Cooling a Flue Stack with Air Amplifiers

In some cities when you look along the skyline, you see exhaust stacks bellowing out plumes of smoke. I never paid much attention to the structure except that they were tall and in some cases very wide. I received a call from a customer that had a flue stack that exhausts hot gas in their petroleum process. They had an issue with hotspots in the wall of their stack. The customer need to cool the hotspots and decided to contact EXAIR.

Flue Stack

Flue Stack

His stack had a diameter of 6 foot (1.8 meters), and the hotspots were reaching a temperature of 750 deg. F (400 deg. C). This was too hot, and it could cause premature issues with fatiguing of the structure of the stack. He wanted to reduce the temperature to 400 deg. F (204 deg. C) to keep the stack from warping or degrading. Together, we were able to create a solution using our stainless steel Adjustable Air Amplifiers.

Adjustable Air Amplifier

Adjustable Air Amplifier

The customer was able to create a stainless steel circular manifold to mount 40 pieces of the model 6032 around the circumference. This manifold ring would be mounted around the stack near the hotspot. With the high amplification ratio associated with the Air Amplifiers, it can move a large volume of cooler ambient air along the hotspot of the stack. In keeping the stack cool, he could continue operations and reduce his worry for untimely shut-downs and costly maintenance.

Whenever you have something hot and you need to cool it down, the Air Amplifiers could be the solution for you. If you would like to speak to an Application Engineer about your cooling application, you can contact us at EXAIR at 800-903-9247.


John Ball
Application Engineer
Twitter: @exair_jb


“Stack” image courtesy of paulgalbraithCreative Comment License

Need A Flange? We Can Do That!

I recently had a customer call in that was trying to boost an exhaust on a hot operation that he had in his facility.   We discussed what kind of fumes he was trying to evacuate and it appeared at face value that a High Temp Air Amplifier would be the perfect solution for his application.

A Model 121021 1-1/4" High Temp Air Amplifier directs hot air to a rotational mold cavity for uniform wall thickness of the plastic part.

A Model 121021 1-1/4″ High Temp Air Amplifier directs hot air to a rotational mold cavity for uniform wall thickness of the plastic part.

Then the words that strike fear into some manufacturers came out.  The customer asks, do you have any way to put a 4 bolt flange onto the unit so I can mount it straight into my piping system?   My response, “All I need are the dimensions of the flange you need and we will see what is possible.”  After a few further questions and verification, we had a drawing  with dimensions of a Flanged High Temp Air Amplifier.  We sent the drawing to the customer for approval, and once approved, we began to manufacture the custom product and provided it to the customer.  This unit will allow the customer to easily boost the exhaust on his operation and will bolt straight into his piping so there are no worries on his end about exhaust gas escaping.  His 500°F air temperature of the gases are of no concern to this special as it carries with it the high temperature rating of 700°F.  The pictures below show the Special – Flanged High Temp Air Amplifier.


The air inlet and side view of the Special High Temp Air Amplifier


Here you can see the low pressure side (intake) of the Special High Temp Air Amplifier.


The O.D. of the flanges was 6″ with 4 – 3/4″: bolt holes. The Bolt holes were not required to align with the opposing side.

If you think there is no way we can find a product that will fit your compressed air application, or adapt a product to fit then give us a call, you might just be surprised at what we can offer in a quick turn around.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer Manager


Formula 1 Racing Is Hot Work. Drivers Need To Keep Their Cool

On July 25th, EXAIR products received some attention from Formula 1 fans. During the qualifying runs for the Hungarian Grand Prix, EXAIR Adjustable Air Amplifiers were used by at least two different drivers to cool down during adjustments in the pits. We first saw Kimi Räikkönen aka The Ice Man cooling off with an Adjustable Air Amplifier.


Photo Courtesy of Jonathon Farmer @jonathanF420 and @F1onNBC

We also receive a photo of Fernando Alonso using an air amplifier in the same application.

Fernando Alonso

Photo Courtesy of Lee Monahan and @F1onNBC

EXAIR’s Air Amplifiers use a small amount of compressed air to produce air flows amplified 24 times the compressed air flow used.  This can create flows that reveal Formula 1 cars in speed (up to 250 MPH). Force and flow for the Adjustable Air Amplifier is changed by turning the exhaust end (with knurled lockring loose) to open or close the continuous air gap. When the air amplifier meets the flow required for your application, the knurled locking ring may be tightened to lock the flow.

We have supplied products to a number of racing teams throughout the world over the years, but we did not know exactly how they were being used. To see these two great drivers using our product one is led to believe we may be the industry standard in yet another field. For those that may not know Räikkönen won the 2007 Formula One Championship with Ferrari. Alonso has won the championship twice(2005, 2006). It is reasonable to inquire, how many others in the field are using EXAIR’s Air Amplifiers as well?

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer

Stainless Steel Adjustable Air Amplifiers Replace Blower in Exhaust Hood Application

Vent hood

EXAIR Stainless Steel Adjustable Air Amplifiers model 6034


I was working with our Indonesian distributor the other day on an interesting application in the sugar refining industry.

The application was in a sugar refining plant. As the sugar cane is cooked down, the resulting gas vapor is pulled up through a vent hood and exhausted outside the building. The customer was using a 16” diameter blower to create the needed draft to draw the vapors. The problem is that the vapors are corrosive and sticky when cold. The effect is that the blower blade becomes caked with deposits which, in turn corrode the blade and it must either be cleaned and/or replaced at frequent and regular intervals.

The customer wanted to get away from having to deal with the blower issue if they can, so they turned to our distributor for ideas on how to solve the problem using EXAIR equipment. Turns out that a cluster of (3) model 6034 4” Adjustable Air Amplifiers operating at 5 BARG input pressure are able to generate the necessary flow to replace the blower in this system.

The keys to success in the application were the fact that the Adjustable Air Amplifiers are constructed of Stainless Steel to resist the corrosive effects of the gas vapor. Also, there isn’t any deposits on the blade that need to be dealt with. While cleaning of the Air Amplifiers is recommended in this application, the maintenance interval was able to be much longer between cleanings.

In many industrial applications, blower driven or electric motor driven equipment is usually preferred in an effort to save energy. This was a good example of a case where the quality of having no moving parts was able to offset other maintenance costs that made use of a blower actually more expensive for the user.

Neal Raker, International Sales Manager


Air Amplifier is Useful as an Air Conveyor for Light Material

I had a customer that was wanting to reduce the footprint and the noise level of his machine. His equipment trimmed medical capsule shells, 40 pieces at a time. The capsule shells were dropped into a chute and transferred to another location. The capsules weighed 150 milligram each, and they had to be move 15 feet (4.5 meters) horizontally and 3.3 feet (1 meter) high. The machine contained its own air compressor and blower system. The air compressor was used to operate air cylinders and other pneumatic equipment. A 5HP blower system was used to transfer the capsules. The blower motor, ducting, and cyclone separator was very bulky and noisy. They asked me if EXAIR could supply a product that would use very little compressed air to transfer the capsules without creating excessive noise.

Adjustable Air Amplifier

Adjustable Air Amplifier

I accepted the challenge. The customer only had 12 scfm (20 M^3/hr) of compressed air that was usable. In looking at my options, I had to use a product with a large amplification ratio. (Parts of room air vs. Parts of compressed air). The best candidate was an EXAIR Air Amplifier with a 20:1 amplification ratio. The capsules are light weight, and the distance was not very far which made this application a suitable one for the Air Amplifier. I decided to do a trial test using the model 6032 stainless steel Adjustable Air Amplifier (Stainless Steel had to be used to be compliant). In my trial, I adjusted the Air Amplifier to the desired flow rate. I was able to move the capsules the complete distance. I then reduced the flow to see if I was able to complete the task. I was able to consistently mover the capsules at a compressed air flow rate of 7 scfm (12 M^3/hr).

In some situations, we can run trial tests to make sure that the product can meet the specification of the customer. This customer was able to remove the blower system, reduce the foot print of his design, and more importantly reduce the amount of noise. If you have an unknown situation and you would like for an Application Engineer to do a trial test, you can contact us here.

John Ball
Application Engineer

When The Obvious Answer, Isn’t

Certain EXAIR products are designed for specific applications. We’ll still get calls from folks who want to use them in situations different than what they’re intended. For instance:

*Reversible Drum Vacs for use with volatile liquids. Due to the very real risk of ignition, we do not specify our Industrial Vacuums for use with flammables. This is a case where we can’t help, but we do know some suppliers of suitable equipment for these situations.

*Cabinet Cooler Systems for anything but a totally enclosed electrical cabinet. Oftentimes, these alternate applications are really just in need of a reliable, consistent source of cold air, which can be more properly addressed with a Cold Gun, Adjustable Spot Cooler or Mini Cooler.

*Speaking of those particular Spot Cooling Products, we’re able to help many callers who inquire about these by simply pointing them in the direction of a Vortex Tube: they’re lightweight, compact, and with standard NPT connections for compressed air supply, cold flow, and hot exhaust, you can hook them up to darn near anything you want.


A broad range of products, each with a broad range of applications!

Like the Vortex Tubes, a good many of our products’ designs afford adaptability to a wide range of uses. I submit, for your reading pleasure, these two wildly different Line Vac applications:

*A manufacturer of electrical connector devices needed to move small parts from a mass production line to their assembly area. A Model 6084 2” Aluminum Line Vac and our 6934-20 2” Clear Reinforced PVC Conveyance Hose (20ft Length) was purchased and installed. They operate it as needed to empty the production bin and fill the assembly bin; simple as that. This is a “textbook” job for a Line Vac.

*A service company that specializes in large compressors & engines was looking for a compact & mobile device to evacuate exhaust gases. This is normally where we start talking about Air Amplifiers (and we did) but their calculations called for more suction head than the Air Amplifiers will generate. Their calculations were right, and they’re putting Model 6060 ¾” Stainless Steel Line Vacs on all their service trucks. So, a “textbook” job for an Air Amplifier was actually a better fit for the Line Vac.

And speaking of “textbook” applications that take unexpected turns, another caller needed help with a “pick and place” operation that he’d purchased a small E-Vac Vacuum Generator and Vacuum Cup for. He needed to move these small media filters, one at a time, from a stack, into their product. Try as they might, they could NOT pick up just one of these pieces from the stack, which was about 3” in diameter, and about the consistency of a coffee filter….which was exactly what I used to replicate the application in the Efficiency Lab. I couldn’t just pick one up with the E-Vac either, so I tried to just use the open suction end of a Line Vac – even with the compressed air supply valve cracked open as low as I could manage, it still wanted to pick up 2 or 3 at a time. We’ve got one other product that generates a vacuum, and, crazy as it sounds, I attempted to apply our Air Amplifier in a pick-and-place situation. And it worked: with the supply valve cracked open (it wasn’t even registering flow to the smallest division on our rotameter flow meter,) the Model 120020 ¾” Super Air Amplifier was able to consistently pick up one (and only one) coffee filter at a time. So our “textbook” job for an E-Vac was solved by an Air Amplifier.

Sometimes, what seems to be the obvious solution, isn’t. With a little discussion, and possibly experimentation, though, the right answer will generally reveal itself. If you think this might be where you’re at with your application, give us a call. I can’t wait to see what happens!

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
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Cool Job, Cool Products

I’ve got a pretty cool job. I’ve written about this before…in fact, as recently as last week, in a piece about workplace safety, and how EXAIR is all over it, all the way. Brian Farno also blogged the other day about how EXAIR recognizes, appreciates, and celebrates achievement. Like usual, actually.

So yeah; this is a pretty cool job. And, just to put that into perspective, my first “grown up” job set the bar pretty high: upon completion of Naval Nuclear Power School, I was assigned to the initial manning crew of a new construction Trident submarine. When I got there in the spring of 1987, “tha thirty-five boat,” as the future USS Pennsylvania (SSBN-735) was known, was ON the pier (not NEXT to it) and we boarded through hull cuts in Engine Room Lower Level & the Torpedo Room. For two years, we worked with shipyard personnel to install, test, & certify all ship’s systems, and then took her out in the summer of 1989 for a rigorous series of sea trials. I wish there were words capable of conveying the extent of “job satisfaction” we felt when we submerged for the first time, and the whole ocean stayed outside the boat.

I was reminded of this the other day when I saw a news account of the bow section of a submarine being transported via barge from the shipyard that fabricated this section, to the shipyard that’s assembling the boat. Here’s a video clip of one such transit, from about a year ago:

I’ve written before about how compressed air is (and isn’t) used on board a submarine at sea. Compressed air is also used, for some pretty neat stuff, in their construction & service. And EXAIR Compressed Air Products are in the mix:

*Sometimes during work on a piping system, it’s not possible to isolate a particular section with valves, so a freeze seal is applied: a collar fits around the outside of the pipe, and very cold fluid is circulated through the collar. This freezes the liquid inside the pipe, forming a “plug,” which allows you to work on the piping downstream, just the same as if you had shut a valve there. One method of doing this is with liquid nitrogen…you take a big tank of the stuff to your work site, implement all the safety precautions you need to handle pressurized liquid at -321°F (spoiler alert: it’s complicated,) make up your connections, hope they don’t leak, and activate the system. Depending on the length of the job and the size of the tank, you may need to change it out…which, again, is complicated.  And yes, I’ve done it.

It's a real shame to foul this view with a block & tackle to lower a pressurized nitrogen tank down.

It’s a real shame to foul this view with a block & tackle to lower a pressurized nitrogen tank down.

Or, like several shipyards are doing currently, you can install an EXAIR Maximum Cold Temperature Vortex Tube to the collar, run a compressed air line to it, and you can supply cold air as low as -40°F, which will freeze a plug in that pipe for as long as you keep your air compressor running.

Vortex Tube

EXAIR Vortex Tubes produce cold air, on demand, with no moving parts.

*Another application has to do not with the equipment, but the people working on it. Welding is a hot job – there’s really no way around it – and welding in tight spaces can present real issues for the folks involved. Fans and blowers can provide a good amount of ventilation, but they also take up some room, which there may not be any to spare.

Enter EXAIR Air Amplifiers – they’re compact, lightweight, and use a small amount of compressed air to blow a high flow of cooling air, right where it’s needed.

EXAIR Air Amplifiers use a small amount of compressed air to create a tremendous amount of air flow.

EXAIR Air Amplifiers use a small amount of compressed air to create a tremendous amount of air flow.

These are just a couple of examples of how a large industry – shipbuilding – is using EXAIR products to capitalize on efficiency in a challenging environment. Regardless of your situation, if you’d like to learn if EXAIR can help out, give us a call.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
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Up Ladder courtesy of Russ Bowman  Creative Commons License


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