Video Blog: Changing Shims in Flat Super Air Nozzles

A brief video explaining just a few of the benefits to utilizing the EXAIR Flat Super Air Nozzles and how to change the shims which change the force and volume of flow out of the nozzle. Our shims and the adjustable air gap mean you can increase or decrease the volume of air flow and force without adjusting the inlet air pressure.

 

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Can We Help Identify Your Existing EXAIR Product? – Yes.

From time to time we have customers call in and say “We have one of your products and need another. But we installed it so long ago that we no longer have the paperwork to know which model we bought.” That’s a great thing to hear in a way. Our products have outlasted their filing system, and not only that, but now we have potential to solve another problem for the same customer.

When this happens, we can sift through our files to find out which model was purchased, or if the original purchase was made through a third party, we can determine the model number in other ways. We can use the dimensions, material of construction, description over the phone, or a photo emailed to an Application Engineer such as the one below.

Cabinet Cooler

But, the needs of the application don’t end there. We may be able to pinpoint the model number of the device currently in use, but we also need to confirm that this model will be suitable for the new application. For the end user that sent in the photo above, this meant the completion of a Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide for new heat load calculation.

What we determine in many cases is that the new application has specific needs which dictate the use of a product with different attributes (in this case a different Btu/Hr rating on a Cabinet Cooler). Whether it is because of heat load, ambient temperature concerns, required material, or any other variable, we are sure to provide the most suitable solution.

As spring gains momentum and warmer months are to come, it may be time to consider an EXAIR Cabinet Cooler solution for an overheating electrical panel in your facility. Contact an EXAIR Application Engineer for help calculating heat load and choosing the right system.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

The Professor’s Game Show!

Professor Penurious is up to something new.  I think he has been watching way too much daytime television.  Take a look and let us know if we need to limit his TV time.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
RussBowman@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_RB

Dear Joe…….

IMG_2082

Well, Friday, March 28, 2014 marked the end of an era here at EXAIR.  It was the official last day of Joe Panfalone, @EXAIR_JP, #DearJoe.  I know Joe has blogged about his retirement, but in case you didn’t know, he has been with EXAIR for 19 years straight.   That is almost longer than Professor Penurious’ Co-Op has been alive.

When I first started here at EXAIR four years ago Joe would always tell me, just remember kid, I voted for you.  The trick is he wouldn’t say whether he voted to hire me or not to hire me, just that he voted.   I have a feeling that I was to Joe, like Dennis the Menace was to Mr. Wilson.

No matter what the question or what he was doing, I wanted to know.  Joe was more than willing to tolerate all the questions, too. It’s almost like he has had kids before and that his patience has been tried before.  No matter what would happen, he would just keep going back to the fact that he voted for me.

Joe hasn’t only taught me a lot about applications, theory behind product, and how to skirt around HR, he has taught me how to be a better manager, not to sweat the small stuff, and that when you find something good you better hold on to it for dear life.

One of the many things Joe is known for around here is his extensive palate; in other words, he’ll eat anything.  Even my wife knows that if we have some leftovers or cake that we don’t want to eat ourselves, just send it in and Joe will eat it.  He even returns Tupperware clean as a whistle with a note saying “More Please”.

IMG_2080

The fact is, I am extremely excited to see Joe move on to the next chapter of his life.   I can only hope that it will be better than he has made all of ours.

One last thing, Joe did make the mistake of promising to meet up this Spring / Summer and help me teach my oldest daughter how to fish.  (Little does he know he’ll pretty much have to teach me, too!)

 

Thanks for everything Joe!

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

How can you protect people that don’t protect themselves?

My sister-in-law and my nephews are traveling from Columbus to Cincinnati for a visit this weekend. My nephews are 18 months and 3 years old, and they will find any sharp, fragile, or flammable object within walking, crawling or climbing distance. Of course they don’t consider these things dangerous. All they see are fun new toys. Yesterday, I battened down the hatches for the nephew hurricane that will be barreling down Interstate 71 this weekend, and there were more dangerous or scary items in the house that the nephews will want to use than I could hide.

At EXAIR, we strive to provide products that intelligently use compressed air, but everyday we have customers who are using compressed air in unsafe manner. We try to educate many of our customers and the industry as whole of the dangers and that can be associated with compressed air. The chief concern is that compressed air may cause an embolism by forcing air into the bloodstream through a break in the skin or body opening. Because of this risk, OSHA has laid down several rules for using compressed air for cleaning purposes inside the work place. To quote the OSHA Instruction STD 1-13.1, “The requirements for dynamic flow are such that in the case when dead ending occurs a static pressure at the main orifice shall not exceed 30 psi. This requirement is necessary in order to prevent a back pressure buildup in case the nozzle is obstructed or dead ended.

An open pipe used for cleaning violates this rule. Yet everyday I speak to a customer who are using open pipes to remove chips, dust or water from parts. If a employees hand is trapped against the open tube, serious injury will result. EXAIR’s Super Air Nozzles are designed with multiple openings and fins to protect those openings, so that air always has a path to escape.

 

Nozzle Lineup

 

The other safety concern with an open pipe is the noise level.  Open pipes can produce noise levels over 100 dBA which violates OSHA’s standard for maximum Allowable Noise Exposure for even 2 hours per day.  EXAIR Super Air Nozzles will reduce noise levels to create a safer more productive work environment.

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer
Davewoerner@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_DW

 

When Is A Half Inch Not A Half Inch? When It’s Half Inch Pipe, Of Course!

People have been using pipe to transport fluids for thousands of years. Archeologists have discovered evidence that the Chinese were using pipes made of reeds for irrigation as early as 2,000 B.C. Lead pipe began to supplement, and eventually replace, the Roman aqueducts in the first century A.D. In the early 1800’s, someone got the idea to use gas burning lamps to light city streets, and, over the next few years, men like James Russell and Cornelius Whitehouse came up with better and better methods of mass producing metal tubing and pipes.

Over the course of the 19th Century and the Industrial Revolution, iron pipe came to be manufactured in standard sizes, which were called out by the inside diameter of the pipe. ¼” pipe had a ¼” ID, ½” pipe had a ½” ID, ¾” pipe had a ¾” ID, etc. Iron pipe could be found in any facility that needed to move a gas or a liquid: factories, power generating stations, chemical plants…you name it.

As engineers and metallurgists came up with new ways to produce pipe, technological advances led to the ability to decrease the wall thickness and still maintain high structural integrity. This was a HUGE improvement: not only could piping manufacturers make more pipe with less material, bringing down the cost, it was also lighter in weight, making it easier to transport, handle, and install. Because of the massive amount of existing piping already in place, it made sense to keep the outside diameter the same, so that all the fittings would match when these facilities went to replace worn out or damaged pipe. So, the inside diameter was increased. That’s why, today, ¼” pipe has a 0.36” ID, ½” pipe has a 0.62” ID, ¾” pipe has a 0.82” ID, etc. Lower cost, lighter weight, more flow capacity…it’s all good, right?

Well, yes, but sometimes, it can lead to confusion, especially when we’re talking about properly sized compressed air lines. See, we know how much compressed air will flow through certain sized pipes of specific lengths. The Installation & Operation Instructions for all of our products contain recommended infeed pipe sizes to ensure sufficient air flow. Keep in mind, these are Schedule 40 pipe sizes, and should not be confused with hose or tubing sizes, which usually report the outside diameter but could also report the inside diameter, depending on the source.

Consider this example: you want to install an 6” Super Air Knife in a location 10 feet from the compressed air header. Following the “Infeed Pipe Size Length of Run” column (10’) down, we see that this will require a ¼” SCH40 pipe, which has an ID of 0.36”. If you want to use hose or tubing to supply it, that’s fine – it’ll have to have a 3/8” ID, though, or you’re going to risk “starving” the Air Knife for air. If you choose a 3/8″ tube remember that dimension is usually referring to the outside diameter of the tube and automatically means your inside diameter is smaller than we would recommend.

SuperAirKnifeInfeedPipe

If you’d like to learn more, it’s actually been a pretty popular blog topic as well:

The Importance of Proper Compressed Air Supply Lines

Video Blog: Proper Supply Plumbing For Compressed Air Products

Top 6 Compressed Air Plumbing Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

…and that’s just to name a few.  If you have specific questions about how to properly supply your EXAIR product(s), you can give us a call – we’re eager to help!

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
(513)671-3322 local
(800)923-9247 toll free
(513)671-3363 fax
Web: www.exair.com
Twitter: twitter.com/exair_rb
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

Compressed Air Quality

In a recent conversation with an end user, we scratched the surface on compressed air quality.  In this case, the customer wanted to maintain their Super Air Knives as well as possible through preventative maintenance, and through supplying sufficient quality compressed air.  At present, they were unsure of the required compressed air quality for our products, and called EXAIR to seek direction.

When it comes to compressed air quality, ISO 8573 provides detailed standards on air quality classes for various levels of contaminants.  At times you may see a three digit code describing a filter, and this code refers to particulate, moisture, and lubricant classes of the filter (specified in that order).  The classes used to define these codes can be found below.

Compressed Air Quality ClassesISO 8573-1 Compressed Air Quality Classes

For example, if the application in question requires process air for assembly in a clean room with low particulate, low moisture, and low oil content, a filter rating of 1-1-1 would be desired.  EXAIR Automatic Drain Filter Separators are suitable to filter particulate to 5 micron, and our Oil Removal Filters are capable of trapping sub-micron particles down to 0.03 micron.  Supplying compressed air to these specifications is suitable for all EXAIR products.

Providing clean, dry compressed air is important to prevent contaminants from damaging components or manufactured products in an application.  Contaminants can enter the system at the intake of the compressor, through the compressor itself, or through the compressed air piping in the form of rust or pipe scale.

Determining the quality of air needed for an application can be done by considering the end use of the compressed air.  If the application requires plant air, there is no need to produce or maintain process air within the facility.  Compressed air quality can be tailored to the specific application at the point of use.

If you need help selecting the proper filters and compressed air conditioning equipment, contact and EXAIR Application Engineer.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

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