Mudathlon, Battlestar Galactica, Transformers…

I’ve written a few blog posts about personal health and gave reference to my hobby of running before as well.  Usually I get a light stretch in and try to eat something dense before a run, but I have no particular “ritual”.

In a few weeks I’ll be competing on a team of 30 or so friends in the Cincinnati Mudathlon.  The Mudathlon is a short 5k run with obstacles and various exercises every 1/10th of a mile.  It should be a good time, and although I run pretty regularly I thought I’d step it up a notch as the race approaches.

Something new that I’m doing is a thorough preparation.  Not just in the short time before I run or workout, but in the entire day beforehand.  I’ve been increasing my caloric intake with foods that have good carbs and starches and I’ve been hydrating as well.  This approach, the thorough preparation, has led to longer runs, less fatigue, and greater performance.  I’m running longer and faster with what feels like less effort.

As I worked through an application I realized that this approach is almost identical to how I determine proper product for an end user.  I have a lot of discussions about compressed air plumbing (see my previous blog about compressed air plumbing mistakes here) and realized that the needs I have when exerting energy (or “doing work” as many of our engineers like to call it) during a run are almost identical to the compressed air needs of an application.

For example:  If my body is low on energy, my output will decrease.  If a compressed air application is underpowered, its output will decrease.  If I’m dehydrated, blood flow is constricted and performance degrades.  If compressed air plumbing is restricted, performance will degrade.

Noticing these similarities I entertained the idea of being a machine (Battlestar Galactica , anyone??) and decided that if I was to ever be a machine I want to be an Autobot.  Possible?  Maybe..  Then again, maybe I’ve been watching too many episodes of Transformers.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
leeevans@exair.com
@EXAIR_LE

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