Why Trust EXAIR?

Bryan Peters, the President of EXAIR Corporation blogged on January 6, 2011 about trust.   Trust is a critical element to any relationship, business or personal.  There are hundreds, if not thousands, of historic quotes based around trust. Two of my favorites are below:

“Whoever is careless with truth in small matters can not be trusted in important affairs.” – Albert Einstein

And,

We firmly believe any company that operates, or tries to operate, without trustworthiness, ethics and honesty will not be around for long.  I agree this is why EXAIR has been able to thrive for 31 years and counting and shows no signs of slowing down.  There is no better part in a conversation with a customer than when you can explain to them they can trust us to help them.  If they don’t like our options then they can return any stock items within 30 days from the date of purchase with no questions asked.

In 2014 we exceeded 100,000 customers who have seen the level of honesty, ethics, and trustworthiness EXAIR provides.

This level of service is given to each and every individual that contacts us here at EXAIR, whether it is a Production Manager, an Engineer, a Maintenance Professional, a student working on a project or a do-it-yourselfer working in their garage.   Then to show just how much we trust our customers, we offer any domestic customer to call in and place an order of up to $1,500 on a purchase order without a need of credit references or a formal account setup form.  All we need is a bill to and ship to addresses, along with a contact name and phone number.   We will then honor the PO and ship the product to you like you have been one of our longest standing customers.

Through a great deal of hard work, we remain unmatched in our level of:

  • Customer service
  • Product quality
  • Product availability
  • Technical data
  • Technical support
  • International standards compliance
  • Product line expansions
  • Distributor training and support
  • Testing capabilities and services
  • Instructional videos
  • Environmental and social responsibility

EXAIR continues to grow and accepts nothing less than our customers receiving the highest level of service, product quality, and product availability.  Even if you haven’t bought anything from us – ever.

I trust EXAIR fully with my career, my personal goals, and even the well-being of my family.  I am proud to be part of something that is much more than an 8 to 5 job and will confirm this as a company concerned with much more than the bottom dollar.

One final quote for the history books:  “EXAIR is here to help, period.” – Bryan Peters, President of EXAIR Corporation.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer Manager
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

 

Image courtesy of BKCreative Commons

What Size Pipe Should I Use?

Yesterday, I had a customer with a tough application for a Standard Air Knife. The customer was quenching individual 11″ x 11″ steel plates in oil after they had been heated to over 1,200° Celsius. Following quenching, the plate is pulled out of the oil with a fair amount of excess oil still attached. This excess oil is relatively hot and could be dangerous, if it drips from the plates as they are conveyed to the next process. The oil removed from the tank is also lost, so the tank needed to be refilled regularly. This oil added up to quite a large expense every year for this company. The customer installed (2) 12″ Standard Air Knives above the oil quenching tank to blow the oil off of the plate back into the oil quenching tank as the plate is raised out of the tank and in between the two air knives.

How the Standard Air Knife Works

How the Standard Air Knife Works

The customer called to express some disappointment about the air knife performance, I asked him a few questions about his application.

Q:What pressure is supplied to the air knife?
A: 100 PSI
Q: Where are you measuring this pressure?
A: That is our shop pressure and the pressure I’m measuring at the regulator.
Q: How are you connecting the regulator to the air knife?
A: We are using 10 feet of 3/8″ ID tubing.

At this point I suspected that the problem was in the compressed air supply line. To confirm this, I asked the customer to install a pressure gauge in the unused air inlet of the air knife. This pressure gauge read only 52 PSIG. The customer had a pressure drop of 48 PSI through the 10 foot of 3/8″ tubing, fittings, and valves that connected the regulator to the air knife.  The 12 inch Standard Air Knife utilizes 41 SCFM of compressed air when fed with 80 PSIG. In order to determine what to expect for a reasonable pressure drop, you could use EXAIR’s Air Data charts. According to EXAIR’s air data chart, for 1/8″ schedule 40 iron pipe, which has around 1/4″ ID (Which is very similar to the Inside Diameter of the 3/8″ tube) at 8 SCFM of flow the line will create a 18.6 PSIG pressure drop. When you try and shove more than 8 SCFM through the 3/8″ OD (1/4″ ID) tubing, you create a higher pressure drop. In this customer’s case it created a 48 PSI drop across the air line. This 48 PSI pressure drop was caused by the supply line as well as the fittings or valves used to connect valve to the regulator. This pressure drop limited the air knife to only 52% of its performance. In an application with a viscous fluid like oil , this drop in pressure led to lower force upon the steel plate and disappointing performance.

After getting the proper plumbing in place, the pressure drop was eliminated and the the Air Knives were operating at peak performance to remove the oil from the plates.

During the course of our troubleshooting, the customer also discovered Russ Bowman’s excellent video Proper Supply Plumbing for Compressed Air Products. In the video, our customer discovered the impact both the cross sectional area and overall length of compressed air piping can have on the performance of an air operated device.

The customer wanted to use a 12″ Air Knife to blow off the oil from the plates, which is a great application for the air knife. By properly plumbing the supply of an Air Knife, the customer contained hot oil, reclaimed quenching oil for future use, and maintained a clean shop floor. This installation was well worth the time and effort of installing the air knife properly. If the customer would like, we also have a Super Air Knife which will only use 35 SCFM and could help to save more compressed air. This savings of 7 SCFM may not seem like much, but it will have a significant impact on the energy cost of running his air compressor.

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer
@EXAIR_DW
DaveWoerner@EXAIR.com

Video Blog: Changing an Air Cap on an Atomizing Spray Nozzle

This video will show you how to change an air cap on an EXAIR atomizing spray nozzle. We offer internal, external and siphon fed atomizing spray nozzles. They are generally used for coating, cleaning, dust abatement, cooling or lubricating. The air caps can be changed to alter the spray pattern.

John Ball
Application Engineer
johnball@exair.com
twitter.com/exair_jb

 

EXAIR Safety Air Guns Quickly Remove Years Of Debris From Large Building’s Ceiling

The air gun is a quintessential tool found in a variety of settings. Machinists will use them to blow chips, debris, and coolant from parts as they’re being finished. They’re commonly used for final cleanup before an item is packaged…nobody wants to open up a brand new product and find dust, dirt, or dried-up coolant spots on it. They can make a quick job of cleaning off a work bench…if you intend to sweep the floor afterwards, that is. In fact, larger air guns can even be used to “sweep” the floor.

I recently had the pleasure of assisting a user who was going completely the other way…from the floor, that is. His company had been contracted by the new owners of a rather large show facility to “rehab” the building. Before they could do anything, though, he needed to clean years and years (and years, he said) of dust, sediment, cobwebs, and other various debris, from the open rafters overhead. All 42,000 square feet of overhead. And, because of their schedule for getting the facility ready for upcoming shows, it needed to be done quickly.

After discussing the application and comparing the capabilities of our various Safety Air Gun offerings to the available compressed air supply, I recommended, and they purchased, two Model 1360-48 Heavy Duty Safety Air Guns, fitted with Model 1106 High Force Super Air Nozzles. These made short work of a big part of the job, allowing them to move quickly on to the rest of the building restoration.

If you’ve got a cleanup job…big or small…perhaps an EXAIR Safety Air Gun is the solution. We’ve got them ranging from the Model 1408SS Precision Safety Air Gun, fitted with our 1108SS Atto Super Air Nozzle (2.5 SCFM; 2.0 ounces of force,) to the Model 1218-6 Super Blast Safety Air Gun, which uses our largest High Force Super Air Nozzle, the 1120 (460 SCFM, 23 pounds of force,) and 29 models in between. We can provide them with accessories such as Chip Shields, Stay Set Hoses, Rigid Pipe Extensions, and Compressed Air Hoses, as needed. Give me a call to find out which one is right for you.

Here are just 2 of our 53 distinct models of Safety Air Guns.  I bet we've got the one you're looking for.

Here are just 2 of our 53 distinct models of Safety Air Guns. I bet we’ve got the one you’re looking for.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
Find us on the Web
Follow me on Twitter
Like us on Facebook

EXTRA! EXTRA!

I’ve always been a little hesitant to post certain personal things like “checking in” at a restaurant or letting the world know that I will be on vacation for the next 7 days, but sometimes it’s difficult to hold back when you have great news.

My wife and I are expecting our 2nd son in the beginning of April and couldn’t be happier!!! We originally decided to only tell our families, close friends and co-workers because we wanted to make sure there were no complications. While it was difficult to hold back our excitement (convince my wife to restrain herself – some people have coffee first thing in the morning, she has her news feed), over the weekend my wife made the announcement on her FB page. The amount of positive feedback was amazing. We heard from extended family, friends, former classmates and co-workers all congratulating us. We even had people offering some of their gently used baby gear, which will come in handy since we just donated most of our gear last spring.

Its a boy

“Mini NIC” due to arrive April 8th

At EXAIR, we have also use social media to get out some announcements. Whether it’s our Facebook page, Twitter feeds, Youtube channel, E-News, blogs or our press releases, we make it easy for you to stay up to date with our latest announcements or promotions. Take for example our January 12th, 2015 press release announcing our expanded Long Super Ion Air Knives, up to 108″ in single piece construction, an industry first! Or @EXAIR_BF’s latest tweet on our current promotion for our Static Eliminators.

Of course, you can always give us a call at 1-800-903-9247 too!

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

 

Stork Boy image courtesy William Arthur. Creative Commons

EXAIR NEMA 4 Cabinet Cooler Keeps Electronics on Label Verifier Machine Cool

Label Verifier cabinet cooler

Model 4725 keeps label inspection machine cool

We had been working with a client in the South East Asia region who made cans for a variety of food and beverage products. They had a problem with their label verification machine overheating due to the high ambient temperature within the plant. They are located in a tropical setting, so heat and humidity have been a problem on a variety of their equipment.

In this case though, we sent a Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide to the customer to get the necessary data to calculate the heat load that was present within the cabinet. After running the calculations, the result was the application required 1200 Btu/hr. of cooling power to keep the inside of the box at a reasonable 35° C. We could have recommended that the customer go with a thermostat controlled system, but they wanted to have a constant purge of air within the box. So, we recommended our 1700 Btu/hr., continuous operating system in NEMA type 4 (model 4725). The unit has more than enough cooling power to keep the customer’s electronics cool and on-line even through their hottest summer temperatures.

Before installation of the Cabinet Cooler System, the customer was experiencing a reject rate that was unacceptable due to false reads by the sensor system. After installation of the Cabinet Cooler System, the customer made a survey of their defects manually. Every single can that was rejected was a proper rejection.

Do you operate your production machinery in high ambient temperatures whether due to hot processes or simply hot summer days?  If so, the EXAIR Cabinet Cooler System can be a great solution for you as it was for our customer in South East Asia.

Neal Raker, International Sales Manager
nealraker@exair.com

Complying with OSHA’s Compressed Air Standard

One of the most commonly misunderstood regulations about compressed air is, how to use it safely. OSHA requires a few key features to adhere to when using compressed air to clean. Many people come to the conclusion that the supply air pressure must be reduced to below 30 psig to safely use compressed air for cleaning. This will severely limit compressed air’s effectiveness. There are other ways to use compressed air safely, before we get to that though what has OSHA published on the subject.

meets or exceeds osha

OSHA’s directive 1910.242(b) states “Compressed air shall not be used for cleaning purposes except where reduced to less than 30 PSIG and then only with effective chip guarding and personal protective equipment.” This standard is unclear in a vacuum, but in 1978 OSHA released OSHA instruction STD 01-13-0001 (which also includes acceptable methods), which gave an interpretation on what “reduce to less than 30 PSIG” means. From the interpretation, The phrase, “Reduce to less than 30 psi means that the downstream pressure of the air at the nozzle (nozzle pressure) or opening of a gun, pipe, cleaning lance, etc., used for cleaning purposes will remain at a pressure level below 30 psi for all static conditions. The requirements for dynamic flow are such that in the case when dead ending occurs a static pressure at the main orifice shall not exceed 30 psi. This requirement is necessary in order to prevent a back pressure buildup in case the nozzle is obstructed or dead ended.”

This is technical speak for a nozzle that will allow a path for air to escape in case the nozzle is dead ended. EXAIR designs all of our products with this directive in mind. Typical compressed air safety nozzles feature an open tube with a cross drilled hole at the tip. This nozzle complies with the OSHA directive as well, but typically exceeds OSHA noise exposure standards and wastes compressed air. EXAIR’s engineered nozzles are designed to reduce the noise level below OSHA standards and use compressed air efficiently. This can greatly lower the energy cost of running your compressed air system.

EXAIR Model 1210-6-CS is shown.  This model meets or exceeds OSHA Standard 1910.242(a)

EXAIR Model 1210-6-CS is shown. This model meets or exceeds OSHA Standard 1910.242(b)

Secondly, in the interpretation OSHA requires effective chip guarding to further protect operating personnel. EXAIR offers Chip Shields which can fit all of our Safety Air Guns as well as many other blow guns. This Chip Shields feature a durable polycarbonate material to deflect and stop blowing chips from being directed toward the operator. This chip shield can help meet the requirements for OSHA 1910.242(b), but each company needs to carefully identify any operators that may be in the path of blown debris when using compressed air to clean.

If you would like to discuss your current blow off devices and see what model EXAIR offers to help you meet and exceed OSHA safety standards, please contact us.

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer
@EXAIR_DW
DaveWoerner@EXAIR.com

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 13,156 other followers

%d bloggers like this: