Super Air Amplifiers – Adjustability for Blowoff, Drying, Cooling, Circulation and Ventilation

The Super Air Amplifier is a powerful, efficient, and quiet air mover. Applications currently in place include blowoff, drying, cooling, circulation and ventilation. Sizes from 3/4″ to 8″ are available to best match the air volume that is necessary to achieve the process goals. There are a couple of ways to change the performance of the Super Air Amplifier if either a small or large change to the output flow is required.AirAmplifiers

The chart below shows the Total Output Flow for each of the 6 models. As an example, the Model 120021 or 121021, when operated at 60 PSIG of compressed air supply, will have a total output flow of 120 SCFM. These same devices when operated at 80 PSIG will have a total flow of 146 SCFM. By simply using a pressure regulation device on the compressed air supply, the output performance can be tuned to match the desired outcome.

Capture

For those applications where much greater flow and/or force is needed, the option of installing a thicker shim is available.  The Super Air Amplifiers are supplied with a 0.003″ shim installed (the 8″ model 120028, has a 0.009″ shim as standard) and can be fitted with shims of thicknesses of 0.006″ or 0.009″ (the 8″ model has an optional 0.015″ shim.) Installation of a thicker shim increases the slotted air gap, allowing for a greater amount of controlled air flow.  As a general rule, doubling the shim thickness will double the air flow rates.

Super Air Amplifier Shims

Patented* Shim Design for Super Air Amplifiers

The Super Air Amplifier design provides for a constant, high velocity outlet flow across the entire cross sectional area,.  The balanced outlet flow minimizes wind shear to produce sound levels that are typically three times quieter than other air movers. By regulating the compressed air supply pressure and use of the optional shims, adjustability and flexibility of the unit is wide ranging and sure to meet your process needs.

If you have questions regarding the Super Air Amplifier, or would like to talk about any EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air® Product, feel free to contact EXAIR and myself or one of our Application Engineers can help you determine the best solution.

Brian Bergmann
Application Engineer

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*Patent #5402938

About Double Acting Reciprocating Air Compressors

My colleague, Lee Evans, wrote a blog “About Single Acting Reciprocating Compressors”, and I wanted to extend that conversation to a more efficient relative, the double acting reciprocating compressor.   As you see in the chart below, this type of compressor falls within the same family under the category of positive displacement compressors.

Compressor Types

Positive displacement compressors increase air pressure by reducing air volume within a confined space.  The reciprocating type of air compressor uses a motor that turns a crank which pushes a piston inside a cylinder; like the engine in your car.  In a basic cycle, an intake valve opens to allow the ambient air into the cylinder, the gas gets trapped, and once it is compressed by the piston, the exhaust valve opens to discharge the compressed volume into a tank.  This method of compression happens for both the single and double acting reciprocating compressors.  With a single acting compressor, the air is compressed only on the up-stroke of the piston inside the cylinder.  The double acting compressor compresses the air on both the up-stroke and the down-stroke of the piston, doubling the capacity of a given cylinder size.  This “double” compression cycle is what makes this type of air compressor very efficient.  A single acting compressor will have an operating efficiency between 22 – 24 kW/100 cfm of air while the double acting compressor has an operating efficiency between 15 – 16 kW/100 cfm.  Therefore, electricity cost is less with a double-acting reciprocating air compressor to make the same amount of compressed air.

To explore the internals a bit closer, the mechanical linkage used to move the piston is slightly different as well as the additional intake and exhaust valves.   Instead of the connecting rod being attached directly to the piston as seen inside a single acting compressor, a crosshead is added between the compression piston and the connecting rod (view picture below).  The rod that connects the crosshead to the compression piston can be sealed to keep the cylinder completely encapsulated.  For every rotation of the electric motor, the air is being compressed twice.  With the added heat of compression, the double acting compressors are generally water-cooled.  Also, with the added mechanism between the crank and the piston, the rotational speeds are typically less.  Because of the larger size, water jackets, and added parts, the initial cost is more expensive than the single acting compressor, but the efficiency is much higher.

Double Acting Reciprocating Air Compressor

Double acting compressors are generally designed for rugged 100% continuous operations.  Dubbed the work horse of the compressor family, they are also known for their long service life.  They are commonly used in high pressure services in multistage styles and can come in lubricated and non-lubricated configurations.   With the dual compression, slow speed and inter-cooling, it makes this type of air compressor very proficient in making compressed air.

John Ball
Application Engineer
Email: johnball@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_jb

 

Photos:  used from Compressed Air Challenge Handbook

EXAIR Line Vac Promotion Thru October 2017!

EXAIR will be giving away a free 2” Super Air Nozzle with the purchase of any EXAIR Line Vac from September 1st through October 31st, 2017.  This special promotion will apply to all versions of Line Vac orders, whether aluminum, stainless steel, heavy duty, threaded/non-threaded, or 316SS sanitary flanged.  Order within the promotional period and receive the free model 1122, a value of $65.00! The 2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle is more durable than plastic flat nozzles, operates at lower noise levels and produces a powerful blast of compressed air in a laminar sheet.

EXAIR’s Line Vac family

Line Vacs provide a fast, easy way to pneumatically transfer dry materials from one location to another.  They eliminate the need to have personnel manually transferring materials via bag, super sac, or bucket-and-ladder setups.  Doing so reduces worker fatigue and allows conveyance to occur simultaneously with other process operations.

Line Vac removing trimmed scrap from label making application

What kind of an impact can this have?  Here’s a link to a recent blog post where an EXAIR Line Vac saved the end user from having to shut down their conveyor to allow cleaning of spilled material underneath.  And here’s a link to an application using Line Vacs to empty and refill a large tank full of desiccant.  And here’s a link to an application where we customized a Line Vac for conveyance of dog bedding material.  You get the idea…

Depending on application parameters such as bulk density of the material (lbs/ft³ or kg/m³), conveyance height/distance, and required conveyance rate, we can size a Line Vac properly through the support of our Application Engineers who have years of experience working with these products and their implementation into industrial solutions.

The EXAIR Line Vac Promotion – now through October 31st

We’re here to help you find a pneumatic conveyance solution for your application, and earn a free nozzle in the process.  Contact our Application Engineers for assistance today.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

Pressure Drop and its Relationship to Compressed Air

“Nothing happens until something moves.”
-Albert Einstein

OK; that’s how I started last week’s blog on stuff happening when heat moves (or, more accurately, is transferred.)  This week, it’s going to apply to pressure, and the movement (and/or lack thereof) of air in a pressurized system.  There are two primary reasons why a discussion of this is important in the context of the use of compressed air products:

The first reason is about ensuring sufficient air flow to get the job done:  As compressed air flows (or moves) through the system, it encounters friction with the inside wall of the line, be it pipe, tube, hose, etc.  Several factors affect this – the diameter and length of the line, the number of directional changes (think elbows,) and the finish surface of the inside wall.  The most important of these is the diameter…hopefully, the original plumbing layout didn’t use any more twists & turns than necessary, and no matter how hard you try, you’ll never polish the inside of a 1″ pipe enough to allow the same air flow as a 2″ pipe.  The length, as they say, “is what it is.”  Unless you can move your air compressor closer to the point(s) of usage (or the points of usage closer to your air compressor,) there’s not much you can do about this…unless, of course, you want to consider intermediate storage.

Let’s assume that your supply side, i.e., your compressor and main header(s), are adequately sized.  The usual pressure drop challenge, as it relates to sufficient air flow, is the air line from the header, to the product.  Put simply, the longer this has to be, the larger (in diameter) it’s going to have to be.  Here’s a video that demonstrates the performance changes that come with different length (and diameter) supply lines:

The second reason has to do with where a pressure drop occurs, relative to the point of use.  Common sense dictates the more energy you get to the point of use, the better & more efficient the use of that energy will be.  The potential energy of compressed air is no exception.  Consider these two blow off methods:

They may be loud, but they sure are inefficient…

With open end blow offs, like the copper tubing and modular hose shown above, the pressure drop occurs upstream, in the supply line itself…if you were to measure the pressure at the copper tubes’ manifold (left) or at any point in the modular hose (right,) it’s not going to be very high…it’s all being vented to atmospheric pressure through the open ends.  Depending on the size, and quantity, of the discharge holes, the pressure may build up a little, but if it gets too high, it’ll blow that modular hose apart…it’s not made to withstand any significant pressure.

Engineered solutions (like EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air Products) are the efficient, quiet, and safe choice.

Engineered blow off devices, on the other hand, keep the air compressed right up to point of discharge, keeping the pressure drop (e.g., energy transfer) close to the point of use, for maximum efficiency.

If you’d like to find out more about optimizing your compressed air system for efficiency, performance, noise reduction and safety, give me a call.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
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Proper Supply Lines are Key to Air Knife Performance

A few weeks back I chatted with a customer on an Air Knife application where they were using our 48″ aluminum Super Air Knife to remove leftover dough from a baking pan. The knife was working somewhat, but they were seeing some residual dough being left in certain areas on the pans due to what they perceived as “weak” airflow. After reading through our catalog and installation guide, they noticed that there were available shim sets that would allow them to increase the gap setting to get more force and flow out of the knife.

Available in lengths from 3″ to 108″ in aluminum, 303ss or 316ss construction

Our aluminum Super Air Knives are shipped from stock with a .002″ shim installed. The optional shim set includes a .001″, .003″ and .004″ shim that would allow you to decrease or increase the performance. By operating the Super Air Knife with the .003″ shim installed, this would increase the force and flow by 1.5 times and using the .004″ shim would double the performance. Sometimes achieving greater force and flow may be required but with the customer saying they were seeing weak airflow, it seemed there may be a restriction on the supply side.

Super Air Knife with Shim Set

I asked the customer how the knife was plumbed and what size supply lines he was using. He advised that they were plumbing air to all 3 inlets on the bottom of the knife but they were using 3/4″ hose with a run of about 30′. I advised the customer that plumbing air to all 3 inlets is required for a 48″ Super Air Knife but we actually recommend 3/4″ Schedule 40 Pipe up to 10′ or 1″ pipe up to 50′. If using hose, he would need to go up a size to maintain a large enough ID to carry the volume required for the unit. In his case, since the length of the supply is close to 30′, he would need to use 1-1/4″ ID hose.

Improper plumbing line size is a common issue we deal with here at EXAIR. Using undersized supply lines can cause excessive pressure drops because they aren’t able to carry the volume of air necessary to properly supply the compressed air device. In this particular application, if the customer were to install either the .003″ or .004″ shim, while keeping his current plumbing size, the performance would actually be worse as now the lines are even more undersized due to the increased air volume requirement from the larger Super Air Knife gap.

If you are looking to change the performance with one of our Air Knives or if you would like to discuss a particular application or product, please contact one of our application engineers for assistance at 800-903-9247.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

Super Air Amplifiers vs. Fans – Why are Amplifiers More Effective at Cooling & Drying?

Super Air Amplifier

Super Air Amplifiers entrain ambient air at a rate of 25:1!!

When seeking a suitable solution for cooling or drying your parts, you may be tempted to try out a low-cost fan to get the job done. While fans do a great job of keeping you cool during the warmer months, they’re not the best choice for cooling or drying parts. Have you ever noticed that when standing in front of a fan the flow pattern is not consistent? This is due to the nature in which the fan blades create that air flow by “slapping” the air as they spin rapidly. The air flow that exits from the fan is turbulent and is not as effective as the laminar air flow pattern that is produced by EXAIR’s Super Air Amplifier. The Super Air Amplifier utilizes a patented shim design that maintains a critical position of the air gap and creates a laminar air flow pattern that will exit the outlet of the unit.

fan data2

In addition to providing laminar air flow more conducive for cooling and drying, the Super Air Amplifier provides much more air that can be directed at the target. A standard 2.36” x 2.36” DC operated fan provides anywhere from 12-27 CFM at the outlet, depending on the model. For comparison, a Model 120022 2” Super Air Amplifier will provide 341 SCFM at the outlet when operated at 80 psig. At just 6” away from the outlet, this value increases to 1,023 SCFM!! When compared to the fan outlet air flow, the Super Air Amplifier produces more than an 1,100% increase in air volume!

When replacing a fan with a Super Air Amplifier, the process time can be dramatically reduced. The increase in air volume significantly reduces the contact time that your part will need to be exposed to the air flow, allowing you to increase your line speed and decrease the overall production cost of the part. This is achieved due to the nature in which a Super Air Amplifier draws in air from the ambient environment. At amplification ratios as great as 25:1, the Super Air Amplifier is the best way to move a lot of air volume across the part with very little compressed air supplied to it. Check out the video below for a good representation of the air entrainment of a Super Air Amplifier.

In addition to providing laminar airflow and increasing the volume of air, the Super Air Amplifier is also infinitely adjustable through one of two ways. Each size Super Air Amplifier has a shim set that can be purchased. Swapping out the stock shim for a thinner shim will reduce the compressed air consumption, force, and flow. Installing a thicker shim will increase it. Additionally, the force and flow can also be adjusted by regulating the input supply pressure through the use of a pressure regulator. With sizes ranges from ¾” up to 8”, there’s a Super Air Amplifier for all applications. Give us a call today to see how you can optimize your process by replacing your fans with one or more Super Air Amplifiers.

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@Exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

EXAIR Provides Same Day Solutions For Customers In Need

Solving customer problems by shipping product the same day is a common occurrence at EXAIR. Here is another example.

 

EXAIR Cabinet Cooler installed on a control panel in a distribution center for hygienic products.

As companies grow and add more personnel, the details of projects and solutions can get lost if not recorded well.  Newer employees may not have knowledge of solution specifics, and unknown details can be hard to discover, especially in larger organizations.  An example of this happened recently when one of our customers contacted me about the Cabinet Cooler shown in the image above.

The NEMA 12 Cabinet Cooler was working flawlessly and had been for some time.  As temperatures rose, however, other machines in this facility began to experience overheating conditions leading to machine downtime, decreased throughput, and increased stress on operations personnel.

One of the maintenance workers noticed that the cabinet with the EXAIR Cabinet Cooler was functioning properly, so they did a quick Google search of the product.  They were met with numerous postings about the theory of operation for Cabinet Coolers and Vortex Tubes, how-to videos for installation/thermostats/side mount kits, and our blog site with countless application solutions provided by our products.

Figuring they’d found the right place, they reached out to me via email and shared their story.  And, what they ultimately needed from me was help identifying which Cabinet Coolers they had on hand to mimic the solution in other, identical machines.

Another angle of the Cabinet Cooler in this application.

Thankfully they provided the image above, which shows a label near the compressed air inlet designating the compressed air consumption (at 100 PSIG).  (See below)

The critical piece of information we needed to determine the model number of this Cabinet Cooler (in the red circle).

Based on this label and the dimensions of the Cabinet Cooler, I was able to identify this as our model 4025 NEMA 12 Cabinet Cooler, which is part of the larger, complete system model 4325.  After providing the model number, price, and availability, this customer was able to order the needed Cabinet Coolers which were shipped the same day.

Shipping solutions from stock is an everyday thing here at EXAIR.  If you’re in need of a solution for cooling, cleaning, conveying, removing static, or coating contact an EXAIR Application Engineer.  We can help you solve your problem – TODAY!

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

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