4″ copper tube costs $2,970*.

The 1 inch Flat Super Air Nozzle, model 1126, uses 10.5 SCFM or 22.5 SCFM less than 1/4″ Copper tube.  Saving your company 22.5 SCFM, is the same as saving $0.34 every hour or $2,025 every year.*  Saving 22.5 SCFM also, means that your compressor system doesn’t have to work as hard.  A 5 HP compressor will put out 20 SCFM, so replacing one 1/4″ Copper Tube with a model 1126 will save you from upgrading compressor system as your company expands.

Regardless of the $2,025 you just saved by replacing the homemade blow offs with engineered nozzle, it is also an industry best practice because it can lower the noise exposure for personnel and prevent any harm from dead end pressure.  OSHA standard 29 CFR – 1910.95(a) requires that if an employee is exposed to greater than 100 dBA for 2 hours, he or she needs to wear hearing protection.  A 1/4″ copper tube will easily exceed 100 dBA.  The model 1126 will lower the noise level to 77 decibel, 13 dBA lower than the OSHA requirements for an 8 hour day.

Finally, the 1″ Flat Super Air Nozzle cannot be dead ended, which protects your employees from serious injury. In the event, that a compressed air orifice is blocked with no means of escape, air may enter the bloodstream from an open cut or wound in the skin. Compressed air must be kept below 30 PSIG to eliminate this danger when using an open pipe, tube or many commercial air nozzles. With EXAIR nozzles, pressure to the nozzle  can remain at line pressure and produce the maximum velocity and force for a successful application.

*Assuming 24 hours a day and 250 working days

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer
Davewoerner@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_DW

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 723 other followers

%d bloggers like this: