Video Blog: Deep Hole Vac-U-Gun Demo for Cleaning Blind Holes

Cleaning out blind holes can be tricky and hazardous to your operators due to flying debris. There’s no better solution for cleaning blind holes than EXAIR’s Deep Hole Vac-U-Gun. The Deep Hole Vac-U-Gun allows you to remove the debris simply and easily, while keeping it contained in the included filter bag.

In the video below, I’ve simulated a blind hole using some 5/8″ tubing. As you can see, the debris is quickly blown up and out of the hole while captured into the filter bag without any mess or hassle.

The Deep Hole Vac-U-Gun is in stock and backed by EXAIR’s Unconditional 30 Day Guarantee. If you’d like to discuss getting one in for your facility give us a call. We can have one shipped out same day with a PO received by 2:00 ET for delivery anywhere in the US.

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@EXAIR_TD
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

Static Eliminator Selection Example

I like jigsaw puzzles. I start with the outside…there’s something to be said for establishing the boundaries of any project…but I don’t necessarily work my way in from there. Oftentimes, a number of same-colored pieces go together quickly, and I make a little part of the big picture somewhere in the middle. If it’s a big enough picture and/or if there’s a sufficient number of pieces, I might get a few of those little parts going on, until some of them get joined together. Once that happens, the big picture develops faster & faster, and before I know it, the puzzle is solved.

As an Application Engineer for EXAIR, a jigsaw puzzle is an apt analogy for assisting a customer in selecting the right solution to an application. A recent situation proved what a good analogy this is: a caller from a custom label making shop needed to eliminate static from a bunch of thin Mylar film that was die cut into special little shapes so they could be laid out in specific arrangements. You know…like a jigsaw puzzle!

Now, there aren’t many better ways to generate a static charge than doing ANYTHING to Mylar. The magnitude of static charge created by the cutting process is downright vicious. As difficult as it was to put the first piece in place, it was IMPOSSIBLE to keep it there when they put the NEXT piece down adjacent to it. Same thing with the piece after that, and the piece after that, etc. They needed something to remove the static, and that something turned out to be an EXAIR Ion Air Knife. By installing a Model 8106 6″ Gen4 Standard Ion Air Knife along one side, they were able to gently blow a ‘whisper’ of ionized air that moved the freshly cut pieces from the die cutter’s platen so the operator could then lay them out to make the desired label design.

Gen4 Standard Ion Air Knife

So, how did we arrive at the Gen4 Standard Ion Air Knife? Wouldn’t the more efficient & quieter Super Ion Air Knife be the “go to” solution? In an awful lot of cases, it certainly is. A couple of things made the Standard Ion Air Knife more attractive here:

Profile-wise, a Gen4 Standard Ion Air Knife takes up less than half the space of a Gen4 Super Ion Air Knife.
  • Compressed air consumption: if this were an application for a continuous 36″ wide ionized air curtain in a fast moving product application with a high static charge, we’d have talked about the difference in consumption, at a high pressure (like 80psig) for the two different Ion Air Knives:
    • 36″ Super Ion Air Knife: 104.4 SCFM, or 12,528,000 standard cubic feet per year*
    • 36″ Standard Ion Air Knife: 123 SCFM, or 15,350,400 standard cubic feet per year*

*Eight hours a day, five days a week, 52 weeks a year. Assuming a compressed air cost of $0.25 per 1,000 standard cubic feet, that’s an operating cost difference of:

(15,350,400 – 12,528,000) SCF X $0.25/1,000 SCF = $705.60 per year.

  • In this case, though, it’s a 6″ Ion Air Knife, blowing a short puff of ionized air a few times a minute, at about 5psig supply pressure…anything more would blow those small mylar pieces all over the place:
    • 6″ Super Ion Air Knife: 1.85 SCFM, or 23,088 standard cubic feet per year*
    • 6″ Standard Ion Air Knife: 1.5 SCFM, or 18,720 standard cubic feet per year*

*Three 2-second cycles per minute, eight hours a day, five days a week, 52 weeks a year. Assuming a compressed air cost of $0.25 per 1,000 standard cubic feet, that’s an operating cost difference of:

(23,088 – 18,720) SCF X $0.25/1,000 SCF = $1.09 per year.

  • Sound level: again, this would be a prime consideration if they were operating at higher supply pressures. But, at the lower pressure necessitated by this application, the Standard Ion Air Knife’s 66dBA, a second or two at a time, is hardly noticeable.
  • Price: The purchase price (2021 pricing) of the Standard Ion Air Knife was ~17% less than the Super Ion Air Knife. Normally, we’ll talk about the operating cost…but not when the difference (see above) is just over a buck a year.
  • Air flow pattern: Since a curtain of ionized air was a good fit for this application, an Ion Air Knife (Super or Standard) was the logical choice. If a more concentrated flow was called for, we’d have used an Ion Air Cannon or Ion Air Jet. If they were looking for something handheld, a Gen4 Ion Air Gun or Intellistat Ion Air Gun would have been offered. For static dissipation on the entire circumference or perimeter of a part, we’d have talked about a Super Ion Air Wipe. The size & shape of the air flow, in fact, is frequently where we “start the negotiations” on product selection…sort of analogous to starting with the outside border pieces of a jigsaw puzzle!

EXAIR Corporation has a broad range of Static Eliminators, that are just one part of our diverse offering of Intelligent Compressed Air Products. If you’ve got questions, we’ve got answers…give me a call.

Russ Bowman, CCASS

Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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Jigsaw Puzzle (detail) photo courtesy of James Petts Creative Commons License

How to Position and Mount your Air Knife

Today I wanted to start a series about installing EXAIR products, so I figured starting with our selection of hard hitting air knives was the best place to start!

We talk to users, and potential users all the time about how to install an Air Knives. And the answer is…it depends. But, it’s almost always quick and easy.

The EXAIR Super Air Knife. There are a few ways to hold one in place:
*There are 1/4″-20 tapped holes, every 2″ along the bottom. These can be used to bolt it to just about anything you want to bolt it to.
*The 1/4″-20 cap screws can also be replaced with fasteners of sufficient length to allow use of a bracket. In fact, this is what we use for…
*The Universal Air Knife Mounting System – it’s a quick and convenient way to support an Air Knife. It’s especially beneficial to precisely position the Super Air Knife for optimum performance.
*Last but not least, Super Air Knives 24″ and longer need to be plumbed to both ends for proper performance. If you hard pipe it in, it’ll be as well supported as the piping.

EXAIR Super Air Knives are easy to install, no matter what the length, or application.
EXAIR Super Air Knives are easy to install, no matter what the length, or application.

The best way to mount a Super Air Knife in a blowing application so that you achieve the maximum force, time in contact and of course, effectiveness.

There is a term we use, “counter-flow”, to describe the opposing travel of target material/conveyor (red arrow) and the airflow coming from an Air Knife (blue arrow). By having opposing flows, the Air Knife is able to blow the debris, contamination, water or other fluid back into the direction from which it came. Sometimes a catch pan can be used to collect and re-use the fluid.

Air Knife Aimed in the opposite direction of the belts travel. (Counter Flow)

Finally, in the photo above, note that the Super Air Knife is mounted up-side down. We generally recommend this kind of orientation with the cap of the Super Air Knife being closest to the material being blown off. This allows you to get the air knife a bit lower and closer to the target material. The lower the angle, the better. This allows for a longer time in contact between the Super Air Knife and the target material. When the target material spends more time in the high velocity flow, the more likely you are able to impart the desired effect whether that be drying, cooling, blowoff or static elimination. To find a good mounting angle to start, I recommend customers use the front, angled edge of the Super Air Knife cap as a guide for what part of the Super Air Knife to keep parallel to the moving surface. This is a great reference from which blowing angle can be optimized.

Poor Position Good Position

If you’d like to find out more about how easy it is to install an EXAIR Compressed Air Product, give me a call.

Jordan Shouse
Application Engineer

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Super Air Knife to the Rescue in Machining

Home-made blow-off device

As machined parts require tighter tolerances, the surface has to stay clear during turning operations.  A customer that had a CNC machine needed to make a metal tube with a specific diameter.  The metal tube was 17 ½” (445mm) long.  They made their own blow-off “tree” to keep the surface clean from shavings.  They used five open ports to blow at the part surface (reference photo above).  When they started using their home-made device, they were not getting a consistent cleaning during operation.  They wanted to speak to an expert in this type of area, and they contacted EXAIR to see if we could improve their process.

With a series of open nozzles, it is very difficult to get a consistent force along a linear line.  The air becomes very turbulent, which has changing directions of air flow.  It creates a hazardous noise exposure to the operators, and it also wastes compressed air which costs the company a large amount of money to use.  With laminar air, the path flows in the same direction.  This creates a very consistent force with less noise.  Since air is invisible, I like to use water to show the difference.  The photo below shows turbulent and laminar flows. 

Turbulent to Laminar Water

For linear blow-offs, EXAIR offers a wide range of Super Air Knives.  They give a laminar flow pattern along the entire length.  We have stocked lengths from 3” (76mm) up to 108” (2.74 meters) in different materials.  A benefit of the Super Air Knife is the high amplification ratio of 40:1.  This means that for every 1 part of compressed air, it will entrain 40 parts of ambient air.  So, they are very efficient, safe, and effective.  For the application above, I recommended the model 110218 18” Super Air Knife Kit to cover the length of the metal tube.  It has an 18” (457mm) wide air stream that is very powerful to remove chips during the turning operation.  The kit includes a filter, regulator, and shim set.  The filter will remove contaminants from the compressed air system to keep the surface clean.  The shim set and regulator provide the ability to adjust the air to the ideal force level to remove the debris from the surface of the tube. 

Super Air Knife Kits include a Shim Set, Filter Separator, and Pressure Regulator.

One of the biggest attributes that the EXAIR Super Air Knives can offer is that they use much less compressed air than a series of open nozzles. With the engineered design, it can entrain large amounts of ambient air which means that less compressed air is required.  For the nozzle tree, it was using 105 SCFM of air at 80 PSIG.  The model 110218 only requires 52.2 SCFM at 80 PSIG. That is a difference of 52.8 SCFM; half the amount of compressed air as the home-made nozzles. 

Once they installed the Super Air Knife, the first thing that they noticed was the reduction of noise. The model 110218 Super Air Knife only has a noise level of 69 dBA at 80 PSIG, compared to a noise level of an open port which was over 100 dBA. By replacing the nozzle tree with the Super Air Knife, this company…

1. reduced air consumption

2. saved money

3. reduced noise levels

4. increased the effective blowing force

If you find yourself using a home-made blow-off device, you can be creating a hazardous, costly, ineffective method to “do a job”.  Since precision was needed for the company above, they were delighted to contact an expert in this area.  You can also improve your blow-off device by contacting an Application Engineer at EXAIR for assistance.  We would be glad to help. 

John Ball
Application Engineer
Email: johnball@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_jb