The Versatile Line Vac

Of all the tools that I own, my cordless drill has to be just about my favorite. I’m remodeling a bathroom in my house right now, and last night I was setting the new toilet flange onto the new tile floor. I had to drill some holes for this through the new tile. I’d never done this before, and was definitely feeling some heartburn about it. Especially after finding out just how fragile and brittle ceramic tile is…I cracked two pieces, just trying to cut a hole for the heat & AC vent register. Luckily, that was BEFORE I mortared & grouted it in, so it wasn’t a big deal…they’re about a buck a piece, and I got five extra anyway.

I know how to do this...but I have no idea how to fix this.

I know how to do this                                                 but I have no idea how to fix this.

THIS one, though, was fully installed, and, despite all the internet videos I found & watched on how to install a tile floor, I haven’t yet had the need to find one that shows me how to replace a broken tile. And I don’t really want to, so I went slowly and carefully with the drill, using the special glass & tile bit that I bought. On my first hole, when I got the bit through the tile itself, I changed to a different (smaller) bit to pilot the screw hole through the subfloor. Then, I put a Phillip’s head bit in to drive the screw. It occurred to me that I was performing these three related but separate tasks, with the same tool…I just thought that was very cool.

Over the course of the last couple of days, I’ve talked to three different callers, with three different Line Vac applications:

HDLV

 

*One wants to use a Model 150200 2” Heavy Duty Line Vac to convey cement. They’re currently hauling the bags, by hand, up to a hopper, where they cut them open and dump them in.

 

Heavy Duty Threaded Line Vac

*One needs to move small springs, one at a time, from a hopper to an automated assembly turret machine.  The springs are 5/8″ in diameter, and they’ll be fed through a length of PVC pipe.  Our Model 151100 1″ NPT Heavy Duty Threaded Line Vac will be easily installed in the pipe line using standard threaded fittings, and the springs will pass through the 0.75″ throat nicely.

 

sslv

 

*One has a auger-type chip conveyor that removes machining debris from a lathe, and it’s broken…again. They needed a Model 6066 3” Stainless Steel Line Vac, in a hurry, to use until they get their chip conveyor fixed. In fact, if it works, they may not fix the chip conveyor.

 

With a wide range of sizes and materials of construction, we've got your solution.  Call us.

With a wide range of sizes and materials of construction, we’ve got your solution. Call us.

So, kind of like my cordless drill, our Line Vac Air Operated Conveyors have a variety of uses, right out of the box. If you have an application that you think a Line Vac may be able to solve, give me a call.  By the way, if you order one before the end of October, 2014we’ll give you a FREE 2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle.  Really.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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3 Common Mistakes in Your Compressed Air System

Every day I speak with engineers who are having trouble using compressed air products. A common problem they have is not providing an adequate air supply to their unit. I go through a basic troubleshooting technique to ensure that their pressure and flow rate is adequate. I ask them to install tee on the inlet to the compressed air product in order to install a pressure gauge right at the inlet to the pipe. This allows us to know exactly what pressure we are supplying to the product. Customers are always surprised how the gauge on the compressor or the regulator may read 120 PSIG, but the gage on the inlet to the compressed air product is significantly less.

Last year, my colleague, Russell Bowman, made an excellent video showing how the inlet pressure at the knife will have a significant impact on the performance of the Super Air Knife.  In the video, he changes the length and ID of the compressed air supply to illustrate the difference a proper supply line will have on the performance of a compressed air products.

Not providing adequate air supply is commonly caused by these three mistakes, when plumbing compressed air systems.

1. Incorrectly Sized Piping – This can be the single biggest problem. A lack of planning before installing a compressed air product. Not all compressed air systems are created equal. Though a 1/4″ shop air hose may work for a number our products, some of our products require a larger air line because they require more volume of air to be effective. We often speak with customers an illustrate this problem by stating small air lines are like trying to feed a fire hose with a garden hose – there simply is not enough volume to create the pressure necessary to reach the fire, or solve the application in our scenarios. We publish the flow rates for all of our products and make inlet pipe size recommendation in the installation and maintenance guide furnish with the products so you may avoid this common problem. We also have air data tables in our Knowledge Base or  you may consult an application engineer who will be happy to make the proper recommendation.

2. Quick Disconnects – These handy connectors are great when operating a brad nailer, or a small blow gun, but the small through diameter can severely limit the flow rate into a long air knife, large diameter air operated conveyor, or big vortex tubes.  Due to this fact it is strongly advised to use threaded fittings or over-sized quick disconnects.

3. Adding extra hose or pipe – Extra hose is never a bad thing, right? No, an extra 30 feet of air hose can significantly drop the pressure of a compressed air system. 20 feet of ½ Pipe can flow 70 CFM with a 5 PSI pressure drop.  50 feet of ½” pipe will only flow 42 SCFM with the same 5 PSIG pressure drop. Keep your hose or pipe lengths to a minimum to improve the volume of air you can deliver to a compressed air product.

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer
DaveWoerner@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_DW

Reduce Noise Exposure with Super Air Nozzles

News from the CDC that those of us involved with industrial safety are paying close attention to is the release of their NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) division’s Hazard Evaluation Program Noise Measurement Database, which contains data obtained through Health Hazard Evaluation surveys performed between 1996 and 2012. It includes hundreds of personal noise exposure measurements (how much noise was received by individuals) and almost as many area noise measurements (how much noise was made.) A comparison of these measurements, of course, is valuable in determining if appropriate measures are being taken to abate the exposure, which is key: there are an awful lot of industrial processes where there’s nothing that can be done about the generation of noise…they’re just simply LOUD. So, they focus on what they can do to limit exposure: Use engineering controls (retrofit open line with engineered nozzles, build sound barriers) , use administrative controls (relocating personnel away from the sound), use personal protective equipment, and spending as little time as possible near the source.

Regardless of what people can get used to, the area noise associated with compressed air use CAN be reduced, while still maintaining the efficiency of the operation. Here’s the deal:

*The most basic form of air blow off is a piece of pipe, tubing, or hose connected to a source of compressed air. When it’s opened to the atmosphere, the compressed air exits with a great deal of force. This makes quite a racket, and the only way to quiet it down is to reduce the air supply pressure. Then you get less force, however, and it might not get the job done.

*Engineered air nozzles, such as EXAIR’s Super Air Nozzles, solve this problem by design:

air nozzle flow

The compressed air supply (black arrow) uses the Coanda effect when it exits the series of holes recessed in the array of fins (dark blue arrows.) This serves to entrain an enormous amount of air from the surrounding environment (light blue arrows,) which not only results in a high volume flow rate at minimal consumption, but also makes the resultant air flow very quiet.

EXAIR Super Air Nozzles are quiet, efficient, and easy to get…we maintain inventory of anything you see in the Catalog, all available for same day shipment. If you’d like to know how EXAIR products can be easy on your ears…and your wallet…give me a call!

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
(513)671-3322 local
(800)923-9247 toll free
(513)671-3363 fax
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Promo’s: Everybody Loves Free Stuff

I have been wanting to purchase a pair of good quality headphones for a while now and with vacation coming next week, I figured now was a good time to make my purchase. I was pretty set on the manufacturer but the tough choice for me was going to be if I wanted a set of earbuds (that fit directly in the ear) or a more traditional pair of “over the ear” headphones. smiley_face_headphones_tshirt-d23545082320430684226v7p_325I tried about 4 different pairs of over the ear units to see what the quality of sound was versus the feel/comfort and was pleasantly surprised but was still leaning towards earbuds. Unfortunately, due to health/cleanliness issues, you aren’t allowed to try on earbuds – which makes sense. So if I was going to go the earbud route I wanted to make sure I had all my questions answered so I decided to get a salesperson to assist me.

We went over features/benefits but this only made me question myself more. Seeing that I was struggling with a decision, the salesperson decided to make my choice a little easier – he mentioned that his store, along with the manufacturer, were offering a free promo but only if I purchased a set of earbuds (at a certain price of course). Due to the sound quality and trusted manufacturer, I was leaning towards a set of earbuds anyway, but hey – who doesn’t love FREE stuff? What they were offering was a free carrying case (not really free since it was already in the box), a free 2 year service agreement ($37 value) and a $25 gift card to their store.

Of course, I took advantage of their offer and made the purchase. After listening to the earbuds while I finished my packing, I couldn’t be happier with my selection.

At EXAIR, we occasionally run promotional offers too. From now through September 30th, 2014, if you purchase one of our Precision Safety Air Guns, Soft Grip Safety Air Guns or our Heavy Duty Safety Air Guns (with or without an Aluminum extension), you will receive a FREE Chip Shield.

Free Chip Shield Promo
The polycarbonate Chip Shield, meeting OSHA 1910-242(b) for compressed air use, offers the operator safe and smart protection from flying debris as well as any splashing. Not to mention that all of our Safety Air Guns incorporate one of our Engineered Super Air Nozzles that meet or exceed the same OSHA standard and reduce air consumption and sound level.

This offer is good for all three models of our Safety Air Guns:

  • Durable, Lightweight, Precision Airflow – The Precision Safety Air Gun is a small ergonomic gun good for light duty cleaning or blowoff and fits well in smaller hands. It also has a strong focused blast of air capable of reaching into tight spaces.
  • Versatile, Industrial Duty, Most Popular – The Soft Grip Safety Air Gun is our most popular gun cast from aluminum with a comfortable four finger trigger to reduce fatigue over long periods. A large variety of air nozzle options provides a solution for light to heavy duty blowoff applications.
  • Powerful, Rugged, Robust – The Heavy Duty Safety Air Gun is the powerhouse you need for the harshest environments and stubborn blowoff applications. It is outfitted with many of our most powerful nozzles to provide the highest force upon your application.

To learn more about this offer, please visit our website www.EXAIR.com or if you have a specific application you would like to discuss, give us a call at 1-800-903-9247.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
JustinNicholl@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_JN

 

Minor Adjustments, Advice From An Expert Source

It’s not every day that we hear a customer say that our products aren’t consuming ENOUGH air, but that’s exactly what happened to me yesterday. I received a call from one of our long-standing customers who was experiencing reduced air consumption with our Model # 3202 Vortex Tube. The Vortex Tube uses compressed air to create a stream of cold air and a stream of hot air, providing a temperature range from -50°F to +260°F and cooling capacity up to 10,200 Btu/hr. Also, these units have no moving parts and are virtually maintenance free, making them the ideal choice for a variety of industrial spot cooling applications.

Vortex Tubes

This particular customer has been purchasing this model for several years, so they are pretty familiar with the performance and operation of the unit. They advised they were used to seeing air consumption at approximately 60 liters/minute or 2 SCFM (exactly what the Model # 3202 is designed to consume at 100 psig inlet pressure) but were starting to experience about a 50% drop to 30 liter/minute or 1 SCFM. We discussed the common troubleshooting:

  • Low supply pressure? (measuring at the inlet of the Vortex Tube during operation)
  • Compressed air inlet temperature? (warmer than ambient air – reducing performance)
  • Reduced cold flow? (possible clog from contaminants in the compressed air supply)
  • Unit seeing any back pressure? (up to 2 PSIG is acceptable, 5 PSIG will reduce approximately 5°F)
  • Over-tightened Cold Cap or Cold Muffler? (is it too tight?)

The customer advised they were using a push-to-lock fitting, where they drilled out the center and then would install it in the Cold Cap of the Vortex Tube. Their operator would hold the body of the Vortex Tube, by the air inlet, then take a wrench and thread the fitting into the ¼” NPT female opening on the Cold Cap. Without realizing, the operator was also turning the Cold Cap which was causing it to become over-tightened.  This in turn would reduce the consumption of the unit because it would shrink the internal air chamber.

Vortex Tube Exploded View

 

I made the suggestion to my customer to slightly loosen the Cold Cap and see if that didn’t fix the consumption issue. They called me back about an hour later and were very pleased to advise that now the unit was “working great!”.

We want to help you maximize our products, while optimizing your compressed air system. If you have a similar performance issue or would like to discuss your application, please contact us.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_JN

The Rate Is Right?

This morning, we played our own little version of a popular segment of the game show “The Price Is Right,” right here in the Application Engineering department. Brian Farno (our manager and host extraordinaire) presented us with a question (that he already knew the answer to after speaking with a current customer):

What would you expect the conveyance rate to be, for an EXAIR Model 6083 1-1/2” Aluminum Line Vac, conveying hot-melt glue pellets, across a total distance of 15 feet vertically & 100 feet horizontally? (And please note we normally have a bulk density in lbs./ft3 and/or other associated information about pipe bends, product shape etc. – but we took our best shot at it anyway).

Our office doesn't look like this.  I kinda wish it did, though...

Our office doesn’t look like this. I kinda wish it did, though…

We didn’t have those cool podiums to stand behind that recorded our answers on the screen, but here’s what we came up with:

Russ Bowman: 5 lbs per minute
Dave Woerner: 10 lbs per minute
Justin Nicholl: 8 lbs per minute
Professor Penurious: 1 lb per minute (Insert $1 bid joke here)

Now, we had all referenced our wealth of data charts for conveyance rates with our Line Vac product series. We used several very different materials over a few different lengths/heights, and use that data to estimate what a user might expect to see, based on how close their application is to our actual test conditions. I actually used this data for my answer – a 1-1/2” Aluminum Line Vac conveyed tumbling media (64 lbs/cu ft; the lowest bulk density material we tested for) at a rate of about 5-1/2 lbs/minute, going 20 feet vertically.

Left: hot-melt glue pellets.  Right: tumbling media

Left: hot-melt glue pellets. Right: tumbling media

Turns out, Dave came the closest without going over: they were actually getting a little over 11 lbs per minute…again, going 15 feet up and 100 feet over. The user was so pleased with the results, they’re incorporating a Line Vac in a similar application, involving hot-melt glue pillows. We’ve now added their data to our database and are pleased with the knew knowledge.

Hot-melt glue pillows

Hot-melt glue pillows

If you have an application involving hopper loading, bulk material conveying, chip removal, parts transfer, etc., and would like to find out how an EXAIR Line Vac can help, give me a call. We might both be impressed with the results. Come on down!

Professor Penurious, by the way, is still concentrating on hosting the game shows.  Stay tuned…

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
(513)671-3322 local
(800)923-9247 toll free
(513)671-3363 fax
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New Beginnings

It’s been a big week for the Nicholl family as our 5 year old son started Kindergarten. On Monday night we had orientation where we learned all the new rules/policy changes for the upcoming year and he was able to meet his new teacher and classmates. He was a little nervous at first because there are 19 kids in this year’s Kindergarten class and last year in K-4 there were only 8. But his anxieties were relieved relatively quickly as 4 of his previous classmates were in this year’s class, including his “best bud”. To make things even “more awesomer” (he is only 5), they were all going to be able to sit together – which I kindly advised his new teacher that she may want to reconsider this choice. Five little buddies all sitting together? That may not be the easiest situation to handle! – HAHA.

kindergarten_room

Wednesday was the big first day so of course it was an event – Mommy, Daddy, Nana and Maw Maw were all there to welcome him to, as he refers to it, “big boy school”. He went straight in to the room, took out his snack then went out in the hallway to hang up his book bag in his locker. Locker? I didn’t have a locker in Kindergarten! That’s when my little guy reminded me – “Dada, this is big boy school, of course I have a locker now!” He then said his goodbyes to us, walked right back in to the room, sat down at his desk and started going through his new supply box. We all left happy and were relieved that he was so excited to start this new chapter in his life. As his father, it is a little bittersweet watching our little man grow up so fast but it is “awesomer” to see him also expand his learning.

At EXAIR we are always striving to grow and expand too. We recently released our new Catalog # 27 which includes some of our exciting new Intelligent Compressed Air Product additions:

One-piece construction Super Air Knives from 3” – 108” – available in Aluminum, 303 and 316 Stainless Steel, and PVDF (PVDF up to 54″) construction.

Internal Mix Deflected Flat Fan Pattern Atomizing Nozzle – designed for tight spaces with spray pattern at a right angle to the nozzle orientation

Internal Mix 360° Hollow Circular Pattern Atomizing Nozzle – designed so the spray pattern is directed away from the nozzle in all directions

No Drip Internal Mix Deflected Flat Fan and Internal Mix 360° Hollow Circular Atomizing Nozzles – the same features as above but also provide the stopping of liquid flow when compressed air is turned off

High Lift Reversible Drum Vac System – with its high powered vacuum, this system is able to vacuum liquids up to 15’. Available in 30, 55 and 110 Gallon

110 Gallon Heavy Duty HEPA Vac – meeting all the HEPA requirements but now available in 110 Gallon capacity

Catalog 27

To discuss how these new products may work with your process(es) or any of our other products may benefit your current system, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
JustinNicholl@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_JN

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