EXAIR Knowledge Base is Simple to Use

Last Sunday I received a call from my grandmother asking if I could stop by because she accidentally hit a button on her satellite TV remote and now she can’t get the picture to come back. She is 89 years old, so she still has one remote for each device (TV, Satellite and DVD) because that’s how my gramps liked it.

Pile of tv remote controls

I pulled in the drive and she was standing at the front door with the remotes in hand, grinning from ear to ear. Now, I didn’t know if the grins were because her “favorite” grandson (I am sure my brother and cousin would disagree) was visiting or if it was the type of mischievous grin my son gives me when he’s done something he shouldn’t.

As she began to explain every possible little detail that may have lead to her current dilemma, I had already realized what she had done. At the top of the satellite TV remote there is a switch that you slide across to select TV, SAT, DVD, AUX and she accidentally moved the switch to SAT and turned the power off to the satellite box. So I turned everything back on and got it back to where it was just to her liking.

I decided to reprogram her satellite TV remote so she could eliminate the other remotes and just have the one to master. Her response was classic – “Oh great! Why does everything have to be so confusing? I thought you were making it simple for me? Now I only have 1 remote BUT it has 100 buttons on it!!!” I couldn’t resist laughing but it did get me thinking…. Why does the remote have to be so difficult to use?

At EXAIR we try to make it simple for our customers to find the information they are looking for. By registering on our website, EXAIR.com, you will gain access to our full CAD and PDF libraries as well as our Application and Case Study libraries. These and other useful tools can be found under the “Knowledge Base” tab at the top of the page in the black menu bar.

Knowledge Base Website

Or if you have a specific application that you would like to discuss, please contact one of our application engineers.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

Vortex Tube Cooling: One Vortex Tube, Multiple Targets, Will This Work?

VortexTubes

I had this question posed to me the other day. The customer asks, “I have three, small, enclosed spaces that are all within about five feet of each other. I’d like to put vortex tube cooling into each space. Can I do it with one vortex tube or will I have to use three of them?”

Imagine if you will, the cold air output of a single vortex tube being split three ways and ducted into each of these small chambers. While it is definitely technically possible to do, it isn’t always a feasible idea from the point of view of lost cooling power. Also, anytime that you can split up the effect you are trying to create whether that be cooling with a Vortex Tube or blowing off a large target that has many features to it, generally it is better practice to divide the application solution up to be applied over multiple, smaller units rather than one large one.

In this customer’s case, he wanted to save money on the purchase of multiple vortex tubes by purchasing one model 3230 vortex tube and plumbing the cold air output to his three cooling chambers. The problem is that the ambient temperature outside the boxes is rather hot and also contains high humidity. How exactly is this a problem?  You might ask. The problem is in all of the heat lost in cooling down the cold air distribution pipe (the pipe, hose or tube delivering the cold air into the chambers) that lies outside each box. That results in a net temperature gain (higher temperature) of the cold air you are trying to use for cooling the chambers or enclosures. With that lost cooling power, the customer runs a risk of not having sufficient cooling power to offset the heat load in each chamber. There is also the issue of back-pressure being presented to the Vortex Tube itself from the cold air distribution piping. When subjected to back-pressure, vortex tubes will lose their cooling capacity. Finally, there is the problem of getting equal cooling power delivered to each chamber. In this case, the solution of piping cold air to each chamber would cause an un-even distribution of the cold air with the closest chamber receiving the lion’s share of the cooling, leaving the other two under-cooled.

So, what is a better way to do this?  The method I suggested to the client was to use three of our model 3208 (8 SCFM) vortex tubes, allowing for direct connection of the vortex tube cold air output to each chamber. The cold air no longer has to cool down the cold air piping thus leaving more cooling power for each chamber, there is no back-pressure issue, and finally and probably most importantly would be the total air consumed would only be 24 SCFM in this case (3 x 8 SCFM) vs. 30 SCFM with a single larger vortex tube. That is a 20% savings on compressed air use in a straight up comparison. Depending on how many hours a day the system would be used, the difference in purchase price could be made up by lower operating cost in less than a year.

Neal Raker
Application Engineer
nealraker@exair.com

Back From Vacation With a Lot of Ideas

Last week I went on the annual trip to Topsail Island, NC with my family and all of the in-laws.   The week lends plenty of time to relax, play on the beach, see a shark 10′ away from you in the water…you know the normal stuff.   I couldn’t help but think as to what my next project at home needs to be, not a “real” project at home but one I will enjoy, a hobby project if you will.   I went to my favorite place in North Carolina for some much needed relaxation and input, Saigon Sam’s, a military surplus store.  It’s really more than just a military surplus store, it has that museum feel as well due to all of the relics and weapons it showcases.

Saigon Sams

 

After seeing how a lot of military items have been re-purposed and watching a few of the old Professor videos, I have decided that my next project for home will be making a Tall Bike.  What is a tall bike you ask?  Absolutely awesome is what I would say.  The legitimate answer would be it is essentially two to three bikes welded together to form one really tall bike that is not easy to get on or off of.

2011-07-02 Bicycle Friends Tall Bike a

My hopes are that it will look something like the one pictured above.   However, due to budget constraints and my love for things that work instead of look good it may appear like the one below.

tandy

Just like here at EXAIR, even at home I am constantly thinking of new projects.   One of the newest projects that has wrapped up at EXAIR is the expansion of our Digital Flowmeter family.   These meters are now available to help you monitor your compressed air use on 1/2″ through 6″ schedule 40 iron pipe OR 3/4″ through 4″ Type L copper pipe.  The EXAIR Digital Flowmeters are simple to install and include a drill guide, drill and jig to make the process even easier. Also available is our USB Data Logger or Summing Remote Display to further the ease of collecting your compressed air use data.   If you want to compare two different lines that are the same size you can simply use a set of block off rings to clamp off the probe area while the Digital Flowmeter is in use on the other line.   This means you can easily use a single Digital Flowmeter and a few sets of block off rings to monitor all of your compressed air lines that are the same size.

dfm_sizes_pr_337w

These Digital Flowmeters are an essential first step toward understanding where your air is used, when it is at its highest use and where it is used. With this understanding, you can begin to work on making your air system more efficient and using your compressed air more effectively. Using flowmeters to monitor compressed air is the intelligent first step toward saving air and money for your company. Saving money on compressed air and operating an efficient system can help secure your competitive position now and into the future.

If you have any questions or want to know more about our Digital Flowmeter family, feel free to contact us.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
@EXAIR_BF
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com

 

The High Lift Reversible Drum Vac – New Product from EXAIR

hlrdv

Throughout the course of the last year, engineers at EXAIR have been researching and designing our latest Industrial Housekeeping vacuum.  Now, with the release of our new catalog 27, we are ready to debut the High Lift Reversible Drum Vac.

The High Lift Reversible Drum Vac (HLRDV) maintains the same performance advantages of the traditional Reversible Drum Vac – no electricity, no moving parts to wear or replace, the ability to fill a 55 gallon drum in 90 seconds (or less), two-way pump action, built-in pressure/vacuum relief, auto safety shutoff, and stainless steel construction.  And, the HLRDV adds a new capability – it can vacuum liquid vertically  up to 15 feet!

If you had the new HLRDV in your hand, you’d never know the engineering and time that went into the changes.  In fact, the only thing you may notice is the new label with a blue background as opposed to the gray label found on the RDV.  But, inside is a series of revisions and proprietary design changes that allow for an 89% increase in vacuum lift while SIMULTANEOUSLY lowering the noise level by 3 dBA

Using 43 SCFM to create 120” H2O (1,218 SLPM to create 336 mm Hg), the HLRDV is the next generation of liquid vacuums from EXAIR.  If you have an application that needs a High Lift Reversible Drum Vac, such as cleaning out a below grade coolant sump, vacuuming liquid from an underground storage tank or pit, contact an EXAIR Application Engineer.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

One Super Air Wipe doing the job of 3 Generic Air Wipes

Today, I had the opportunity to the work with a customer, who produces soft seals for the window and door industry. The soft seals are created through a multi-step process, where drying is critical for the overall quality of the product. After the extrusion of PPE (polyphenyl ethers) material, the seal is run through a water bath.  The next step is for the extruded PPE to be dried using compressed air.  After drying, a glue is applied to join the PPE soft seal to an aluminum frame.  If the PPE was not dry from the water bath, the glue would not bond the aluminum and soft seal together.

Extruded Rubber Seal

The customer wanted to replace their current compressed air drying system. The current system utilized (3) ceramic air wipes to dry off the PPE seal before the gluing process. He was relatively new to the company or the particular line, so he did not have all the history for the production line during our conversation. We were both wondering why three consecutive air wipes were used when one air wipe should be getting the job done, but we never could figure it out regardless. I pointed out that one EXAIR Super Air Wipe will clean off a variety cross sections in one pass. The old air wipes used 7.6 SCFM of compressed air for each air wipe or a total air flow of 22.8 SCFM to dry the rubber seal. Also, the old air wipes created 80 dB of noise. A correctly sized 1/2″ EXAIR Super Air Wipe would lower that noise to 75 dBA and lower the total air consumption to 13.9 SCFM.

AirWipe

By replacing three inferior ceramic wire dryers with one EXAIR model 2400 Super Air Wipe, the customer was able to get the job done better, reduce his noise level and save compressed air. EXAIR has the broadest line of problem solving compressed air products, if you have a problem area or an application you think we may be able to solve, please let us know. We are happy to assist.

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer
Davewoerner@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_DW

Going To The County Fair

My thoughts this week are full of flashing neon lights, calliope music, carnival games, food you wouldn’t think should be deep fried (but is, and it’s awesome,) 4H exhibits, and thrill rides. This of course, means the county fair starts this weekend.

Savvy fair-goers know to pick one or the other...or at least time them appropriately.

Savvy fair-goers know to pick one or the other…or at least time them appropriately.

I grew up just a few miles from the fairgrounds, so I gained an appreciation for all things fair-related at an early age. That’s why I was particularly excited about the opportunity to help a new client specify a Cabinet Cooler System a while back.

EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Systems are very popular for keeping sensitive electronic/electrical components and controls cool & dry in “less-than-optimal” environments…which was the case for this client, who designs and builds thrill rides, and whose customer for this new ride has a traveling carnival, operating primarily in the southwest United States. The high ambient heat and prevalence of sand & dust, not to mention the regular teardown, transport & setup, meant that vent fans just weren’t going to get the job done. The ride operators have enough to do getting everything operational on a tight schedule, meaning that a refrigerant-type cooler – and associated maintenance – wasn’t going to work either.

Then the designer and I reached a critical point in the conversation: EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Systems require a ready supply of compressed air…something that isn’t always easy to come by when the equipment to be cooled is as mobile as this. Good news was, the ride has pneumatically actuated motion control, so they had an on-board compressor, and could simply tap into that.

4608The calculated heat load was just under 400 BTU/hr, so I specified our Model 4808-24VDC NEMA 4 Cabinet Cooler System – 550 BTU/hr – w/Thermostat Control (24VDC). To date, it’s worked perfectly, and they’ve ordered two more, since they intend to make the Cabinet Cooler System an integral part of this equipment…a win-win-win: for us, them, and their clients.

At EXAIR, we take a great amount of pride in being a premier solutions provider for your compressed air product needs, whether it’s an application in your plant, or for OEM equipment that you’re building. We want you – and your clients – to get the most out of their compressed air usage. Give us a call and find out how an EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air Product can help you do just that.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
(513)671-3322 local
(800)923-9247 toll free
(513)671-3363 fax
Visit us on the web: exair.com
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EXAIR Web Site Feature: Air Data

 compressed air

Many times when we are working with customers we’re not always using the same units of measure that they are to describe pressure, force, flow or even temperature. And so, in order to help keep us and our customers all on the same page, we have developed some useful tools within the Knowledge Base section of our web site called Air Data.

The Air Data pages include links to pressure conversions, flow conversions, force conversions and heat conversions. We also explain in detail how to calculate air consumption and the differences between the various types of metal and non-metal piping systems that can be used in industry.

Finally, we have available various tables that describe the amount of expected pressure drop that can be expected through a pipe when various input pressures and flows are considered.

Overall, there is a lot of useful information in this part of our web site to help with compressed air system design and determining requirements for various types of end use products, like ours. We encourage everyone to check it out.

Neal Raker, Application Engineer
nealraker@exair.com

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