5 Years Blogging

As Kirk Edwards mentioned earlier this week, we’ve blogged for more than 5 years now.  The EXAIR Blogstarted before I was part of EXAIR, and it continues to grow more and more with every post which is almost a daily occurrence.  If you look at some of the first blog posts they are fairly straight and to the point on applications, the first one even included a video of a popular application.

first blog

Now if you look at them, we don’t just cover applications, each Application Engineer has an individual voice and message that can almost always loop back to an experience here at EXAIR.  Over the years our blog has grown to include pictures, polls, and videos from all different areas, even some crazy videos from Professor Penurious (search “professor”).

When we started the blog, it launched EXAIR into the Social Media world, we now have a presence on our blog, Facebook, Twitter, Google +, and You Tube.  Not only are we on these sites, we are constantly posting new information, new ideas, and new ways to utilize our products.   Over the five years we have seen some social media attempts from similar companies come and go.  We have also seen some stellar examples from other manufacturers. Oddly enough, the companies who have been able to sustain their social media campaigns and remain proactive also seem to sustain new product development and remain proactive with their customer service efforts. We consider ourselves in good company and have learned many things from other manufacturers who have chosen to remain committed to blogging and other social media platforms.

One reason we sustain and remain committed is to ensure that our customers have the most up to date information about optimizing your compressed air system.  We also enjoy being able to express our personalities through a different platform. We want you to have as many ways possible to contact us, learn about us, but also get a response.

If you have any questions, or would like some more information on anything we post on a social media site, feel free to contact us.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Evolution of the Super Efficient Super Air Nozzle

To survive an ever demanding competitive market and meet sustainability goals, efficient use of compressed air energy is mandatory. EXAIR is there to help with its line of engineered nozzles. The following video demonstrates the progression from an inefficient open pipe, to EXAIR’s first energy efficient Safety Air Nozzle, and to the current super efficient and quiet Super Air Nozzle.

If you would like assistance in selecting the right product for your application call our application engineers at 1-800-903-9247

Joe Panfalone
Application Engineer
Phone (513) 671-3322
Fax (513) 671-3363
Web: http://www.exair.com
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/exair_jp
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

EXAIR Receives Honorable Mention in Green Manufacturer Product Innovation Award

EXAIR’s model 1126, 1″ Flat Super Air Nozzle received an honorable mention from Green Manufacturer magazine for the 2013 Product Innovation Awards. This competition was open to technology developers and manufacturers who have introduced new products designed to ensure environmental sustainability between January 1, 2012 and April 1, 2013. Green Manufacturer magazine includes a diverse range of products from biological building materials to welding tools, each with a unique set of qualifications and applications.

The competition focuses on the greenness of the product and how sustainably it is manufactured, as well as the ecopractices of the company. The claims were verified through judging which relied on third party testing and certification, reports to published databases, provision of specific metrics/quantitative information, and customer testimonials with quantitative data.

IMG_3206
The award with the 1″ Flat Super Air Nozzles and shims

Our engineered air nozzles, when compared to open blow off or traditional commercial nozzle designs, reduce compressed air consumption and the associated costs of producing compressed air. The lower compressed air volume required from EXAIR’s engineered air nozzles results in less electricity to generate the compressed air. Engineered air nozzles also reduce noise pollution better than traditional solutions and reduce noise exposure levels for personnel.

The model #1126, 1″ Flat Super Air Nozzle is available in a zinc/aluminum alloy suitable for most environments or 316 stainless steel when a higher level of corrosion resistance is necessary. The zinc/aluminum alloy used for this nozzle generally requires less energy
than similar materials to transform into finished products, release no pollutants and no toxic residues during the work cycle, and are fully recyclable at the end of their useful lives.

EXAIR’s whole line of Flat Super Air Nozzles also utilize an internal shim which restricts large amounts of compressed use. The design entrains additional surrounding air in order to provide added volume and force for each application.

EXAIR also takes responsibility for our own processes and manufacturing facility by adhering to our own sustainability plan. This plan helps us reduce waste, recycle more material, reduce energy consumption, reduce water consumption, and keep our employees informed and responsible.

Thanks to Green Manufacturer magazine for recognizing our efforts to keep energy consumption low and sustainability high.

Kirk Edwards
Application Engineer
kirkedwards@exair.com

 

History of Compressed Air

The first use of compressed air did not come from compressors but the human lung. Healthy lungs can exert a pressure of .3 to 1.2 psi. Primitive people used the power of their lungs to propel darts from a blow gun. We use our lungs to blow off debris, stoke a fire, create sounds by voice and by musical instruments.

Around the third millennium B.C. , people began to melt metals such as gold, copper, tin and lead. Higher temperatures were needed requiring large volumes of air to stoke the furnaces: more than what the human lung could provide. Egyptian and Sumerian metallurgists used the wind directed through pipes for their work. Eventually tbellowhese were replaced by hand-operated bellows and then around 1500 B.C. the more efficient foot bellows came into use.

Bellows driven by foot or by water wheel proved a reliable compressor for more than 2,000 years. But as blast furnaces developed, so did the need for increased air compression. In 1762, John Smeaton built a water wheel-driven blowing cylinder that began to replace the bellows. Inventor John Wilkinson introduced an efficient blasting machine in England in 1776 and age of pneumatic energy became universally embraced.

Thus far, air compression was used mostly for the mining and the fabrication of metals. Blowing machines supplied a combustion blast to metallurgic furnaces and ventilation to underground mines. The idea of using compressed air to transmit energy became popular about 1800 when the newly invented pneumatic rock drill was used to connect Italy and France with an 8-mile rail tunnel under Mt. Cenis. This was a super feat for its time and garnered international interest spawning a flurry of inventions from air operated motors to clocks to beer dispensers.

Many engineers theorized compressed air as the energy distribution system of the future. However, electricity advocates held strong to their belief that pneumatic plants would eventually be trumped by electricity. Neither side was truly right and the debate still festers today. Much emphasis is being placed on energy conservation and the use of compressed air. The argument holds true today as it did back then, compressed air is a viable sources of transferring energy and will not go away. It’s prudent use of compressed air, as with any energy source, that is paramount.

Engine block blow off

The use of drilled or open pipe is energy wasteful. For 30 years EXAIR has been helping conserve compressed air with their engineered nozzles. These are designed to provide greater volumes of air than the volume of compressed air used which is a green alternative to drying, cooling, and blow off applications.

If you are interested in conserving your compressed air, one of our application engineers would be happy to assist you. Feel welcomed to give them a call at 1-800-903-9247 or click the chat icon in the upper left hand corner of this page.

Joe Panfalone
Application Engineer
Phone (513) 671-3322
Fax (513) 671-3363
Web: http://www.exair.com
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/exair_jp
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair