Safety Air Gun Improves Aluminum Extruding Machining Process

I was doing some work around the house Saturday when I heard my wife shouting out from our laundry room….”Something is wrong with our dryer. This is the 3rd time I’ve restarted it and the clothes are still wet!”. Now having been in this situation before, I knew this meant that the exhaust was probably clogged with lint (again).

See, our laundry room runs parallel to our family room and the exhaust ducting goes up and then across the laundry room, across the family room and then exhausts on the side of the house. (I would like to find the person who thought this was a good idea!). I have thought about re-routing the ducting but the only other option would be to have the exhaust on the front of the house which will “never happen” (per my wife). So I usually end up taking my vacuum and attaching as many extensions as possible to reach as much of the ducting as I can. I have tried a few other methods with no success – like taking my leaf blower and, from the outside of the house, blow the lint back towards the laundry room and into a garbage can. (hint: make SURE your wife is not in the laundry room when attempting this…. They don’t react too well when they get covered in lint!)

This made me think of an application I worked on last week with an aluminum extrusion company. The customer cuts lengths of aluminum siding from 1’ up to 10’ in length and, standing at one end of the material, are using a standard blow gun to try and blow out the chips but are unsuccessful. They reviewed our website but were still unsure what product may fit their needs best, so they gave us a call.

We discussed their application and the customer was able to email pictures. After reviewing the pictures I recommended using one of our Soft Grip Safety Air Guns with our Model # HP1125, 2” Flat High Power Super Air Nozzle and a 72” extension.  The Soft Grip Safety Air Gun is constructed of cast aluminum and includes a hook for hanging in a convenient location. The Model # HP1125, 2” High Power Flat Super Air Nozzle, produces 2.2 lbs. of force @ 80 PSIG and utilizes 37 SCFM with a sound level of 83 dBA. This would also meet or exceed the OSHA standards for safety, per Standard 1910.242(b) for 30 psi dead end pressure, and allowable noise exposure per Standard 29 CFR – 1910.95(a).

HP1230

An EXAIR model HP1230 Soft Grip Safety Air Gun

To discuss your application or help with selecting the right product, contact an application engineer.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

EXAIR At BI-MU With Italian Distributor

Lee with Magugliani team

Myself, Lee Evans, with the Magugliani team.

I had the pleasure of attending the BI-MU exhibition with our Italian distributor, Magugliani SRL, from September 30th – October 4th in Milan, Italy.  BI-MU is an exhibition dedicated to the Italian machine tool, robot, and automation industries.  And, our distributor is very keen on finding relevant applications and solving problems in these industries.

Adjustable Spot Cooler

An EXAIR Adjustable Spot Cooler w/ Single Outlet Hose Kit.

One of the most frequent applications we discussed was the use of the Adjustable Spot Cooler.  During milling operations or in lathe turning applications, considerable heat is generated when the cutting edge is applied to the work piece.  This heat can cause the metal (or other material being machined) to adhere or even weld to the cutting edge or flute of a bit.  Such a  condition presents quality control problems, and loss concerns due to machine tool downtime.

The Adjustable Spot Cooler can remove these problems from a machining application using only compressed air – no liquid.  By directing extremely cold air (as low as -30F) to the machining area, the heat is removed and the useful time of the cutting edge is in increased.  By cooling the precise area generating the heat, the Adjustable Spot Cooler can boost the productivity and quality of parts coming out of a machine.

If you have a similar application, or think an Adjustable Spot Cooler may be a positive addition to your application, contact an EXAIR Application Engineer.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

**Thanks again to the Magugliani team for a GREAT exhibition!

A Dull Knife Is A Dangerous Knife

Anyone who’s ever cooked, hunted, crafted, fished, whittled, opened a well sealed package, or sharpened a stick for roasting marshmallows knows what I mean. A dull knife requires more force to cut your material, which means that you’re using less of your muscle strength to control the blade. If you’re not sure of where the blade is going, that’s a heck of a thing to leave to chance, especially if you’re holding what you’re cutting in your other hand.

Even if (I might even say “especially if”) you don’t use a knife for cutting every day, the conventional wisdom dictates that you should keep its blade sharp. Not only is this imperative for safety reasons (see above,) but you’re going to make a MUCH higher quality cut as well.

Sharp blades result from high quality material that is professionally crafted, and expertly maintained. The cheaper the material, the easier the blade will dull. High carbon stainless steel blades cost a little more, but they’re also easier to sharpen, and they stay sharp longer. A decent stamping machine can turn out hundreds of blades an hour, but forging a single piece of metal results in a level of hardness that is much more conducive to maintaining a sharp edge. Speaking of maintaining a sharp edge, that’s going to be left up to the user. A lot of hardware stores provide sharpening services, but it’s not all that hard. Expert results can be obtained by following what the experts do, and the Boy Scouts of America have taken pride in doing stuff like this for over a hundred years now. Full disclosure: I’ve been a Scout Leader for over nine years now, so I may be biased, but I am unapologetically so. I use these tips, and my pocketknife is VERY sharp.

High quality material, professionally crafted and expertly maintained, is, of course, a successful recipe for a great many products other than knife blades. EXAIR applies these principles to every single item in our 168-page catalog of Intelligent Compressed Air® Products. Here are just a couple of examples:

*The Super Air Knife (no relation to the cutting tools discussed above) is available in a range of materials: aircraft grade aluminum, types 303 or 316 stainless steel, or PVDF. They’re engineered for maximum efficiency, minimum noise level, and manufactured to exacting quality standards.

Capture
*The Heavy Duty HEPA Vac System turns your open top drum into a powerful, high capacity, dust free, industrial vacuum. It’s made of a hardened alloy for superior abrasion resistance, and, with no moving parts, it’s virtually maintenance free.

Exair-heavy-duty-HEPA-vacuum

I could go on, but these are the two products, and the benefits they provide, that I’ve actually discussed with potential users just today. If you’d like to know more about how EXAIR products can keep the use of your compressed air sharp, effective, and safe, give me a call.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
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Vac-u-Gun Makes the Job Easier and Safer

I worked with a customer this week who was wanting to use one of our small Light Duty Line Vacs to remove plastic chips from their small machining operation. The Light Duty Line Vac  is a lesser version of our more powerful Line Vac models and provides an alternative solution for conveying smaller volumes of material over a short distance.

Light Duty Line Vac

Our family of Light Duty Line Vacs are built for use with 3/4″ to 6″ hose or pipe.

The customer is currently using an ordinary blow gun to blow out the chips onto the floor which was creating an unsafe work area. Another concern was the decrease in production, as the operator would need to stop machining, find a broom, sweep up the chips and dump them in a receptacle. To eliminate this, they were thinking that the operator could manually use the Light Duty Line Vac to vacuum the chips and convey them to the collection receptacle which was only about 5 feet away.

The Light Duty Line Vac would have worked well in the application, but since the process of vacuuming the chips would remain a manual operation, I mentioned our Model 6292 Vac-u-Gun Transfer System. The Vac-u-Gun is a hand held product, with a trigger valve built in. It is a more ergonomic and efficient solution than the Light Duty Line Vac. The Vac-u-Gun can be used as a vacuum gun, blow gun or transfer tool providing the customer with a single tool for a variety of different jobs. Utilizing only 13 SCFM @ 80 PSIG, it creates a vacuum of -29.5” H2O and produces a force of 9 ounces. By changing the orientation of the nozzle insert, the unit can be easily changed from a vacuum gun to an efficient blow gun.

Vac-u-Gun orientation

Offered in 3 different systems to cover several applications:

Vac-u-Gun Systems
By choosing the Vac-u-Gun rather than the Light Duty Line Vac, the customer was able to keep the manual operation, eliminate the unsafe working conditions, perform the job with less compressed air and improve their overall production. I was happy to assist them with the information to make the best decision.

At EXAIR, we have many different intelligent compressed air products that may fit your application. For help selecting the best option, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We are always willing to help!

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

Video Blog: Effectiveness of Filtering Your Compressed Air

The video below will give a brief demonstration on the importance of point of use filtration in order to remove unwanted material such as water, scale, particulate and oil from your compressed air stream. Point of use or end-use filtration will keep your air clean and your compressed air products running smooth.  If you have any comments or questions, please feel free to contact us.

 

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

What’s an EXAIR?

Sometimes taking customer’s phone calls remind me of an Abbott and Costello bit (but I have to be Costello). Conversations can feel a bit like twenty questions. Instead of opening with mineral, vegetable, or animal, customers call in wanting more information on an “EXAIR”.  For our brand manager and marketing department, it is a clear sign that what they are doing is working, but to me can be a bit confusing.

Before you start thinking I don’t know my product, please remember an “EXAIR” can be quite few things. We make the broadest variety of problem solving end-use compressed air products for industry which equates to many possibilities of what an “EXAIR” may be. Is it an Air Nozzle, an Air Knife, an Air Wipe, an Air Amplifier, an Atomizing Spray Nozzle, a Safety Air Gun, a Static Eliminator, a Vacuum Generator, a Line Vac, an Industrial Vacuum, a Vortex Tube, a Cold Gun, or a Cabinet Cooler?   Unfortunately, with no moving parts to wear out, our products sometimes will outlast their labels, so the customers don’t have anymore information. Then, I have to ask what the product does.

So I ask the customer, “does the EXAIR blow off, vacuum, clean, dry, cool, convey, evacuate, coat, divert, dust, float, open, lift, purge, or spray?”

And then I wait for the customer’s detailed and eloquent response…”It works”, they sometimes say. But most of the time they respond with all of the details or enough to determine what product they have. In, in the end, an “EXAIR” is generally a Cabinet Cooler or a Vortex Tube (though it may be any of the above selection) – and we won’t complain that our company name can be so closely associated with our products.

We have so many products because compressed air is so versatile and useful.  We have taken our expertise in compressed air and used it to solve numerous problems for our customers. This is not as easy, as it sounds.  First, you need to know how well our compressed air products can perform. Second, you need to know what kind of performance the customer needs to get the job done. For instance when working on a Cabinet Cooler sizing exercise: A customer has a control box that is 24″ tall by  36″ wide by 12″ deep.  This box is reaching temperatures that cause the electronics to fail. Generally, this temperature is going to be between 110 degrees Fahrenheit to 130 degrees Fahrenheit. The temperature in the plant was 95 degrees Fahrenheit, when it failed.  The customer would now like a Cabinet Cooler System to protect his enclosure from future temperature failures.

To calculate the heat load of the electronics, first we need to calculate the surface area in square feet. In the example above that would be 22 square feet. Second, we need to calculate the temperature differential between the outside and the inside of the cabinet.  The maximum temperature differential is 130 F – 95 F, which is 35 degree differential. With the temperature differential chart from our website, we can calculate the BTU/HR per square foot.

Temperature Conversion Table

For our example, it would be 13.8 BTU/HR/ft^2. Multiply this by our surface area. Our Cabinet Cooler needs to cool at least 303.6 BTU/HR. Our 4308 Cabinet Cooler System would be a good cabinet cooler for this enclosure. It can cool 550 BTU/Hr. It is rated for a NEMA 12 enclosure to prevent dust and oil from entering the cabinet.

To help the customer, you have to first ask the right questions. Most of these questions are listed on the Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide on our website. What is the internal air temperature in the cabinet? What is the ambient air temperature? Are their any fans in the cabinet? What is the NEMA rating for the Cabinet? Sometimes it is best to speak with an Application Engineer to know for sure you have your bases covered.

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer
DaveWoerner@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_DW

What Type of Compressor Is Right for EXAIR Products?

Which One

A frequent question (and rightfully so) for compressed air products is “How much compressed air does it use?”  Fortunately for EXAIR, we can provide these values with confidence, knowing the research and development, testing, and quality control that goes into the products we make.

For many applications, this question is cut and dry.  For others, particularly those that do not currently have compressed air on site, the question leads to further conversation.  One of the questions that is often asked, is “What type of compressor should we use with these products?”

While the end-use products (EXAIR products) will operate regardless of the compressor type, there are benefits and advantages to various compressor types in different applications.

For short-term or intermittent use, a reciprocating compressor can be an excellent choice.  The size and weight, maintenance requirement (relatively low), and ease of procurement make them very suitable for small demand applications.  They are also suitable for high pressures. Keep in mind that reciprocating compressors typically have higher noise levels and higher cost of compression when compared to screw compressors.

When the compressed air need is high volume, and the demand requires a continuous supply of compressed air, a rotary screw compressor can be a better choice.  Rotary screw compressors are designed for more regular use in industrial applications, are (generally) more maintenance intensive, feature partial load capability allowing to align supply and demand, and can be found in a variety of sizes. You can expect to pay more for these models than the reciprocating compressors.

From an engineering standpoint, reciprocating compressors are dynamic devices, and screw compressors are positive displacement devices.  Click here for a more in depth look at screw compressor operation.

EXAIR manufactures many, many compressed air driven devices with a concentration on solving problems, conserving compressed air and making it safe by meeting OSHA standards.  And, although we do not supply or support any specific compressor manufacturer, our Application Engineers are well versed in compressed air generation and suited to discuss those needs with our customers.

If you have a compressed air related question, contact an EXAIR Application Engineer.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

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