EXAIR Leads the Way with Standards and Certifications

For over 34 years, EXAIR has been the industry leader in providing Intelligent Compressed Air Products to the industrial marketplace. While much of our focus is to ensure our products are engineered to provide optimal performance, we are also dedicated to manufacturing products that meet a wide range of standards and directives to promote safety in relation to plant personnel.

 

For instance, all of our compressed air operated products meet or exceed OSHA Standards 29 CFR 1910.242(b), requiring that the outlet pressure of an open pipe, nozzle, air gun, etc., when used for cleaning purposes, must remain below 30 PSI when dead-ended against the skin, as well as Standard 29 CFR 1910.95(a) as a way to protect workers from job related injuries related to dangerous sound levels of 90 dBA and higher.

 

 


Many of our products are also CE Compliant, meeting the mandatory requirements for products intended to be sold in the European Economic Area or “EEA”. For example our Electronic Flow Control and Electronic Temperature Control (ETC) meet the EU (European Union) Low Voltage Directive 2006/95/EC.

 

 

EXAIR electrically powered devices, like our Static Eliminators and Digital Flowmeters for example, comply with the “Restriction of Hazardous Substances” or RoHS Directive 2011/65/EU, including the amendment outlined in the European Commission decision L 214/65.

 

 

We are also committed to providing material that supports the conflict mineral free rule to help aid in the relief of illegal trade of exotic materials, like tungsten, gold, tin and tantalum in the DRC region. Using the CMRT 4.20 template, we document our supply resources to ensure we provide conflict free products, as outlined in Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

 

Lastly, the European Union introduced the REACH program – Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals, as a method to register chemical substances being imported into the EU to protect people and the environment, per Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 Title I, Article 3.  Also noted in the program, Title II, Article 7, they state that any product with a substance intended to be released under normal operating conditions, must be registered for quantities totaling more than 1 metric ton per year. Since EXAIR products do not intentionally release or contain any such substances, registration to meet the program is not required.

 

If you have any questions about any of these Standards or Directives or about which EXAIR products comply, please feel free to contact an application engineer for assistance. We’d be happy to help!

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

New Gen4 Super Ion Air Knives Stop Painful Shocks on Printing Operation

Kirk Rudy inkjet

Customer’s Inkjet Machine

I recently received an inquiry from a customer that was having an issue with static on their Kirk Rudy inkjet machine. They print on a variety of different materials for a range of applications, but had some concerns with static that was being generated. Once printed, the material is transported along a conveyor. Operators then remove the pieces by hand. While doing this, they’re receiving shocks as a result of the static, some of which are quite painful! After a little discussion, we determined that a Model 112012 Gen4 Super Ion Air Knife would be the most suitable solution. I recommended the knife to be positioned so that the ionized air stream would pass over the material as it’s coming down the conveyor. The ionized airflow from the Super Ion Air Knife eliminated any residual static, allowing the operators to remove the material without experiencing any painful shocks. This drastically improved workers attitude about performing this operation and eliminated the repeated written complaints that management was getting as a result. Their issue of finding a willing participant to be repeatedly shocked was rectified and the worker quality of life was improved.

EXAIR has just released the new Gen4 Super Ion Air Knives and Ion Bars. The new bar provides a 34% improved performance from previous models, allowing you to achieve the same or better results with less compressed air. These bars and knives are also now CE approved. Some improved features of the Gen4 Super Ion Air Knives are:

-Up to 34% improved performance

-Rugged metal armored and electromagnetically shielded cable

-Integrated ground eliminates additional ground connection

-Durable stainless steel connections to Power Supply

-UL component recognized/CE Compliant

-Modular Power Supply cable eases connections and routing

If you’d like to talk about the benefits of upgrading to the new Gen4 Static Eliminators or have a new application in need of a static eliminating solution, give us a call.

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

EXAIR Accessories – We’ve Got you Covered

When you work with us here at EXAIR, we strive to have all the ancillary items that you might need to make your installation a success, without having to find components at the last minute or perhaps using the wrong sized components. Each specific product line such as Super Air Knives or Line Vac air operated conveyors have specific accessories such as mounting brackets or plumbing kits which EXAIR has made to simplify the installation of those particular products. We also carry generalized accessories which work across all of the product lines so you do not have to use multiple vendors or purchase orders.

Silencing Mufflers – Per OSHA Standard 1910.95(a), a worker must not be exposed to sounds levels above 90 dBA for any eight hour shift of a 40 hour work week.  EXAIR offers several types of mufflers including – Reclassifying, Sintered Bronze, Straight-Through and Heavy Duty.  For reducing the noise associated with an EXAIR E-Vac Generator, Vortex Tube, Cabinet Cooler System, or the exhaust air from cylinders, valves and other air powered equipment, we’ve got a muffler that will help to keep the noise level at an acceptable level.

Mufflers

Solenoid and Manual Valves – The easiest way to reduce compressed air usage and save on operating expense is to turn off the compressed air to a device when it isn’t needed. EXAIR carries a wide assortment of solenoid valves, with offerings in the NEMA 4/4X classification, and supply voltages of 24VDC, 120VAC, and 240VAC.  We also have manual ball valves from 1/4 NPT to 1-1/4 NPT and a foot operated valve, with 1/4 NPT connections.

Valves

Swivel Fittings, Stay Set Hoses and Magnetic Bases – To provide a great degree of flexibility for positioning an EXAIR Super Air Nozzle, Air Jets or Air Amplifiers, EXAIR offers several items.  The Swivel Fittings have 25 degree of movement from the center axis, providing a total of 50 degree of adjustability.  The position is locked in place and holds until adjustment is needed. For applications where frequent re-positioning of the air device is required, the Stay Set Hoses are ideal.  Simply mount the hose close to the application, bend it to the shape preferred, and because the hose has “memory”, it will not creep or bend.  Lastly, the Magnetic Bases are another option for flexible, movable installations.  The base has a on/off valve, and a powerful magnet to hold in any vertical or horizontal mounting arrangement.

Swivels, StaySets,MagBases2

 

Hoses – EXAIR can provide hoses for your application.  For the Line Vac air operated conveyor applications, we offer conveyance hose – a durable, clear reinforced PVC hose, in diameters of 3/8″ to 3″ ID, and lengths up to 50′. On the compressed air side, we can provide 12′ Coiled Hoses with 1/8, 1/4, and 3/8 NPT connections, and also 3/8″ and 1/2″ ID hose in lengths to 50′.

Hoses

Filter Separators, Oil Removal Filters and Pressure Regulators – Perhaps the most important accessories for use on a compressed air device are filters and regulators. Filtering the compressed air of dirt, debris, moisture and oil will help to prevent build up inside the EXAIR products, leading to longer service life, and less time spent cleaning, while providing optimum performance. Regulating the air pressure allows for tuning of the performance, using the proper amount of compressed air to obtain satisfactory results.

Filter and Regualtors

If you have questions regarding accessories for use with any EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air® Product, feel free to contact EXAIR and myself or one of our Application Engineers can help you determine the best solution.

Brian Bergmann
Application Engineer

Send me an email
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Twitter: @EXAIR_BB

Video Blog: Cabinet Cooler Thermostat Installation

Many EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Systems are available with thermostat control, Model 9017 thermostat is used to monitor temperature in the panel as part of a typical thermostat controlled system.  Below is a video on how to physically mount model 9017 thermostat into your panel as part of the overall installation process for NEMA 12 or NEMA 4/4X Cabinet Cooler Systems. Wiring the thermostat will be covered in a separate video.

 

John Ball, Application Engineer
johnball@exair.com

http://www.twitter.com/EXAIR_JB

BTU/hr. vs. Cold Air Temperature

 

Way back in 1983 the founder of EXAIR began producing Vortex Tubes.  Using only compressed air, these small devices produce extremely cold air through the Ranque-Hilsch effect.  As the compressed air enters the Vortex Tube, it begins to spin, reaching over 1,000,000 rpm.  When the spinning airflow reaches the end of the tube, an adjustable percentage is forced to change directions and decrease in diameter.  This decrease in diameter requires a decrease in energy, which the airflow does in the form of heat.  What is left is a hot airstream from one end of the tube and a cold airstream from the other.

An EXAIR Vortex Tube

A key component in the creation of the Vortex Tube effect is the apparatus which starts the spinning of the air inside the tube.  At EXAIR we refer to this piece as the generator, and we can significantly impact the performance of the Vortex Tube based on the dimensional characteristics of this component.

By changing one dimension of the generator we can increase or decrease the total volume of air which flows through the Vortex Tube; and by changing another dimension we can “force” a certain percentage of air to exit the hot end of the Vortex Tube.  These small dimensional changes will result in either a high volume of very cold air, or a low volume of INSANELY cold air.  So, how is this possible?

EXAIR Vortex Tube Performance Chart

To thoroughly answer this, we have to look at something called cold fraction.  A cold fraction is the percentage of air which enters the Vortex Tube and exhausts through the cold end.  An 80% cold fraction will direct 80% of the air which enters the Vortex Tube to exhaust through the cold end.  For example, using a 10 SCFM Vortex Tube with an 80% cold fraction will produce 8 SCFM of flow through the cold end of the tube and 2 SCFM of flow through the hot end of the tube.

Adjusting the cold fraction of a Vortex Tube is as simple as turning the brass valve on the hot end of the tube.  The more the valve is opened, the lower the cold fraction.  As the valve is opened it allows more air to “escape” the Vortex Tube through the hot end, resulting in a lower flow (and also lower temperature air) from the cold end of the tube.  These cold fractions determine the temperature drop of the incoming compressed air, and therefore the outlet temperature of the cold air from the Vortex Tube.  But, this adjustment limited, based on the geometry of the generator mentioned above.

An EXAIR Cooling Kit, complete with Vortex Tube, cold air muffler, generator kit, and automatic drain filter separator.

At EXAIR we produce multiple styles of Vortex Tube generators which produce different cold fraction bandwidths.  Our “C” style generators are better suited to produce a cold fraction between 0-60%, and our “R” style generators are better suited to produce a cold fraction between 40-100%.  These cold fractions are independent of airflow volume, allowing for different outlet temperature ranges with the same inlet compressed air volume.  (You will notice some overlap of cold fraction in the 40-60% range.  Generally, our practice is to use “R” style generators down to 50% cold fraction.)

So, which one is better?

The answer depends on the target temperature needed in the application.  If the absolute coldest temperature is necessary, such as when trying to reach more of a cryogenic type of temperature on a small component or for a test, a “C” style generator may be the best choice.  But, if maximum cooling power is needed, the “R” style generator will prove to have an advantage.  It may seem counter-intuitive at first, but extremely low temperature air from a “C” style generator at less volume will produce less cooling effect than the moderately low temperature air at higher volume from an “R” style generator.

To illustrate this effect, let’s take a look at calculating BTU/hr. of a Vortex Tube.  This is done in the following steps:

  1. Determine inlet airflow to the Vortex Tube.
  2. Determine cold flow value at specified cold fraction.
  3. Use the cold fraction chart to determine temperature drop of incoming compressed air.
  4. Subtract temperature drop from the temperature of the incoming air.
  5. Determine the ΔT between the temperature of the air you are producing and the required temperature in the application.
  6. Place these values into the refrigeration formula shown below.

 

1.0746 x Cold Flow in SCFM (step 2 value) x ΔT in °F (step 5 value) = BTU/hr.

 

Now, using the process above, let’s compare a “C” style Vortex Tube and an “R” style Vortex Tube in terms of BTU/hr.  For this exercise we will compare a model 3425 “C” style Vortex Tube with a model 3225 “R” style Vortex Tube, using a supply pressure of 100 PSIG and a compressed air temperature of 70°F.

Calculations for model 3425 “C” style Vortex Tube

  1. Determine inlet airflow to the Vortex Tube.
    1. 25 SCFM
  2. Determine cold flow value at specified cold fraction.
    1. With a range of 0-60%, we will utilize a value of 40% for this comparison. This will yield a cold flow volume of 10 SCFM.
  3. Use the cold fraction chart to determine temperature drop of incoming compressed air.
  4. Subtract temperature drop from the temperature of the incoming air.
    1. At a supply pressure of 100 PSIG and 40% cold fraction, the temperature drop will be 110°F. With a compressed air temperature of 70°F we will have an outlet temperature of -40°F.
  5. Determine the ΔT between the temperature of the air you are producing and the required temperature in the application.
    1. An application using a “C” style generator will normally have a low target temperature, such as 0°F. This will yield a ΔT of 40°F.
  6. Place these values into the refrigeration formula shown below.

 

1.0746 x Cold Flow in SCFM (10 SCFM) x ΔT in °F (40°F) = 430 BTU/hr.

 

Calculations for model 3225 “R” style Vortex Tube

  1. Determine inlet airflow to the Vortex Tube.
    1. 25 SCFM
  2. Determine cold flow value at specified cold fraction.
    1. With a range of 50-100%, we will utilize a value of 70% for this comparison. This will yield a cold flow volume of 17.5 SCFM.
  3. Use the cold fraction chart to determine temperature drop of incoming compressed air.
  4. Subtract temperature drop from the temperature of the incoming air.
    1. At a supply pressure of 100 PSIG and 70% cold fraction, the temperature drop will be 71°F. With a compressed air temperature of 70°F we will have an outlet temperature of -1°F.
  5. Determine the ΔT between the temperature of the air you are producing and the required temperature in the application.
    1. For most applications using an “R” style generator we aim for a target temperature of 95°F. This will yield a ΔT of 96°F.
  6. Place these values into the refrigeration formula shown below.

 

1.0746 x Cold Flow in SCFM (17.5 SCFM) x ΔT in °F (96°F) = 1,805 BTU/hr.

 

In this comparison we have proven that although the “C” style Vortex Tube will produce a lower temperature airflow, it will not produce a greater cooling effect in an application.  Maximum cooling is achieved with the “R” style generator.  For this reason, 9 out of 10 applications utilize the “R” style 3200 series EXAIR Vortex Tube.  These units produce an extremely cold output air with high volume to effectively remove heat.  The “C” style units are also effective at removing heat, but are normally suited for applications aiming to achieve the lowest temperature airflow possible.

But, no matter the style of generator installed into the Vortex Tube, the cold air output is useful for industrial applications.  Whether the need is for spot cooling electronic components, grinding wheels, milling and drilling equipment, or laser cutting heads, we have a Vortex Tube solution.  If you have an application and would like to discuss an EXAIR Vortex Tube solution, contact our Application Engineers.  We’ll be happy to help.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

EXAIR Vortex Tubes: As Much Cold Air As You Need, As Cold As You Need It

If you’re looking for a reliable, consistent flow of cold air, there’s really no better way to produce it than with a Vortex Tube. There are no moving parts…the air flow and temperature from a particular model, set to a specific cold fraction, is only influenced by the compressed air supply pressure & temperature.

Pressure is easy to control…all you need is a suitable regulator.  Temperature CAN be a variable, depending on your type of compressor, if you have a dryer system (and what type it is,) and sometimes, ambient conditions…if, for example, a long pipe is run through a very hot environment like a foundry or a blast furnace operation.  In cases where supply pressure and/or temperature can be limitations, a higher capacity Vortex Tube, set to a lower Cold Fraction, may be specified.  Which brings me to the user inquiry that inspired today’s blog…

This particular customer uses our Model 3215 Vortex Tubes (15 SCFM, 1,000 Btu/hr) to provide cooling to analyzer systems that monitor certain quality parameters in their manufacturing processes.  The ability to precisely control the temperature in these systems makes for repeatable and accurate measurement of these parameters.   Their compressed air supply in this area is regulated to 80psig, they have a refrigerant-type dryer and climate-controlled facility, so their supply temperature is a consistent 70°F.  You couldn’t ask for better conditions for a successful Vortex Tube application, and they’ve worked great, for years.

Now, due to a plant expansion, they’re installing some of these analyzer systems in a location where the compressed air supply is limited to 60psig.  The required cooling capacity is going to be the same, so the Project Manager reached out to us to see if they could get the same amount of cooling with this new pressure limitation.  Here’s how they’re doing it:

We publish the rated performance of Vortex Tube products for a supply pressure of 100psig.  The Model 3215 Vortex Tube consumes 15 SCFM @100psig and, when set to an 80% Cold Fraction (meaning 80%…or 12 SCFM…of the 15 SCFM supply is directed to the cold end,) the cold air will be 54F colder than the compressed air supply temperature.  Here’s the performance table, so you can follow along:

EXAIR Vortex Tube Performance Table

Now, their supply is at 80psig.  Since air consumption is directly proportional to absolute supply pressure (gauge pressure PLUS atmospheric, which is 14.7psi at sea level,) we can calculate their units’ consumption as follows:

(80psig + 14.7psia) ÷ (100psig + 14.7psia) = 0.83 X 15 SCFM (@100psig) = 12.4 SCFM (@80psig)

So, with a 50°F temperature drop (from a supply @70°F,) they were getting 12.4 SCFM of cold air at 20°F.

As you can see from the table above, they’ll only get a 46°F drop at 60psig…and the flow won’t be as high, either.  So…we’ll need to get more air through the Vortex Tube, right?  Let’s use a little math to solve for what we need.

We still need 20°F cold air from 70°F compressed air, so, at 60psig, we’re looking at a Cold Fraction of ~70%.  And we still need 12.4 SCFM, so:

12.4 SCFM ÷ 0.7 = 17.7 SCFM @60psig (required supply)

Our Model 3230 Vortex Tube uses 30 SCFM @10opsig…at 60psig it’ll consume:

(60psig + 14.7psia) ÷ (100psig + 14.7psia) = 0.65 X 30 SCFM (@100psig) = 19.5 SCFM (@60psig)

That’s about 10% more flow than they needed, theoretically, which was close enough to start.  From there, they “dialed in” performance by regulating the supply pressure and Cold Fraction (see video, below):

If you’d like to find out more, or work through a cooling application, give me a call.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
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Super Air Wipe Controls Coating Thickness On Tubing

A large manufacturing company called looking for a better solution to control the thickness of a curing agent being applied to the outside of tubing used in the automotive industry. The tubing is formed in an extruder and travels through a liquid cooling chamber and then air dried. After the tubing is dried, it is sent to a spray chamber where the curing agent is applied to the exterior. On the exit side of the spray chamber, the customer had installed several flexible air lines placed around the perimeter of the tubing to blow air across the surface to help control the coating thickness. This worked somewhat but they were seeing an increase in the amount of rejected material as the air pattern was sporadic and uneven, which caused streaking and dry spots in certain areas of the tubing. They reviewed our web site and familiarized themselves with our Air Wipes but were unsure of the best design and size to fit their need so they reached out for assistance.

After further discussing the process, their tube O.D. sizes range from 3/8″ – 1/2″, making our 1″ Air Wipe the ideal solution. As far as the design, the Standard or Super Air Wipe, I recommended they use our Model # 2451 Super Air Wipe kit due to the aluminum construction and stainless steel wired braided hoses being able to withstand the potential temperature in the area of 200°F. The kit includes a filter separator to remove any water or contaminants in the supply and a pressure regulator which would allow them to control the flow and force of the exiting air, to help “dial” it in to fit the demand of the application.

Super Air Wipe is available in sizes from 1/2″ up to 11″ in Aluminum construction and up to 4″ in Stainless Steel construction.

 

EXAIR Air Wipes features a split design, which can easily be clamped around the material, to provide a 360° uniform airflow, perfect for treating the surface of round shapes, like extruded tubing. If you have an application where you are needing to dry, cool or clean the outside of a pipe, hose or cable, contact an application engineer for help making the best product selection.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

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