2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle Provides Perfect Solution for Thread Cleaning

This week I worked with a customer who was wanting to remove excess fluid from a U-bolt immersing application. The U-bolts range in length from 14” to 16.5” and have (2) 7/8-14 x 2” length threaded ends. After the curing process, they were experiencing build up on the threads so they were considering using an 18” Super Air Knife. The Super Air Knife provides a high velocity, laminar sheet of airflow across the entire length of the knife, which would work well in the application and encompass the customer’s various lengths.

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One-piece construction, available in aluminum, 303ss, 316ss and PVDF, with lengths from 3″ to 108″.

After further reviewing the application, we determined that they didn’t need to blow off the entire bolt, but rather focus on removing the excess fluid from the threaded ends. Once again EXAIR had the perfect solution, our 2” Flat Super Air Nozzle! The 2” Flat Super Air Nozzle uses a patented shim design (.015” installed) to maintain a critical gap, resulting in a high velocity, forceful stream of airflow. Using the optional shim kit, the shims can be changed out to .005”, .010” or .020”, which allow you to increase or decrease the force and flow. By using a pressure regulator the customer was able to adjust the supply pressure to achieve the desired result.

2 Inch Flat

Available in zinc aluminum alloy or 316ss. Produces 22 ounces of force when operating at 80 PSIG.

EXAIR offers a wide variety of Intelligent Compressed Air Products for various industrial applications. To discuss a specific application or help with selecting the correct product, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

Identifying Reversible Drum Vac or High Lift Reversible Drum Vac

This summer we rolled out a new High Lift Reversible Drum Vac. Today, I received a phone call trying to figure out what Drum Vac the customer had. This led me to write a blog, “How can you tell the difference between a Reversible Drum Vac and a High Lift Reversible Drum Vac?”

The first identifier on the High Lift Reversible Drum Vac is the blue and black label attached to the muffler (pictured below), the label on our standard Reversible Drum Vac is silver and blue.

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High Lift Reversible Drum Vac Label

As time goes on the label may disappear from these rugged units after years of use. Our engineering team has had some forethought in this area, and we created a physical difference in the units that will not be removed, edited, or worn away. To confirm the identity of your Reversible Drum Vac, unscrew the body of the Reversible Drum Vac from muffler.

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High Lift Reversible Drum Vac (Left) Reversible Drum Vac (Right)

The High Lift Reversible Drum Vac will have a groove machined into the plug of the body. The Standard Reversible Drum Vac will be a smooth finish.

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The circled plug has the groove machined in it to identify the High Lift model.

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Close up showing machined groove

 

The High Lift Reversible Drum Vac doubles the lift of a Standard Reversible Drum Vac, which makes it great for any below grade liquid cleaning operations. The additional vacuum strength of the High Lift Reversible Drum Vac can be used to move viscous materials. Sludge, vegetable oil, and heavy motor oil can now be lifted from a coolant sump or trap at heights up to 15′ vertically. On top of this extra lifting capacity it features the same benefits as the Reversible Drum Vac. With no moving parts to wear out and no electricity required, it can operate safely and effectively for years.

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer
DaveWoerner@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_DW

 

Heavy Duty HEPA Vac Reduces Dust When Vacuuming

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EXAIR Heavy Duty HEPA Vacuum Systems

When selecting the proper EXAIR vacuum system for an application, several details are considered by our Application Engineers.  For example:

Does the vacuum need to vacuum liquids or solids?

If the need is to vacuum solid material, what is the approximate size of the material pieces?

How quickly does the material need to be vacuumed?

What is the compressed air supply available?

Is dust a major concern?

The last question becomes more relevant with finer material, especially dust or small dirt particles.  Many applications have a need for dust control and need a vacuum system capable of maintaining low dust levels.

The EXAIR Heavy Duty HEPA Vac was designed for this exact purpose.  With a HEPA filter that is tested in strict accordance to IEST-RP-CC-007 standards to provide a minimum of 99.97% filtration at the 0.3 micron level, the Heavy Duty HEPA Vac can provide an effective and highly efficient vacuuming method using only compressed air.

Fine Powder Hopper 2

Hopper used for fine powder collection

For example, in the fine dust collection hopper shown above, the hopper undergoes regular cleaning and maintenance which includes a thorough cleaning to remove any fine dust remaining in the hopper. This powder has a tendency to permeate the filtration used in most vacuums, and electrically powered units have continuously failed.

The Heavy Duty HEPA Vac is a perfect fit for this application need as it can provide adequate filtration, and it has no moving parts to wear out.

If you have a dusty or difficult vacuum application in need of a sustainable vacuum system, contact an EXAIR Application Engineer to discuss the Heavy Duty HEPA Vac.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

Birthdays, Submarines, and Static Eliminators

A dear friend is turning 50 this month, and I have no intention of making a big deal of it, considering the spectacle that her husband (who is younger than both of us) is no doubt going to make of it. I was reminded of her impending birthday when I read that Alvin is also turning 50 this year.

Even at this depth, Alvin doesn't look a day over 49.

Even at this depth, Alvin doesn’t look a day over 49.

Alvin (DSV-2) is a deep-dive submersible, built in 1964. Built to dive to depths of over 8,000 feet, Alvin has had quite a storied career:

  • 1966 – Used to locate a hydrogen bomb that was lost off the coast of Spain when a US Air Force bomber “had an accident.” The bomb was retrieved a few weeks later, without incident.
  • 1967 – On dive #202, Alvin was attacked by a swordfish, at a depth of about 2,000 feet. The swordfish became entangled, forcing an emergency surface. Upon removal, the swordfish was cooked for dinner.
  • 1968 – Alvin’s tender ship accidentally dropped Alvin when some steel cables snapped, in the middle of the ocean. Three crew members onboard at the time were able to escape, but left their lunches behind. Severe weather and the development of the required technology put off Alvin’s recovery for almost a full year. A full rehab of the vessel was slated. The fruit and sandwiches left behind were found to be well preserved, and soggy but edible.
  • 1986 – Alvin was used to find the wreckage of the Titanic. While the mission was making headlines at the time, it was actually a cover story for the highly classified “real” operation: the search for USS Scorpion (SSN-589), lost under unknown circumstances in 1968. In a remarkable stroke of good fortune, both vessels were found.

That’s all neat stuff, but I’m sure there are a few spine tingling stories we’ll never hear about a deep submergence vessel, operated by the US Navy, during the height of the Cold War. Another bit of interesting trivia, though, is who built Alvin: General Mills. That’s right, the breakfast cereal folks. Turns out, they had an electromechanical division back then that pioneered advances in packaging technology, and had previously applied some of their mechanical arms to other submersibles, leading them to successfully bid the project that Alvin was born from.

This, of course, is what engineers do. EXAIR has been making Intelligent Compressed Air Products, aimed at optimizing compressed air use, increasing safety, and lowering noise levels for over 31 years now. Along the way, we’ve added products, and added TO our products to meet other frequent needs of our customers.

Consider the Air Knife: the Air Knife had been a product for years when EXAIR developed the Ionizing Bar  and added it to the Air Knife to turn it into an efficient, quiet, and safe Static Eliminator. The Air Knife then provided good information toward development of the super efficient Super Air Knife which has become the hallmark of efficiency and performance within industry.  After years of successfully solving thousands upon thousands of static dissipation applications with the Super Air Knife, we recently added one-piece designs from 60 – 108” long which used to be a two piece construction.

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EXAIR stock SIXTEEN different lengths, from 3″ to 108″. Custom lengths are available in as little as three days.

A quick look at our complete and comprehensive line of Static Eliminator products shows that, if you’ve got a static problem – big or small – we’ve likely got a solution for it.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
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expl1874 image courtesy of NOAA Photo Library.  Creative Commons License

Taking Yourself Out Of Your Comfort Zone

During the warmer Ohio weather months, April through October, my blog posts may include information about taking my motorcycle to some road course tracks (and now even a cold month or two).  I take my bike to open track days where (mostly) amateur riders can get on a proper race course. There are people on the track for the first time and people who race professionally.   They will generally divide the riders into several groups, Novice, Intermediate or Advanced.  The control riders/coaches at the track will help you to determine what group you should ride in and then help you throughout the day.   Below is a video of a control rider that is also a professional rider at Mid Ohio Sports Car Course.  (Don’t mind the music, it’s not my cup of tea either.)

For the novice group there are classes after each session, as well as skills practiced in every session.  This is to help teach the beginning track rider that the same habits you use on the street are not meant for the track, as well as how to be as safe as possible while being on the track.  This is the most watched and controlled group due to the fact it generally has the most riders and they are all the newest to the track.

For intermediate group there are optional classes and you just run your own pace.  They step up the skill level by not enforcing you to focus on a skill during each session or requiring you to go to a class after each session of the day.  The pace is considerably faster than novice and the only ways to get instruction are to either ask a control rider for it or if they see something to help you with they will generally stop you and coach you on how to do it better.

The final group is advanced, or race class.  This has the same elements as a professional race minus the grid at start-up.   There aren’t really any passing rules and the control riders are mainly all professional racers or former racers who can still make your head spin as they fly past you.  Similar to the intermediate group the only way you will get help is to ask for it.

For the past two years I have been running in the intermediate group and it is a serious meat grinder.  You will have people in there that are fast enough to be in advanced group, but are too scared.  As well as having people who let their ego and pride tell them they don’t need to learn anything from a novice class and should really be in novice learning as much as they can.  I stayed in Novice for over the first year of track riding that I had done.   Some people choose to never leave the novice group because that is exactly where they are comfortable.  They don’t want to worry about the other classes and are perfectly fine with not even being the fastest person in Novice.  This is perfectly acceptable for some, but I had to push myself out of my comfort zone in order to really enjoy the entire experience.  Even though I have been to the track several times now I am always out of my comfort zone in intermediate because there are always new people showing up and you never know when you will running with a group that should be racing, or a group that should be getting coached in novice.

Here at EXAIR we have customers that could fit into each of these groups also.   The customer who doesn’t know what an engineered solution is and doesn’t understand the cost of compressed air.  The intermediate user who has used some of our products in the past but is encountering new issues and knows that we can help lead them in the right direction.  As well as the advanced users who know exactly what they need and sometimes even request a special unit to fit their exact needs.

No matter the case, we can help as well as coach even the most advanced users of our products on how to use compressed air better.  If you are reading this and you don’t know the difference between a Super Air Nozzle and an open pipe, then give us a call.  We will help teach you the differences as well as make sure you understand the need for engineered solutions on your compressed air system.  It may be out of your comfort zone for the first few calls but we will make sure you get to the level you want to be so you get back into your comfort zone.

Brian Farno
Advanced Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

 

Long Super Air Knife Dries Cast Acrylic Sheets

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I have a customer who works for a company that produces plain, acrylic sheets which are used to produce various products used in high end bathrooms. Generally, those products are bathtubs, shower surrounds, floor pans, etc.

Our customer produces the flat sheet which is produced by pouring a liquid resin between two glass sheets which is then cured to a solid phase. Once the glass molding material has been stripped away, the edges are finished and the sheet is washed and dried.

The drying part is where EXAIR 84” Long Super Air Knife comes into play. The customer’s sheet is two meters wide and so the 84” Super Air Knife provides a continuous curtain of air across the surface of the acrylic sheet to drive the rinse water off the sides and edges. Once dried, our customer lays a protective sheet of heavy paper between the sheets of acrylic to keep the surfaces from being scratched or otherwise blemished from rubbing during transport.

Prior to moving to the Super Air Knife for this production, the customer was using a series of 40 pieces of a flat, plastic, two inch wide, air nozzle made by a company who specializes in water nozzles. The nozzles themselves were designed to consume 24 SCFM @ 80 PSIG each. The customer had these mounted to a 1” pipe that was hung above the acrylic sheet. The problem was that these nozzles used so much air that they could barely keep 30 PSIG on the header pipe supplying them due to pressure drop in their system and the noise level was up over 90 dB. The result, poor blow off performance. The estimate for their air usage was in the range of 450 SCFM for this project.

After installing the 84” Super Air Knife, the customer was able to finally maintain a reasonable header pressure of 80 PSIG at the inlets to the Super Air Knife which provided for a solid and consistent blowing velocity all the way across the width of the material. The sound level was also able to drop down to a more pleasing 75 dB with implementation of the Super Air Knife. Finally, the air consumption was dropped to a more reasonable 244 SCFM for the 84 inch Super Air Knife. A 46% reduction on air usage.

If you have a wide format type of product that you are trying to cool, dry or blow debris from, consider the Long Super Air Knives. They will provide you with a forceful, even velocity across the full width of your material.

Neal Raker, Application Engineer
nealraker@exair.com

 

Acrylic_Clear_1-4_001 image courtesy of thebaumans. Creative Commons license

Video Blog: Installing a Line Vac Air Operated Conveyor

This video blog demonstrates the simplicity of installing our Line Vac Air Operated Conveyors. The Line Vac uses a small amount of compressed air to move a large volume of material over a long distance. Requiring no electricity to operate and no moving parts, the units are virtually maintenance free. To see a Line Vac in action CLICK HERE.

For help with your Line Vac application, please do not hesitate to contact an application engineer at 1-800-903-9247.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

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