Spot Cooling

A new solution to an old problem. Heat build up on dry machining operations reduces tool life and machining rates. The Cold Gun Aircoolant System produces a stream of clean, cold air at 50°F (28°C) below supply air temperature. Operation is quiet and there are no moving parts to wear out. It will remove heat to prolong tool life and increase productivity on machining operations when liquid coolants cannot be used.

The Cold Gun is also an alternative to expensive mist systems. It eliminates the costs associated with the purchase and disposal of cutting fluids and worker related health problems from breathing airborne coolants or slipping on wet shop floors.

The standard Cold Gun and High Power Cold Gun incorporate a vortex tube to convert an ordinary supply of compressed air (1) into two low pressure streams, one hot and one cold. The Cold Gun’s hot airstream is muffled and discharged through the hot air exhaust (2). The cold air (3) is muffled and discharged through the flexible hose (4), which directs it to the point of use. Easy mounting and portability are provided through the use of an attached magnetic base (5).

Applications include tool sharpening, drill and cutter grinding, drilling, band saw cooling, plastic machining and setting adhesives. 

EXAIR offers two types, the Cold Gun and the High Power Cold Gun.  The High Power Cold Gun blows twice the amount of cold air as the Cold Gun which doubles the cooling capacity.  They come standard with either a Single Point or a Dual Point Hose Kit with a cone and flat nozzle.  All systems come with a magnetic base and a filter separator.  The magnetic base makes this device simple to attach to your machine and start using. 

Jordan Shouse
Application Engineer

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Compressed Air Quality Classes – ISO 8573-1

ISO 8573-1:2010 is the international standard for Air Quality Classes. It lays the ground rules for acceptable levels of pollutants, particulate, moisture, and oil in a compressed air source. 

Image Courtesy of  the Compressed Air Challenge

Though the standard has detailed standards for maximum particle size, maximum pressure dew point and maximum oil content for different industries and/or environments (see Slide show above) we can generalize a bit and express the levels of air quality like this:

Plant Air – general plant compressed air used for air tools, nozzles etc.
Instrument Air – found in laboratories, paint and powder coat booths, used for climate control.
Process Air – used in food and pharmaceutical applications, electronics applications.
Breathing Air – used for breathing respirators, breathing tanks and hospital air systems.

Achieving the different levels of air quality can be done with 3 basic types of filtration.
     1. Particulate – a filter element removes particles larger than the opening in the filter material. Typically done with particles greater than 1 micron.
     2. Coalescing – use different methods to capture the particles; 1) direct interception – works like a sieve, 2) Inertial impaction – collision with filter media fibers, 3) Diffusion – particles travel in a spiral motion and are captured in the filter media.
     3. Adsorption – the filter element holds the contaminants by molecular adhesion.

Filters
EXAIR FILTER SEPARATORS

The higher the class your air needs to be the more of these filtration methods you will use. Adsorption will remove more and finer particles than a simple particulate filter. And many applications will use a combination of these methods.

EXAIR products, all of which need a source of “clean, dry air” will operate very well utilizing a source of plant air and only a particulate filter. Your process, dictate if you need to supply additional filtration methods for better air quality. For example, an automotive plant using compressed air to blow parts off will not need the kind of filtration a food handling facility will need while blowing a food product off. If you are using a lubricated compressor or have lubricant in your compressed air lines from another source, you will want to use a coalescing oil removal filter.

EXAIR stocks 5 micron particulate filters which are properly sized for each individual product as an option for our customers if they choose. We also stock coalescing oil removal filters for customers who may need to remove oil from the air. Replacement filter elements are also available and should be replaced at least twice a year, depending on the quality of your air.

Oil Removal Filter
EXAIR Oil Removal Filter

Remember to ask about filtration if you have any concerns about your air quality. We can assist in sizing up the proper filters to get the air quality we recommend for proper operation and longevity of our products. 

If you would like to see how we might be able to improve your process or provide a solution for valuable savings, please contact one of our Application Engineers.

Jordan Shouse
Application Engineer
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Image Courtesy of  the Compressed Air Challenge

Nozzles for Cleaning Inside Hose, Tube, Pipe and More

Some applications such as blowing chips or debris out of a pipe or blind hole, it may not be possible to blow forward. The pipe may be too long, making it impossible to push the debris all the way down the pipe or the other end of the pipe may not be open. In either of these scenarios, the Back Blow Nozzle is the right tool for the job. An array of holes around the diameter of the Back Blow Nozzles provides a powerful 360° airflow pattern that will clear out any leftover coolant or chips from the machining process.

EXAIR has three different size Back Blow Nozzles; the 1004SS (M4 x .5), the 1006SS (1/4 NPT), and the 1008SS (1” NPT). The 1004SS is recommended for use on pipes as small as ¼” and up to 1”. The 1006SS can be used for a wide range of pipe sizes, from 7/8” up to 4”. The 1008SS nozzle offers the greatest overall force for stubborn or sticky materials stuck to the inside diameter of the pipe. This nozzle is suitable for use in pipes ranging from 2”-16”. As the Back Blow Nozzle will be blowing chips and debris back out of the pipe towards the operator, it is always recommended that a Chip Shield is used. The strong polycarbonate Chip Shield will keep them safe from flying debris and keep you in compliance with OSHA directive 1910.242(b).

Various Views of the Model 1006SS Back Blow Nozzle

All of EXAIR’s Back Blow Nozzles are available with extensions. For the 1004SS we have extensions from 6”-36”, and from 12”-72” for the 1006SS and 1008SS. The Back Blow Nozzle can also be installed on our VariBlast, Soft Grip, Heavy Duty, and Super Blast Safety Air Guns. With such a wide range of available sizes and configurations, we can tackle just about any internal pipe cleaning application. If you have a process in your facility that may benefit from the use of one of these nozzles, give us a call and get one on order today!

Jordan Shouse
Application Engineer

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EXAIR Webinar Oct. 15 at 1pm EDT- Compressed Air Safety and NIOSH Hierarchy of Controls

It’s that time of year, where I get to do a deep dive into a topic and present a webinar on how EXAIR can help your end of use compressed air!

You can see our past Webinars on our website, you just need to create an account. https://www.exair.com/index.php/productline/webinars

Some of the past webinars covered topics like, Understanding Static Electricity, Optimize Your Compressed Air System in 6 Simple Steps, Intelligent Solutions for Electrical Enclosure Cooling, Intelligent Compressed Air Solutions for OSHA Compliance. You can still watch these recorded webinars at the link above!

EXAIR.com – Webinars On-Deman

Our Next Webinar is about the Hierarchy of Controls, the hierarchy of controls is a strategy that originates from NIOSH. In this webinar we will explain the main elements of the HIERARCHY OF CONTROLS and illustrate how to reach the highest level of control with important compressed air safety standards.

Worksite hazards can be mitigated in a wide variety of ways, but how do workers or their employers determine which way is the most effective and safe for their circumstances? This is when the NIOSH hierarchy of controls strategy is implemented along with Elimination through substitution.

Photo courtesy of http://www.cdc.gov

The idea behind this hierarchy is that the control methods at the top of graphic are potentially more effective and protective than those at the bottom. Following this hierarchy normally leads to the implementation of inherently safer systems, where the risk of illness or injury has been substantially reduced.

You can register for Compressed Air Safety and NIOSH Hierarchy of Controls on Oct 15, 2020 1:00 PM EDT at:

https://exair.co/webinar-28-fall2020

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Jordan Shouse
Application Engineer

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Twitter: @EXAIR_JS