Shade-Tree Mechanics and EXAIR Products

EXAIR most often sells business to business, but we also sell to individuals who need the right tools for their home projects.

If you frequent our blog it is no secret that I tend to have projects going on outside of work and I generally find a reason to have an EXAIR product when I am doing them. The first EXAIR application I had at home was in fact utilizing an E-Vac to build a motorcycle brake bleeder.  I still use that to this day, it is on my bench ready to help me rebuild my rear brake system on my bike once I decide to do it. I’ve blogged about that before. The most recent application I had was working on an early 1970’s Jeep with a close friend. He inherited the Jeep from his dad who no longer wanted to work on it. The Jeep hadn’t run in over a year and the original reason for parking it was ticking in the motor.

Broken parts removed – Time for cleaning.

Sure enough, once he got it up and running with some fresh gas and cleaning up the carb the tick had not gone away but he was able to narrow down that it was in fact coming from under the valve cover, so off it came.  We discovered that one of the bridges that hold down the valve rocker was broken, parts were ordered and we started cleaning everything off. The fix could all be had from right up top under the valve cover and should be easy enough once parts were in.  We cleaned up all the oil, removed all the bridges as well as the pushrods.

When we were removing the bolts from the valve cover and bridges there was a good amount of “sludge” and debris around the bolt holes.  When cleaning this all up some did go into the holes and we really wanted to try and keep all debris up top rather than going down into the motor. We noticed some crud around the top of the pushrod holes so we waited until we could use an Atto Back Blow Nozzle on a VariBlast Compact Safety Air Gun to pass down through the pushrod holes and effectively blow any and all debris back up to the top of the motor.  We also were able to use it on the blind holes of the bridge bolts and remove any fines or buildup that had fallen into the hole.

Cleaned up and ready for reassembly

After we were done cleaning up it was time to reinstall with the new part and having a clean top end made the job that much easier. Buttoned everything up, did an oil change, and then the Jeep fired right up with no ticking noise in the motor. Now he just has to clean up some wiring and get tags to put this classic back on the road.

Having the right tool for the job is always the best solution. Whether you are working on a car at home, or if you are career certified mechanic in a shop, the same goes across any industry. When using compressed air in an application EXAIR is the company that can supply you with the right tool to get the job done efficiently, safely, and quickly.

If you would like to discuss any point of use compressed air application, please contact an Application Engineer.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer / Shade-tree mechanic
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

The Importance Of Properly Sized Compressed Air Supply Lines

EXAIR Corporation manufactures a variety of engineered compressed air products that have been solving myriad applications in industry for almost 37 years now.  In order for them to function properly, though, they have to be supplied with enough compressed air flow, which means the compressed air supply lines have to be adequately sized.

A 20 foot length of 1/4″ pipe can handle a maximum flow capacity of 18 SCFM, so it’s good for a Model 1100 Super Air Nozzle (uses 14 SCFM @80psig) or a Model 110006 6″ Super Air Knife (uses 17.4 SCFM @80psig,) but it’s going to starve anything requiring much more air than those products.  Since compressed air consumption of devices like EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air Products is directly proportional to inlet pressure, we can use the flow capacity of the pipe, the upstream air pressure, and the known consumption of the EXAIR product to calculate the inlet pressure of a starved product.  This will give us an idea of its performance as well.

Let’s use a 12″ Super Air Knife, with the 20 foot length of 1/4″ pipe as an example.  The ratio formula is:

(P2 ÷ P1) C1 = C2, where:

P2 – absolute pressure we’re solving for*

P1 – absolute pressure for our published compressed air consumption, or C1*

C1 – known value of compressed air consumption at supply pressure P1

C2 – compressed air consumption at supply pressure P2

*gauge pressure plus 14.7psi atmospheric pressure

This is the typical formula we use, since we’re normally solving for compressed air consumption at a certain supply pressure, but, rearranged to solve for inlet pressure assuming the consumption will be the capacity of the supply line in question:

(C2 P1) ÷ C1 = P2

[18 SCFM X (80psig + 14.7psia)] ÷ 34.8 SCFM = 49psia – 14.7psia = 34.3psig inlet pressure to the 12″ Super Air Knife.

From the Super Air Knife performance chart…

This table is found on page 22 of EXAIR Catalog #32.

…we can extrapolate that the performance of a 12″ Super Air Knife, supplied with a 20 foot length of 1/4″ pipe, will perform just under the parameters of one supplied at 40psig:

  • Air velocity less than 7,000 fpm, as compared to 11,800 fpm*
  • Force @6″ from target of 13.2oz total, instead of 30oz*
  • *Performance values for a 12″ length supplied with an adequately sized supply line, allowing for 80psig at the inlet to the Air Knife.

Qualitatively speaking, if you hold your hand in front of an adequately supplied Super Air Knife, it’ll feel an awful lot like sticking your hand out the window of a moving car at 50 miles an hour.  If it’s being supplied with the 20 foot length of 1/4″ pipe, though, it’s going to feel more like a desk fan on high speed.

The type of supply line is important too.  A 1/4″ pipe has an ID of about 3/8″ (0.363″, to be exact) but a 1/4″ hose has an ID of only…you guessed it…1/4″.  Let’s say you have 20 feet of 1/4″ hose instead, which will handle only 7 SCFM of compressed air flow capacity:

[7 SCFM X (80psig + 14.7psia)] ÷ 34.8 SCFM = 19psia – 14.7psia = 4.3psig inlet pressure to the 12″ Super Air Knife.

Our Super Air Knife performance chart doesn’t go that low, but, qualitatively, that’s going to generate a light breeze coming out of the Super Air Knife.  This is why, for good performance, it’s important to follow the recommendations in the Installation Guide:

This table comes directly from the Installation & Operation Instructions for the Super Air Knife.
All Installation Guides for EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air Products contain recommended air supply line sizes for this very reason.  If you have any questions, though, about proper compressed air supply, give me a call.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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Process Improvement, ROI and Safety from One Air Nozzle

Process improvement projects can be detailed, complex, expensive, and take a long time to prove their worth.  Today, I want to tell you about one that WAS NOT ANYTHING like that.

A metal stamping company used compressed air to blow their products from their dies.  They did what many do – they ran some copper tubing, and aimed it at the platen so it would properly eject the parts as they were stamped.  They KNEW it was loud, and they suspected it was inefficient as well.

After discussing the setup and seeing a picture of it (the one on the left, below,) I recommended installing a few engineered Super Air Nozzles to lower the noise levels considerably.  Boy, was I wrong.  About “a few” nozzles, that is…turns out, they only needed one Model 1122-9212 2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle with 12″ Stay Set Hose.  The copper tubes come from a manifold that already had 1/4 NPT ports – installation took a matter of minutes.  Nothing detailed, complex, or expensive about it:

This loud & inefficient copper tubing blowoff was just a compression fitting (and a Model 1122 2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle) away from being quiet and efficient.

It didn’t take much longer than that to prove its worth either: as soon as they noticed how much the noise level went down on THIS press, they ordered them for the other eighteen presses in their facility as well.

The 1/4″ copper tubes blew continuously from a pressure regulator set @60psig…the three of them theoretically consumed a total of ~80 SCFM.  The Model 1122, at 60psig supply, consumes only 17.2 SCFM.  Simple return on investment was as follows:

  • 80 SCFM was costing them $48.00 a week
    • 80 SCFM X 60 min/hr X 8 hr/day X 5 days/week X $0.25/1,000 CFM = $48.00
  • 17.2 SCFM, using the same formula, only costs $10.32 a week (I’ll let you do the math; it’s good practice.)
  • They saved $37.68 a week.  The Model 1122-9212 costs $116.00 (2020 pricing) – that means that each of them paid for themselves in just a hair over three weeks.
  • $37.68 x 50 work weeks per year = $1884.00 saved annually per nozzle
  • $1884 x 18 (the number of presses) = $33,912 saved annually 

Considering they also didn’t have to listen to those very loud open ended copper tube blowoffs, I think you’ll have to agree it made for a very good investment.  They did. The new nozzle runs at 77 decibels, a comfortable level and well below the OSHA standard [29 CFR – 1910.95(a)] for allowable noise exposure.

If you’d like to find out how EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air Products can save you money on compressed air – and save everyone’s hearing – give me a call.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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EXAIR’s Return on Investment For One Engineered Air Nozzle is Amazing!

Return on Investment (ROI) is a measure of the gain (preferably) or loss generated relative to the amount of money that was invested.  ROI is typically expressed as a percentage and is generally used for financial decisions, examining the profitability of a company, or comparing different investments.  It can also be used to evaluate a project or process improvement to decide whether spending money on a project makes sense.  The formula is shown below-

ROI
ROI Calculation
  • A negative ROI says the project would result in an overall loss of money
  • An ROI at zero is neither a loss or gain scenario
  • A positive ROI is a beneficial result, and the larger the value the greater the gain
1100group
Our catalog publishes most products’ performance and specification data for a compressed air supply pressure of 80psig.

Example – installing a Super Air Nozzles (14 SCFM compressed air consumption) in place of 1/4″ open pipe (33 SCFM of air consumption consumption) .  Using the Cost Savings Calculator on the EXAIR website, model 1100 nozzle will save $1,710 in energy costs. The model 1100 nozzle costs $42, assuming a $5 compression fitting and $45 in labor to install, the result is a Cost of Investment of $92.00. The ROI calculation for Year one is-

ROI2

ROI = 1,759% – a very large and positive value.  Payback time is only 13 working days!

If you have questions regarding ROI and need help in determining the gain and cost from invest values for a project that includes an EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air® Product, feel free to contact EXAIR and myself or one of our Application Engineers can help you determine the best solution.

Jordan Shouse
Application Engineer

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