Air Nozzles, Air Jets and Swivels

EXAIR’s Engineered Air Nozzles and Air Jets provide a superior solution to minimize compressed air usage and reduce noise levels for compressed air blow-off operations.

Air Nozzles and Jets – when compared to commonly used open copper tubes or pipes the compressed air savings can be as high as 80%. With less compressed air, sound levels are greatly reduced.  A 10 dBA noise level reduction is typical.  All EXAIR Air Nozzles and Jets meet OSHA guidelines for dead end pressure and sound level exposure requirements.

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EXAIR has engineered air nozzles for virtually any application 

EXAIR Nozzles are designed and manufactured to take advantage of the Coanda (wall attachment of a high velocity fluid) effect which can amplify the airflow up to 25 times. The compressed air exits through the small holes on the nozzle which entrains the surrounding air. The effect from this is a high volume, high velocity blast using less compressed air.  EXAIR manufactures many sizes and styles of air nozzles from the smallest, but quite powerful Atto Super Air Nozzles to our largest 1-1/4 NPT Super Air Nozzle.  We also offer Flat Super Air Nozzles, and the Back Blow style nozzle for cleaning out tubes, pipes, channels or holes from 1/4″ to 16″ in diameter.

All of our Air Nozzles are engineered to meet or exceed OSHA Standard 1910.24(b) for 30 PSIG dead end pressure, they cannot be dead-ended as there is always a route for the air to escape so the outlet pressure will never reach 30 PSIG. In addition, our products are going to meet the OSHA Standard CFR 29 – 1910.95(a) for allowable noise exposure levels.
EXAIR Air Jets also utilize the Coanda effect to produce air motion in their surroundings.  A small amount of compressed air (1) is throttled through an internal ring nozzle above sonic velocity.  A vacuum is produced, pulling in large volumes of surrounding, or ‘free’ air, through an around the jet (2).  The exit flow is the combination of the two air sources (3).

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How an Air Jet Works

EXAIR manufactures Air Jets in two types, High Velocity, and Adjustable with materials of construction of brass and Type 303 Stainless Steel.  The High Velocity Air Jet uses a changeable shim to set the gap, controlling the force and flow of the air.  The Adjustable does not use a shim, and has a micrometer gap indicator and locking ring to allow for varying force and flow performance.

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EXAIR Air Jets – High Velocity type on the left, Adjustable type on the Right
Swivel Fittings available from M4 up to 1″ NPT

EXAIR’s Swivel Fittings make it easy to adjust the position of the Air Nozzles and Air Jets.  The fittings allow for movement of 25° form the center axis for a total movement of 50°.  There are nine different models available and all of them are made from stainless steel

If you would like to discuss blow off, noise levels, dead end pressure or any of EXAIR’s intelligent compressed air usage solutions, I would enjoy hearing from you…give me a call.

Steve Harrison
Application Engineer
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Video Blog: With EXAIR Products, Engineering Maximizes Efficiency

This video blog showcases just why engineering even the small details of a compressed air product can have a large impact on compressed air savings, safety, and efficiency.  This is why it is critical to know whether the company you are dealing with originally designed the product you purchased or if it is merely a copy.

 

 

Brian Farno
Application Engineer Manager
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com @EXAIR_BF

1″ Flat Super Air Nozzle Makes Clean Sweep Of Greasy Chain

A manufacturer of lubrication equipment had a messy problem to solve with a customized system they were designing, to apply grease to a drive chain.  They wanted to clean excess grease off the chain and deposit it into a reclaiming chamber, both to keep the area clean, and to prevent waste.  And because of the corrosive nature of the environment, it had to be stainless steel.  This was a “textbook” application for our Model 1126SS 1″ 316SS Flat Super Air Nozzle.

 

EXAIR’s 1″ Flat Super Air Nozzle is available in Zinc Aluminum or 316SS Construction. The replaceable shim makes it one of our most versatile products.

They also needed to lock it into position, once the exact angle of the air flow was determined, so they incorporated a Model 9052 1/8 NPT SS Swivel Fitting into their design.

When supplied with a Swivel Fitting, the 1″ Flat Super Air Nozzle can be precisely aimed for the most exacting applications.

Now the chain is clean, the grease is reclaimed, and the simplicity of the operation drew a lot of positive attention from the client.

I’ve written about this before, but it bears repeating…EXAIR Corporation’s plan for success is centered on being easy to do business with.  This was a situation where every facet of the project was impacted by our commitment to that goal:

*The customer and I determined the correct product to try in just a few minutes on the phone.

*The order shipped out, same day.

*The attention to detail that Engineering and Production put into the development of this product became evident in the ease of installation and operation.

From the moment you contact EXAIR, to the moment you achieve success in your application, it’s our job to make sure you get the most out of our products. If you have a job that you think one of our products might be a good fit for, give me a call.

What Is The Difference Between Pressure & Flow In A Compressed Air System?

There is rarely a day that goes by that I don’t receive a call from someone who has a need for a compressed air product and when I state the SCFM requirements of the device they respond back with the psi rating of their air compressor.  Many technicians simply do not understand the difference between the two.  Simply put psi (pounds square inch) is force and CFM (cubic feet per minute) is flow.

A simple illustration would be to contrast a 12 VDC powered air compressor that many people carry in their trunks to inflate car tires.  They will inflate your car tire to 35 psi in a matter of minutes.  While the air compressor at a tire shop can inflate a car tire in a minute or less.  What is the difference?

12 VDC Air Compressor
12 VDC Tire Inflator

 

Simply put, the flow. Both inflate the tire to the desired pressure but the one with largest flow (volume) does it much faster.  In the case of a compressed air product such as an air nozzle, the pressure required to operate is only one part of what is necessary to operate the device effectively, you need to have enough flow or CFM.

Let us now consider an EXAIR 1100 Super Air Nozzle, its rated performance of 13 ounces of force at 12″ distance from the nozzle is derived from supplying 14 SCFM @ 80 psi.  The typical home use air compressor that runs on 110 VAC (Generally 2 HP maximum) will not generate the flow (volume /CFM) at 80 psi to run the nozzle at peak force, just as it would not generate enough flow to fill the tire as quickly as the industrial compressor at a tire shop.

When an open tube, pipe or inefficient nozzle is placed at the end of an air line to provide blow off for cooling or cleaning it demands much greater volume from the compressor. If the compressor cannot keep up the force (pressure) of the system will decline. Replacing an open tube or pipe with an EXAIR engineered nozzle will require less compressed air volume which, in turn, will give the compressor more ability to provide full pressure and force upon your application.

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EXAIR 1100 Super Air Nozzle

If you would like to discuss air consumption of any of EXAIR’s engineered solutions, I would enjoy hearing from you…give me a call.

Steve Harrison
Application Engineer
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12 VDC Tire Inflator Image courtesy of Moto Service Dinamarca

 

EXAIR’s Swivel Fittings Provide Precise Blowoff Positioning

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EXAIR’s smaller Swivel Fittings for the Atto, Pico, and Nano Super Air Nozzles

Are you tired of having to scrounge around the production floor for the right fittings to precisely position your air nozzle? Not only is it a pain to try and find the correct fittings, extensions, etc. but once you do the position of the nozzle is hard to adjust. To alleviate this problem, EXAIR has designed a variety of different sized swivel fittings that allow you to precisely position the nozzle, then easily tighten and lock into place.

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Don’t waste time using various pipe fittings to position your nozzle, use an EXAIR Swivel Fitting

EXAIR’s Swivel Fittings are available in 9 different sizes, from as small as 1/8” NPT male x M4 x .5mm female and up to 1” NPT male x 1” NPT female. The smaller swivels (M4-M6) are constructed of 316 stainless steel and the swivels ranging from 1/8 NPT – 1” NPT are available in 303 stainless steel. The Swivel Fittings allow for movement of 25 degrees from the center axis for a total movement of 50 degrees. This permits correct placement of the blowing angle, helping to optimize the performance of your blowoff process. With no gaskets or seals to wear out, there’s no maintenance required to maintain optimum performance.

Swivel Fittings

Swivels can be used on any of our Air Nozzles up to 1” and can also be used with the Adjustable and Super Air Amplifiers. By simply adding a “W” suffix to the part number, the correctly sized swivel fitting will be added to your order. For example, an 1122W would be one of our 2” Flat Super Air Nozzles with a ¼ NPT male x ¼ NPT female Swivel Fitting included. Stop wasting time trying to find the proper fittings and positioning for your blowoff nozzles! Contact an Application Engineer and get some of EXAIR’s Swivel Fittings on order today, available from stock.

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

Replacing a 1/4″ Open Copper Tube With a 2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle Leads To Quick ROI

The generation of compressed air accounts for approximately 1/3 of all energy costs in an industrial facility and up to 30% of that compressed air is wasted through inefficient operation. Open pipes or homemade blowoffs waste a ton of compressed air, resulting in high operating costs. By replacing these devices with an energy efficient, engineered solution, you can reduce this waste and dramatically cut energy costs.

For example, let’s look at the average operating costs for a single 1/4″ open copper tube. (If you don’t know you current energy costs, a reasonable average to use is $ 0.25 per every 1,000 SCF used, based on $ 0.08/kWh.

1/4″ Copper tube

A single 1/4″ open copper tube consumes 33 SCFM @ 80 PSIG and costs roughly $ 0.50 per hour to operate. (33 SCF x 60 minutes x $ 0.25 / 1,000 = $ 0.50). For an 8 hour shift, the total cost would be $ 4.00 ($ 0.50 x 8 hours = $ 4.00).

If we were to replace the 1/4″ open copper tube with our Model # 1122 2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle with 1/4″ FNPT inlet, the air consumption would be reduced to 21.8 SCFM @ 80 PSIG. This may not seem like much of an air usage reduction, but when you look at the monetary, total cost of ownership for purchasing and operating the nozzle, the savings can quickly add up.

2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle

The operating cost for a 2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle with 1/4″ FNPT inlet is $ 0.33 per hour (21.8 SCF x 60 minutes x $ 0.25 / 1,000 = $ .033) or $ 2.64 per 8 hour shift ($ 0.33 x 8 hours = $ 2.64).

We can now compare the operational cost between the 2 devices:

1/4″ open copper tube operating costs:
$ 0.50 per hour
$ 4.00 per day (8 hours)

2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle operating costs:
$ 0.33 per hour
$ 2.64 per day (8 hours)

Cost Savings:
$ 4.00 / day (open copper tube) –  $ 2.64 / day (2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle) = $ 1.36 savings per day

The Model # 1122 2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle has a list price $ 67.00 USD.

ROI or Return On Investment calculation:
$ 67.00 (Cost) / $ 1.36 (savings per day) = 49.26 days.

The 2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle would pay for itself in just over 49 days in operation. This is the savings for replacing just ONE 1/4″ open copper tube with an engineered solution! In most industrial plants, there could be several of these which presents even more opportunities to reduce the overall operational costs.

Our focus here at EXAIR is to improve the overall efficiency of industrial compressed air operating processes and point of use compressed air operated products. If you are looking to reduce compressed air usage in your facility, contact an application engineer and let us help you optimize your current system.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

A Brief History of the Air Compressor

Essentially compressed air technology was first used with the knowledge of how to start a fire.  Humans learned that to get the fire started, blowing helped the process, healthy human lungs can generate approximately .02 to .08 bar or .3 to 1.2 PSI.

At the beginning of the metallurgical age (approximately 3000 B.C.) a higher volume of air than what human lungs could produce was required to the reach the temperatures required to melt and form metals such as copper, tin, lead, etc.  This need lead to the hand-operated bellows, the first mechanical air compressor.  Approximately 1500 years later the more efficient foot powered bellows was developed.

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The foot powered bellows was followed by water powered bellows and was the mainstay for more than 2000 years.  However as blast furnaces came into being the need for compressed air increased.  This lead John Smeaton in 1762 to design a water wheel that powered a blowing cylinder and this began to replace bellows.  In 1776 John Wilkinson developed an efficient blasting machine and this was the beginning for mechanically powered air compressors.

As time progressed the idea of transmitting energy via compressed air became acceptable.  This idea was demonstrated around 1800 when the newly invented pneumatic rock drill was used to tunnel 80 miles under Mt. Cenis to connect Italy & France by rail.  This was an extraordinary feat for the time and garnered global interest.  This event perpetuated great interest into pneumatic powered devices  and brought us the air powered motors, clocks and even beer dispensers!

While compressed air is capable of transmitting energy long distances and performing tremendous work it also referred to as the 4th utility in industrial plants due to its cost.  We at EXAIR have been promoting compressed air conservation and safety using highly engineered products for 35 years!  Our products wring the maximum of energy out of every SCFM fed to them by using air entrainment and the Coanda effect.  Not only are we conserving your compressed air we offer products that are quiet and can’t be dead ended which prevents air embolisms.

If you are interested in discussing conserving compressed air and/or compressed air safety, I would enjoy hearing from you.

Steve Harrison
Application Engineer

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