LIQUID ATOMIZING SPRAY NOZZLES – how they work and available options

EXAIR’s Liquid Atomizing Nozzles are some of the very few items that we make that do not use compressed air as the energy source. Instead, pressurized liquids provide the energy. Sometimes the nozzles will create an internal spinning liquid or the nozzle will cause the liquid to impact another surface. Each method , spinning or impacting, causes the liquid to lose its surface tension and atomize into small droplets. These nozzles can generate more liquid flow than our Air Atomizing Nozzles, which mix the liquid with air and produce the smallest droplet sizes. Depending on your liquid atomizing nozzle selection, you can spray anywhere from 0.48 gallons per minute, up to 17.64 gallons per minute.

This amount of liquid is typically used for cooling, rinsing, dust suppression and washing, but there are many other applications as well. These nozzles will work well with solution that have particulates in it, including slurries.

With a very small footprint, all stainless steel construction, and no moving parts, these are a great fit, for not only the easy to get to conveyors or containers, but also those hard to reach spots as well. Couple this with not needing air, and they are easy to plumb, and easy to use. They are made of 303 Stainless Steel and can accommodate temps up to 800°F.

Currently, we have 2 liquid nozzle types. One type is a FullStream Cone which comes in 1/4″, 3/8″ and 1/2″ NPT. The other type is a HollowStream Cone that comes in 1/4″ and 3/8″ NPT. With these nozzles, the fluid is supplied into the body creating a swirling action within the vortex chamber. This Vortex is what creates the cone pattern. Then the precision orifice of the nozzle breaks this surface tension, and it leaves the nozzle with a full circular pattern (FullSstream), or a hollow ring pattern (HollowStream).

With this information, we are now down to choosing the size we need. We offer performance tables, within our catalogue, or on the website, that will show you the following:

  1. Inlet Connection
  2. Nozzle Capacity
  3. Max Free Passage (Orifice size for particulate)
  4. Flow Rates in Gallons (or Litres) per minute bases on psi of liquid
  5. Spray width based upon the psi, and distance from the surface

Here is an example of the FullStream Cone Nozzles – 1/4″ NPT:

As you choose your Liquid Atomizing Nozzle, it all comes down to the type of spray you need and how much liquid you need to spray. Once you decide betwen FullStream or HollowStream Cone and you know the amount of liquid pressure you have (and can adjust too) and the amount of liquid you are wanting to spray, comes down to scouting the performance tables of the sizes we offer and selecting the perfect one for your application.

Thank you for stopping by,

Brian Wages

Application Engineer EXAIR Corporation
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The Blog of all Blogs: A Quick Resource of Blogs that we Blogged

EXAIR started writing Blogs in 2008. Since then, we have written well over 2000 Blogs. There is a ton of information in our Blog section on the website. There is most likely a Blog or 10 written about nearly each one of our products. These are primarily written by application engineers that know a thing or two about our products. There are also many application Blogs, that may be very relatable to what you are doing. When you journey to our Blog page (or simply click Blog form EXAIR.com), simply type in a key word or two in our search bar. This search bar is located just below the first row of published Blogs on the right hand of the screen, here is a screenshot of that section (right). You can also choose to follow our blog here as well.

As application engineers, we get asked questions every day. Many of these questions are best answered in one (or more) of these 2000+ Blogs. Many times a picture or video can answer your questions much more precisely than a quick conversation or an email. Many times we will send you a blog link to help. Drawing from my own experience, and asking the other Application Engineers for their lists, I wanted to put our most referenced blogs in one helpful location. I’ve categorized these the best that I can, and hopefully this will be a useful resource for you today, and in the future.

OPTIMIZING YOUR COMPRESSED AIR SYSTEM

Six Steps to Optimizing Your Compressed Air System

This is one of the key sections to our blogs. One of our main goals is to help you optimize your system. Here are 6 blogs that go into detail on each of these key points:

  1. Six Steps to Optimization: Step 1 – Measure the Air Consumption
  2. Six Steps to Compressed Air Optimization: Step 2 – Find and Fix Leaks.
  3. Six Steps to Compressed Air Optimization: Step 3 – Use Efficient and Quiet Engineered Products
  4. Six Steps to Optimizing Compressed Air: Step 4, Turn it Off When Not in Use
  5. Installing Secondary Receiver Tanks: Step 5 in Optimizing Your Compressed Air System
  6. Six Steps to Optimization: Step 6 – Control the Air Pressure at the Point of Use to Minimize Air Consumption

INDUSTRIAL HOUSEKEEPING

This is a product line that has a lot of maintenance questions, probably because these products are used to clean up dirt, and where there is dirt, there can be problems, clogs and leaks:

One of the most common questions we have concerns the Reversible Drum Vacuum (RDV) refurbishment Blog. The RDV is used on the Reversible Drum Vac, and the Chip Trapper products. We offer a refurb service for a fee, but most of the time you can do this on your own by watching and following this blog: Cleaning the Reversible Drum Vac

The Chip Trapper has two very popular blogs as well: Finding and Fixing Chip Trapper Vacuum Leaks as well as Cleaning the Chip Trapper’s Directional Valve

CABINET COOLERS

  1. Calculating Heat loads for Cabinet Coolers
  2. Finding the correct internal temperature of your Electrical Cabinet – don’t use a temp gun
  3. Thermostat & Solenoid Valve
  4. How To Install An EXAIR NEMA 4 or 4X Cabinet Cooler® System
  5. EXAIR Side Mount Kits for NEMA Type 4-4X Cabinet Cooler® Systems
  6. Cold Air Distribution Kit Installation
  7. Installing A Dual Cabinet Cooler Hardware Kit
  8. How to identify your Cabinet Cooler

VORTEX TUBES

  1. Vortex Tubes for Dummies
  2. Adjusting the Vortex Tube
  3. Vortex Tube Cold Fraction – effects on flow and temperature
  4. Application: Creating Freeze Seals for water lines

SUPER AIR KNIVES

  1. Application: Bottle Drying with Super Air Knife (instead of blower)
  2. Application: Super Air Knives drying automotive parts
  3. How to position and mount your Air Knife
  4. Which Air Knife should you choose?
  5. Super Air Knife Plumbing Kits
  6. Maximizing Super Air Knives with Shims

LINE VACS / CONVEYOR SYSTEMS

  1. Why Line Vacs need ambient air
  2. How to drill out Line Vac Generator Holes for increased performance
  3. Application: Conveying Coffee Beans

AIR AMPLIFIERS

  1. Super Air Amplifier Ratios explained
  2. Air Amplifier vs Fan – for cooling
  3. Application: Super Air Amplifier evacuating smoke or fumes

AIR ATOMIZING SPRAY NOZZLES

  1. Choosing the right Atomizing nozzle
  2. No-Drip Nozzle repair video
  3. Atomizing Nozzle identification
  4. Application: Atomizing Spray nozzles and Gummy Bears

SAFETY AIR GUNS

  1. Putting the Safe in Safety Air Guns
  2. Safety Air Gun Accessories, Extensions, Chip Shields and more
  3. Chip Shield sizes and selections

GEN 4 STATIC ELIMINATORS

  1. Changing the Gen 4 Power Supply Fuse
  2. Replacing the rocker switch on a Gen 4 Power Supply
  3. Changing the high power cord on the Gen 4 Ion Air Cannon
  4. Application: Solving Static and Print quality in food packaging

E-VAC VACUUM GENERATORS

  1. How to build a custom E-Vac System
  2. Choosing the right size Vacuum Cups

ACCESSORIES – FILTERS AND REGULATORS

  1. Filter Separator and Pressure Regulator with coupling kit installation 
  2. Rebuilding an Automatic Drain Filter Separator 
  3. Overview of EXAIR accessories

CALCULATIONS AND MORE

  1. Calculating SCFM at any pressure
  2. ROI Calculations with EXAIR products
  3. Do you need a receiver tank?
  4. EXAIR’s Calculator Library
  5. EXAIR’s OSHA compliance

OPTIMZATION – EFC, FLOWMETERS, AND ULTRASONIK LEAK DETECTORS

  1. EFC – Application: Candy Company saves big money with EFC
  2. Flowmeter – How to install a Hot Tap Flowmeter
  3. Flowmeter – Moving and or using Block-Off rings

There are many more blogs and videos at your disposal. This is just a recap of many of our most used, most viewed and most helpful for the day-to-day conversations that happen here at EXAIR. If you have ideas for new blogs – we would love to hear that as well. Please feel free to reach out at any time for more information on any of our intelligent compressed air products.

Thank you for stopping by,

Brian Wages

Application Engineer

EXAIR Corporation
Visit us on the Web
Follow me on Twitter

Cover photo by clker-free-vector-image licensed by Pixabay

Why you need Oil Removal Filters for Compressed Air

There are only a few things that can have an adverse effect on EXAIR‘s Intelligent compressed air products. If you supply clean, condensate free compressed air to our products they will last a long long time. Most compressor systems have large dryers and filters for the air at the source, these are necessary, but are they enough? Most of the time that answer is a big NO. The 2 main types of industrial air compressors are Reciprocating, and Rotary Screw compressors. Spoiler alert – this is why you need an Oil Filter at each point of use…

With a Reciprocating and a Rotary Screw Compressor, oil is used to lubricate them. When that oil makes it past the main separator filter and into the discharge piping, that is called Oil Carry-Over. Oil Carry-Over is typically caused by one of these top 10 reasons (no specific order); 1) too much oil in the reservoir 2) Low temperature 3) malfunctioning filter separator 4) the scavenge line (oil return line) is clogged 5) oil has degraded over time 6) Worn out scraper rings 7) Worn out liner 8) Light load on the compressor 9) wrong oil type 10) Faulty minimum pressure valve

Photo by Cagper Licensed by Pixabay

The older your compressor, the more likely that one or more of these maintenance issues happen. And unfortunately, just like you and I, these systems keep getting older, honestly I wish I could get an oil change and a tune up from time to time to perform better, maybe get a few spare parts replaced? But I digress…

Here is a question for you. How confident are you that the maintenance on your compressor is always at 100%? I do not mean this as questioning your maintenance staff, plans, or follow through… Well yeah I kind of do. Things happen, things get overlooked, missed, people change, things get lost, processes change, too many chiefs, and so many more reasons why the maintenance may get missed on occasion. After all, when was the last time you changed the oil in your car on time, or at the exact mile? Life happens, things get missed. This is a main reason why engineering best practices recommends that you install point of use Filter separators and Air and Oil Removal Filters to add that extra layer of protection.

I am primarily focused on our Oil Removal Filters in this blog, but the Filter Separators are extremely important too. They both are designed to be installed in line, set up between the compressor and the compressed air tool you are using, generally within close proximity to the end use product like a Super Air Knife or Vortex Tube. Our Filter Separators give us a first line of defense with a 5 micron filter element, removing water, dirt, and particles. The Oil Filter then filters that air with a 0.03 micron to remove the remaining oil and these other submicron particles. If you would like to see a video of exactly how this is set up and how these work please click here.

I like to think of these filters as small little insurance policies. A few dollars up front will save you a lot of money down the road if something goes awry. Please feel free to contact me, or any of the application engineers for any questions and these filters, or any of our intelligent compressed air products.

Thank you for stopping by,

Brian Wages

Application Engineer

EXAIR Corporation
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Cover photo Oil Rig Industry Old licensed by Pixabay

Blow Off Systems for the “W”

Many times we have tendencies to overcomplicate things. I remember a time when I was visiting my sister in Phoenix, and she was making a fancy 3D Scooby-Doo cake for my nephew’s 4th or 5th, and she needed the brown icing. Now when decorating these cakes, the common practice is to make white icing and use food coloring to make all of the other colors you need. She left that morning around 10:00 to look for brown food coloring. Around noon she called to tell us that she could not find brown food coloring at any store on this side of town, and was driving to the far side of the city to look at those stores. I asked her why she couldn’t just use chocolate icing, and she was having no part of it. She was so laser focused on her solution that she couldn’t hear that that chocolate icing is also brown… Fast forward to 6:30 PM, and she comes walking through the door frustrated and exhausted from her day of going store to store all over the large city looking for the elusive brown food coloring. As you can probably guess, she had chocolate icing with her because it finally hit her that the chocolate icing is brown… . The cake turned out amazing, and the lesson was learned.

So, why this story? I feel that in life and in business we sometimes leave our blinders on and become laser focused on one certain way of doing something. We know that the way we se it will work, and think that we know best, and we are going to make it happen exactly how it is playing out in our head. No other way seems possible, and when someone offers up a simpler solution, our immediate thought is “it can’t be that simple”, or “if it’s that simple of a solution, there is no way it could work”. Have you ever said these things? As an application engineer, I take a lot of calls from people that are much smarter than me with grandiose plans. Many times the problem they need to solve, is much simpler than the solution they have in mind. I’ve seen elaborate plans, that probably took hours if not days to develop, come down to simply needing a simple out of the box Blow-Off System.

At EXAIR, we specialize in intelligent compressed air products with a primary focus on blow off, drying, and cooling. When it comes to these things, our product lines (pointedly for this blog, our Air Nozzles and Jets) are head and shoulders above our competition. The vast majority (with the exceptions of the High power or high force nozzles – for obvious reasons) all meet both OSHA standards concerning noise and dead end pressure. Here is a list of all of our Super Air Nozzles showing the SCFM, Force and Decibels:

Our Blow Off Systems (some sample pics below) are a fantastic and smart solution for so many applications. It really doesn’t get much easier than this, a Magnetic base, a Stay-Set Hose, and a Super Air Nozzle, all in one. I feel that these are heavily under utilized. Simply connect your air hose, bend the Stay-Set Hose to the direction of spray that you need, and boom, Bob’s your uncle…

Mag Bases come with one or two outlets. Stay Set Hoses come in lengths from 6″ to 36″.

Sometimes things can be as simple as using chocolate icing for brown icing, or using an EXAIR Blow-Off System in your application. Of course if you need more than that, we will help you find the right solution for you. Call today to speak with an experienced application engineer that is eager to help.

Thank you for stopping by,

Brian Wages

Application Engineer

EXAIR Corporation
Visit us on the Web
Follow me on Twitter