E-Vac For Vacuum Gluing

I’m sure that the technique of using vacuum to assist in holding two items together during a gluing process has been around as long as the materials which could produce an air tight seal (vacuum bag or bladder) have been in existence.  Probably since polymers were first produced in the early 20th century.  Vacuum gluing, as I’ll term it here, seems to be in widespread use in the musical instrument building and furniture building industries.

You may ask, “What does this have to do with EXAIR?” Since EXAIR has been producing our E-Vac vacuum generator products, we have been running into various applications for which we found there was a need to produce a high level of vacuum (say -21″ to -27″ Hg range). The most recent and interesting application for me as a musician was in building guitars.

It is my understanding after speaking to one, that there are quite a lot of custom guitar builders out there who need a way to create force between the bridge and sound board of a guitar to ensure proper gluing between the two components.

The fixture consists of a frame that incorporates an air tight membrane and a port to which a vacuum source can be applied. This is where the E-vac comes into play. Up until now, the vacuum was created by a dedicated, mechanical vacuum pump. But now, the E-Vac can be connected to a small, roll-around compressor to produce the necessary vacuum to suck the membrane down around the bridge and create the needed down-force without clamping the whole instrument body.

My point is that the vacuum gluing process is not new by any means, but how you generate the vacuum could be.  It can also be more economical with our prices starting at just $58.00 US.

So, if your business or hobby involves gluing processes that could benefit from vacuum technology, please take a look at our E-vac vacuum generators or call us. We would be glad to help figure things out for your application.

Neal Raker
Application Engineer
nealraker@exair.com

Line Vac Leaves No Mess

I got a call from a rubber and vinyl tile and flooring manufacturer last week.  They were having problems with the little shavings building up on and around the machines as the tiles were being manufactured, creating quite a mess.  Someone was having to spend time and energy periodically cleaning the area and taking the piles to a collection area. 

The particles were very small, and they only needed to be moved about 3ft over and 8ft up to the collection area.  So, our Model 6080 1″ Aluminum Line Vac was a perfect fit for the job.  The conveying distance is well within the capabilities of the unit, and it will only require minimal demand on their compressed air system.  It will also easily be able to keep up with the rate at which the chips are being generated, preventing any buildup of scrap material.

This will virtually eliminate any extra time for cleanup, and no shavings will pile up, maintaining a clean working area.

Emily Mortimer
Application Engineer
emilymortimer@exair.com

Engineered Vs. Ordinary

An air nozzle is an air nozzle, right? If I could write a buzzer sound, a wrong answer sound, I would. Because there are clear and measurable differences between Engineered Air Nozzles and ordinary air nozzles.

Step number three in Six Steps to Optimization is:
1. Measure your air consumption
2. Locate and fix any compressed air leaks in the system
3. Upgrade your end use blow off applications with engineered products
4. Turn off the compressed air when not needed for production
5. Use intermediate storage of compressed air near the point of use
6. Control the pressure at the point of use to minimize consumption

Your ordinary nozzle with a through hole and a cross drilled hole can be an easy choice based upon price, but if you do not consider the operating cost you do not really know how much it is costing you. An Engineered Air Nozzle will pay for itself and lower operating costs quickly. Engineered Air Nozzles are the future of compressed air efficiency and are made to replace ordinary nozzles, homemade nozzles and open line blow offs.

Engineered Nozzles reduce air consumption and noise levels; ordinary nozzles cannot compete. Engineered Nozzles maintain safety features and can qualify for an energy savings rebate from a local uitility; ordinary nozzles fall short. Open blow off or homemade blow off applications typically violate OSHA safety standards; Engineered Nozzles do not.

Engineered air nozzles can produce a larger net gain of efficiency than ordinary nozzles. EXAIR’s product line includes many different models of an Engineered Air Nozzle including our highly efficient Super Air Amplifiers, Super Air Knives and Super Air Nozzles. Each of them, applied properly, have the ability to reduce air consumption, reduce noise levels, increase safety, and reduce compressed air operating costs.

So if you have open blow offs, manifolds with ordinary nozzles, pipes with drilled holes or prefer the lower cost cheap nozzle – find out how much air you are using with these products and look to EXAIR to begin your air savings program.

Kirk Edwards
Application Engineer
kirkedwards@exair.com

Vortex Cooling a Variable Speed Motor

It is hard to imagine coming off the coldest spell of the year that I would be presented with a cooling application. In steel mills, paper converters, bakeries, and canning companies, indoor temperatures can be quite high regardless of the outdoor temperatures.

My customer was operating a variable speed motor near an autoclave. The motor was equipped with a fan blade attached to the spindle. At higher RPM’s the fan is able to circulate enough air to keep the motor cooled. But at lower RPM’s, there is insufficient airflow and the motor overheats.

I recommended he build a plenum over the air intake and install a Model 3240 Vortex Tube to feed air into the fan without introducing hot ambient air. The cool dry air from the Vortex Tube not only cooled the motor but it also prevented steam from entering the motor when the autoclave was opened. This in turn eliminated corrosion to the internals parts of the motor.

Joe Panfalone
Application Engineer
joepanfalone@exair.com

I have a 1/4″ coiled hose with a 1/4″ quick connect fitting, will that work?

The answer to this question when it comes to powering a compressed air tool is that it really depends on what it is you want to operate.  If you have some tiny die grinder or very small air nozzle, the answer might be yes, it would work to an acceptable level.

Being a company that supplies compressed air operated tools for a wide variety of applications means we have product that spans a large range of air consumption requirements. And, to the novice user, it may seem like they can simply plug anything into any size compressed air hose and it should work, right?   Well, this is not so.

In many conversations I have with customers, I compare compressed air and its flow to electricity with the following concepts:
1. Pressure = Voltage
2. Flow (SCFM) = Amperage
3. Compressed air line size = Wire gauge
4. Restrictions to flow = Resistor
5. Receiver tank = Capacitor

The reason I attempt to draw the above parallels is that it seems more folks are familiar with electricity. So, we try to go from the known to the unknown.

By increasing the wire gauge (pipe size), eliminting the resistors in the system (restrictions) and including a capacitor in the circuit (receiver tank), you can make the overall function of the compressed air system and the end use items all work much more efficiently and effectively for your application needs.

If you find yourself stuck in an application where maybe you have less than desirable performance, give us a call or send us an e-mail. We will be glad to help walk you through the trouble-shooting procedure. Who knows, the solution to your problem might be as simple as removing that 1/4″ quick connect fitting from your compressed air line or changing an undersized hose.

Besides having a fairly wide ranging catalog of compressed air products, we do have lots of experience we can draw upon to help you understand the right mindset and direction to take when things may not go so well right off the bat.

Neal Raker
Application Engineer
nealraker@exair.com

Vacuum Generators: Not Just For Pick and Place

Vacuum generation can take on many forms and have many uses.  EXAIR is relatively new to supplying these types of products, only having them available for about a year now.  It is always interesting to me to hear about the different types of applications that one of our E-Vacs can solve. 

For me, the first application that comes to mind when I think of vacuum generators is pick-and-place.  But, the E-Vac application call I got last week was not this at all.  The call came from a plastic sheet extrusion machine manufacturer who was actually looking to hold down the end of an 84″ wide paper tail.  They needed to hold it onto one side of a hollow square pipe that had 1/8″ diameter holes spaced 1″ apart, all down the 84″ length of the pipe. 

Because of the lightweight nature of the paper, a Porous, Low Vacuum E-Vac was the better choice.  To ensure sufficient vacuum across the entire length, multiple units would be required.  After some discussion, it was decided that the best product for the job would be 4pc of our model 800005H Medium-Sized Porous E-Vac.  This unit actually also includes a muffler, to keep the noise level generated down to 83dBA.  Because the paper needed to be held directly against the holes in the tube, no vacuum cups were needed.  So, 4pc of this standard, off the shelf item can be quickly delivered, and will easily solve the problem of holding the the paper tail in place. 

If you have a unique application you think an E-Vac would work well in, or are already using an E-Vac for an application and would like to share, we and the other EXAIR Blog readers would be interested to hear about it. 

Emily Mortimer
Application Engineer
emilymortimer@exair.com

What’s That Sound?

It’s the sound of your compressed air leaking from your pipe joints, couplings, tube and pipe fittings, filters, regulators and quick disconnects. But here is the secret – you can’t really hear it unless it is a very large leak!

Step number two in Six Steps to Optimization is:
     1. Measure your air consumption
     2. Locate and fix any compressed air leaks in the system
     3. Upgrade your end use blow off applications with engineered products
     4. Turn off the compressed air when not needed for production
     5. Use intermediate storage of compressed air near the point of use
     6. Control the pressure at the point of use to minimize consumption

Not fixing your compressed air system leaks can cause your system pressure to fluctuate and affect your equipment negatively. It may cause you to run a larger compressor than necessary for your compressed air needs and raise your total costs. Or it could cause your cycle and run times to increase which leads to increased maintenance to the entire system.

The best tool for locating these pesky little leaks is an Ultrasonic Leak Detector which converts the ultrasonic sound of a pressurized leak to an audible tone. It is an important tool to begin locating and fixing compressed air leaks. These leaks can contribute to 25% of your compressor capacity if left unattended!

EXAIR’s Ultrasonic Leak Detector is a great tool to begin an air leak program and get these costs under control. It allows you to locate the leaks you would never hear otherwise. It is easy to operate and is low cost.

For mor information about a leak detection program go to the Compressed Air Challenge Factsheet

Kirk Edwards
Application Engineer
kirkedwards@exair.com

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