I Love A Good Commercial

I watch an awful lot of television. I always have. I grew up in the 1970’s, and I can STILL remember the sixth sense that my friends and I seemed to possess, regarding the imminent air time of our favorite shows. We could be engaged in the most epic Friday evening whiffle ball game EVER, but a few minutes before 8pm, we all became acutely aware that The Incredible Hulk was about to come on, followed by The Dukes Of Hazzard. Throughout the week, our games might be called on account of weather or darkness, but on Fridays, they’d be called on account of Lou Ferrigno (The Hulk) and Catherine Bach (Daisy Duke.) It’s entirely likely that this was triggered by the subtle reinforcement of having viewed a short advertisement earlier in the week, shown multiple times, just to make sure it stuck:

For the record, we didn’t watch Dallas an awful lot.  We got sent to bed right about then.  In retrospect, I’m glad.

In the present age of Digital TV and programmable DVR’s, I honestly don’t watch too many shows when they’re actually being aired. And with the fast forward function, I don’t catch too many commercials, except when (much to my wife and sons’ chagrin) I back up to see if I might be interested in. And yes, it’s usually food or vehicle-related. I’m usually in the mood for a cheeseburger, and…don’t tell her…but I may be purchasing a pickup truck very soon.

But I digress. I got to thinking about the effectiveness of commercials when I had the pleasure of discussing a blow off application with a caller recently. He was looking for a way to keep the lens of laser sensors clean…there are three sensors located inside his machine, and they are used to check & control the exact positioning of precision machined parts. As good as they are at doing so, just a little bit of coolant spray on the lens will have a pretty bad effect on their operation. When he started describing the sensor to me, I knew exactly what he was looking for, because I’d seen something just like it in a “commercial”…

These Press Releases can all be found in our Media Center.

These Press Releases can all be found in our Media Center.

OK, a Press Release, actually. Now, this is the Model HP1126SS 1” High Power 316SS Flat Super Air Nozzle, which was needed for the aggressive, high temperature environment in which this photo was taken. He didn’t need all that, so he went with the Model 1126 1” Zinc Aluminum Flat Super Air Nozzle, which has more than enough force & flow to blow off a little coolant mist, and is perfectly suitable for use around water-based solutions.

When I showed it to him, he agreed that it was exactly what he was looking for. I feel bad that I neglected to tell our Marketing folks how easy they made it for me to solve this application until now…but they totally rocked it. Thanks!

Our Application Engineers work with them to publish Press Releases, Newsletters, Case Studies, Application Database entries, and more, on a regular basis. I encourage you to check out our Media Center and Knowledge Base (registration required, but it’s free and easy) to get an idea of the full range of our abilities to solve your compressed air product applications. We can start there, and if you ever have any questions, give us a call. We’re eager to help.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
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Winter Cold = Static Issues

Winter is fast approaching us here in Cincinnati, which can mean just about anything, temperature and weather wise. For instance, 2 years ago we had a very mild winter, with warmer than usual temperatures and very little snow. I can remember golfing in December, January and even in to February, which was awesome! But last year however was much different. We experienced a very harsh winter with extreme low temperatures (several -0°F days) and a steady amount of snowfall – I know I felt like I was shoveling the driveway and sidewalk about every 2 days! The weather was so bad that local schools ran out of snow days.

brrr

There’s no stopping winter’s cold, dry air from causing static problems – solve them with our static eliminators!

The lower temperatures mean turning up the heat on the thermostat, which is going to dry out the air. As a result of the dry air, a common problem is ESD (ElectroStatic Discharge) or static electricity. All of us at some point have probably brushed our feet on the carpet to build up a charge, then “reached out and touched someone” to give them a little jolt. While this may seem slightly humorous, the truth is, static electricity can be quite problematic.

Some common static issues:

  • Spark or shocks to personnel
  • Damage to sensitive electrical components
  • Jamming of machines
  • Particulate clinging to the surface of an object
  • Unable to separate sheets or product sticking together

EXAIR offers an extensive catalog of Static Eliminators to eliminate these common issues:

Ion Air Knives – Provides a laminar sheet of high velocity, ionized airflow. Available up to 108” single-piece lengths.

Ionizing Bars – Capable of eliminating surface static within 2” of the bar.

Super Ion Air Wipe – 360° uniform ionized airflow, ideal for ionizing extruded shapes, hose, pipe, cable etc.

Ion Air Cannon – Concentrated ionized airflow, effective up to 15 feet.

Ion Air Gun – Static eliminating, hand-held air gun, allowing easy operation.

Ion Air Jet – Static eliminating spot cleaner, available in permanent or flexible mounting.

Ionizing Point – Single point ionizer, delivering a high concentration of positive and negative ions.

We also offer our Model # 7905 Digital Static Meter, allowing you to pinpoint the source of the static. Capable of reading up to +/- 20 kV with 5% accuracy (+/-) when measured at a distance of 1”.

If you are experiencing a static issue with your process, please contact an application engineer for assistance.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_JN

 

Brrr! image courtesy Neil Turner  Creative Commons License

Step 2 of Optimizing Your Compressed Air System, Find & Fix Leaks

Over the past handful of blog posts I have blogged about topics like understanding the demand on your compressor, creating a system pressure profile,  and the effectiveness of filtering your compressed air.  These are all critical steps in ensuring your compressed air system is optimized for maximum efficiency.   These can also all fall into place with our Six Steps To Compressed Air Optimization.

EXAIR Six Steps To Optimizing Your Compressed Air System

EXAIR Six Steps To Optimizing Your Compressed Air System

Another factor in the six steps is identifying and addressing leaks within your system.   Finding leaks in your compressed air system can be done several ways, one of the oldest methods is to use a soap and water mixture to spray on every joint and see if there is a leak that causes bubbles.   The next method would be to use ball valves and pressure gauges to test each run of pipe to ensure they are holding their pressure over a period of time, similar to a leak down test.  The final method, and by far the easiest, would be to utilize our Ultrasonic Leak Detector.

This can be used to sense leaks in compressed air systems up to 20′ away and can also pin point a leak by closely monitoring each joint.  Neal Raker made a great video on how to use the Ultrasonic Leak Detector a while back and it is shown below.

If you have any questions on how to find leaks or how to optimize your compressed air system, give us a call.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

How to Calculate Compressed Air Consumption at a Different Inlet Pressure OR Math Doesn’t Lie and Neither Will Your Results

EXAIR Application Engineers field a wide variety of technical assistance questions. Many are quantifiable, and we just need to do a little math.  For instance:

Q. You publish the compressed air consumption of your products assuming a supply pressure of 80psig. What if my supply pressure is different?

A. Compressed air consumption is going to be directly proportional to ABSOLUTE pressure supply. That means you have to add atmospheric pressure of 14.7psia (a=absolute) to your gauge pressure, measured in psig (g=gauged, and zero on the gauge is atmospheric pressure,) and calculate the ratio. For example:

Our catalog publishes most products' performance and specification data for a compressed air supply pressure of 80psig.

Our catalog publishes most products’ performance and specification data for a compressed air supply pressure of 80psig.

Model 1100 Super Air Nozzle consumes 14 SCFM @80psig. How much will it consume @95psig?

1100 recalc

This is good news…if you need that extra amount of flow and force from a little higher pressure supply, you’re still FAR below the air consumption of an open-ended 1/4″ copper tube (33 SCFM @80psig or 38 SCFM @95psig)* or SCH40 pipe (140 SCFM @80psig or 162 SCFM @95psig.)*

*Using the same formula above.  Check my math if you like.  I’m right, but it’ll be good practice.  Those values come from this chart in our catalog, by the way:

open blow air consumption

You can get your own personal copy of our current catalog here.

Of course, if your application doesn’t need all that flow and force, this formula works the other way too…it, in fact, works in your favor, air consumption-wise.  Consider the savings associated with dialing back your supply pressure.  Let’s say, for instance, you replace a open ended 1/4″ SCH40 pipe with a Model 1100 Super Air Nozzle, regulate the supply down to 55psig, and find that it still does what you need it to:

1100 recalc-1

(Remember, the value you’re solving for is ALWAYS the numerator of the fraction, because…Algebra! )

Now, let’s do just a little more math.  Don’t worry; I’m almost finished.  Plus, this is the part you can show your boss and be the hero.  So, we find out that you’re saving 151.7 SCFM by replacing that open pipe blow off with a Super Air Nozzle, and regulating its supply pressure down from your full line pressure of 95psig to 55psig:

162 SCFM – 10.3 SCFM = 151.7 SCFM saved

You may know your facility’s cost of compressed air generation.  If not, $0.25 per 1,000 Standard Cubic Feet (SCF) is a reasonable estimate:

151.7 SCFM X 60 minutes/hour X 8 hours/day X 5 days/week X 52 weeks/year =

18,932,160 SCF/year X $0.25/1,000 SCF = $4,733.04 annual savings

Now, this is just an example…one in which a $34.00 (Model 1100 Super Air Nozzle’s current 2014 List Price) product pays for itself before the end of the second day (again, feel free to check my math and see how right I am.)  Keep in mind that your mileage, as they say, may vary, but the math…and our products’ performance…will hold true according to whatever your conditions are.

How much can you save by using engineered, Intelligent Compressed Air Products from EXAIR?  Call me, and we’ll start the process of finding out.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
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2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle Provides Perfect Solution for Thread Cleaning

This week I worked with a customer who was wanting to remove excess fluid from a U-bolt immersing application. The U-bolts range in length from 14” to 16.5” and have (2) 7/8-14 x 2” length threaded ends. After the curing process, they were experiencing build up on the threads so they were considering using an 18” Super Air Knife. The Super Air Knife provides a high velocity, laminar sheet of airflow across the entire length of the knife, which would work well in the application and encompass the customer’s various lengths.

SAK

One-piece construction, available in aluminum, 303ss, 316ss and PVDF, with lengths from 3″ to 108″.

After further reviewing the application, we determined that they didn’t need to blow off the entire bolt, but rather focus on removing the excess fluid from the threaded ends. Once again EXAIR had the perfect solution, our 2” Flat Super Air Nozzle! The 2” Flat Super Air Nozzle uses a patented shim design (.015” installed) to maintain a critical gap, resulting in a high velocity, forceful stream of airflow. Using the optional shim kit, the shims can be changed out to .005”, .010” or .020”, which allow you to increase or decrease the force and flow. By using a pressure regulator the customer was able to adjust the supply pressure to achieve the desired result.

2 Inch Flat

Available in zinc aluminum alloy or 316ss. Produces 22 ounces of force when operating at 80 PSIG.

EXAIR offers a wide variety of Intelligent Compressed Air Products for various industrial applications. To discuss a specific application or help with selecting the correct product, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

Birthdays, Submarines, and Static Eliminators

A dear friend is turning 50 this month, and I have no intention of making a big deal of it, considering the spectacle that her husband (who is younger than both of us) is no doubt going to make of it. I was reminded of her impending birthday when I read that Alvin is also turning 50 this year.

Even at this depth, Alvin doesn't look a day over 49.

Even at this depth, Alvin doesn’t look a day over 49.

Alvin (DSV-2) is a deep-dive submersible, built in 1964. Built to dive to depths of over 8,000 feet, Alvin has had quite a storied career:

  • 1966 – Used to locate a hydrogen bomb that was lost off the coast of Spain when a US Air Force bomber “had an accident.” The bomb was retrieved a few weeks later, without incident.
  • 1967 – On dive #202, Alvin was attacked by a swordfish, at a depth of about 2,000 feet. The swordfish became entangled, forcing an emergency surface. Upon removal, the swordfish was cooked for dinner.
  • 1968 – Alvin’s tender ship accidentally dropped Alvin when some steel cables snapped, in the middle of the ocean. Three crew members onboard at the time were able to escape, but left their lunches behind. Severe weather and the development of the required technology put off Alvin’s recovery for almost a full year. A full rehab of the vessel was slated. The fruit and sandwiches left behind were found to be well preserved, and soggy but edible.
  • 1986 – Alvin was used to find the wreckage of the Titanic. While the mission was making headlines at the time, it was actually a cover story for the highly classified “real” operation: the search for USS Scorpion (SSN-589), lost under unknown circumstances in 1968. In a remarkable stroke of good fortune, both vessels were found.

That’s all neat stuff, but I’m sure there are a few spine tingling stories we’ll never hear about a deep submergence vessel, operated by the US Navy, during the height of the Cold War. Another bit of interesting trivia, though, is who built Alvin: General Mills. That’s right, the breakfast cereal folks. Turns out, they had an electromechanical division back then that pioneered advances in packaging technology, and had previously applied some of their mechanical arms to other submersibles, leading them to successfully bid the project that Alvin was born from.

This, of course, is what engineers do. EXAIR has been making Intelligent Compressed Air Products, aimed at optimizing compressed air use, increasing safety, and lowering noise levels for over 31 years now. Along the way, we’ve added products, and added TO our products to meet other frequent needs of our customers.

Consider the Air Knife: the Air Knife had been a product for years when EXAIR developed the Ionizing Bar  and added it to the Air Knife to turn it into an efficient, quiet, and safe Static Eliminator. The Air Knife then provided good information toward development of the super efficient Super Air Knife which has become the hallmark of efficiency and performance within industry.  After years of successfully solving thousands upon thousands of static dissipation applications with the Super Air Knife, we recently added one-piece designs from 60 – 108” long which used to be a two piece construction.

3to54 siak

EXAIR stock SIXTEEN different lengths, from 3″ to 108″. Custom lengths are available in as little as three days.

A quick look at our complete and comprehensive line of Static Eliminator products shows that, if you’ve got a static problem – big or small – we’ve likely got a solution for it.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
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expl1874 image courtesy of NOAA Photo Library.  Creative Commons License

Video Blog: Installing a Line Vac Air Operated Conveyor

This video blog demonstrates the simplicity of installing our Line Vac Air Operated Conveyors. The Line Vac uses a small amount of compressed air to move a large volume of material over a long distance. Requiring no electricity to operate and no moving parts, the units are virtually maintenance free. To see a Line Vac in action CLICK HERE.

For help with your Line Vac application, please do not hesitate to contact an application engineer at 1-800-903-9247.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

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