EXAIR’s Flat Nozzles: Safe, Reliable, and Efficient

Here on the EXAIR Blog we frequently discuss dead-end pressure as explained in OSHA Standard 1910.242(b). This directive states that the when compressed air is used for cleaning purposes, the dead-ended pressure must not exceed 30 psig. When pressures greater than this occur, there is potential for an air embolism. This animation shows and explains how an air embolism can affect the body.

EXAIR’s Flat Nozzles adhere to this OSHA directive. The Flat Nozzles consist of three primary components: the body, the cap, and the shim. The thickness of the shim will dictate the flow and force through the nozzle and can be easily adjusted. The cap slightly protrudes from the body and shim, creating a gap when it is pressed up onto the skin. By ensuring that there is always an avenue for that air to escape, there is no potential for it to be dead-ended.

2fsanfam2
From top to bottom: Model 1126, 1126SS, 1122, and 1122SS

EXAIR’s flat nozzles are available in two sizes: 1” and 2”. Each size has a shim set that can be purchased for adjusting both the flow and force from the nozzle. These nozzles are available in both zinc/aluminum alloy as well as 316 grade Stainless Steel. They can be used by themselves, installed on our Safety Air Guns, or in conjunction with our Stay Set Hoses that allow for easy re-positioning.

You may have seen (or used) the plastic flat nozzles that come in a variety of different colors. EXAIR’s flat nozzle is a safe, efficient, and more robust replacement that will maintain a similar airflow pattern at a dramatically reduced operating cost. Where plastic nozzles may become damaged or break off, the rigid construction of EXAIR’s Flat Nozzle will not. In addition to be safe, durable, and reliable, EXAIR’s flat nozzles also offer a reduced sound level compared to these styles of nozzle. Reducing sound is another directive that OSHA 29 CFR 1910.95 covers. If you’re using an unsafe nozzle in your facility, OSHA can quickly begin assessing fines for each violation. They don’t announce their visits beforehand, so make sure you do your due diligence and assess your compressed air blowoff products yourself!

2san_blowaway
EXAIR 2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle “blows” away the competition!

If you would like to discuss how to make your compressed air use safer and more efficient, give us a call. Our team of highly-trained Application Engineers is standing by, ready to help you make the switch to an Intelligent Compressed Air Product.

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer

E-mail:TylerDaniel@exair.com
Twitter:@EXAIR_TD

EXAIR Cabinet Coolers – Built to Last!!!

I recently had the pleasure of working with a customer in UAE that manufactures tobacco products. They were duplicating an existing line due to an increase in demand and needed another Cabinet Cooler. The previous unit, HT4325-24VDC, had been installed approximately 20 years ago and was still functioning without any issues. This was long before he had started working with the company and they were unable to locate any order history with EXAIR to determine the appropriate model size to order.

cabinet cooler
HT4325 Cabinet Cooler – 20 years old!!!

They installed the cooler and auto-drain filter that comes with the kit. The only maintenance they’ve had to complete for the system is periodically changing the filter element. The Cabinet Cooler has no moving parts to wear out and requires little to no maintenance so long as it is supplied with clean, dry compressed air.

EXAIR’s UL Listed, CE Compliant Cabinet Coolers are available with Nema 12 (IP54) or Nema 4/4X (IP66) ratings. They’re capable of delivering 275 Btu/hr – 5,600 Btu/hr of cooling capacity and can be thermostatically controlled to reduce compressed air consumption. The rugged nature of EXAIR’s Cabinet Coolers makes them an ideal solution for dirty industrial environments. No longer will you experience shutdowns or downtime due to an overheated cabinet, maintenance required for A/C units, or contamination inside of your enclosure. By purging the cabinet with cool, clean air the EXAIR Cabinet Cooler keeps your cabinet cool while also preventing any dirt, dust, or debris from the ambient environment from wreaking havoc on your sensitive electronics.

The thermostatically controlled systems are pre-set to 95°F, but can easily be adjusted. Check out the video below for a brief instruction of how to adjust the thermostat if you require a different temperature inside the cabinet.

 

 

If you have control panels that are shutting down to excess heat, give us a call. With our Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide, we’ll just need a few quick measurements and we can easily size the appropriate system for your needs.

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

Intelligent Compressed Air: Things to Consider when Designing the Compressor Room

37719673802_6f5c603fa6_o

One common thing that can be easily overlooked is the importance of designing an efficient compressor room. After you’ve determined your overall requirements and selected the appropriate compressor, you can begin designing the layout of your compressor room. For starters, the compressor room should be located in a central location when possible, close to the point of use. This will help to minimize pressure drop as well as reduce installation costs as less piping will be required. If this isn’t possible, try to keep the compressor room close to the larger volume applications in your facility. Otherwise you will have to use larger diameter piping in order to ensure an adequate volume of air is available.

The diameter of the distribution piping should NOT be based on the connection size of the compressors, aftercoolers, or filters. According to the Compressed Air Challenge Best Practices for Compressed Air Systems handbook, piping should be sized so that the maximum velocity in the pipe is 30 ft/sec. When the distance between the compressor room and the point of use is lengthy, consider increasing the pipe diameter to minimize the pressure drop across the system.

Inside of your compressor room you’ll have a variety of different equipment, all dependent on the demand, quality, supply, storage, and distribution of your compressed air. Keeping all of the equipment in its own room will also provide some insulation from the noise associated with compressed air generation. It is crucial that the space selected as your compressor room is sufficiently large enough to accommodate everything without becoming cramped. As a general rule of thumb, keep about 3′ of space between equipment such as the compressor, receiver tanks, aftercooler, and dryer. This helps to prevent equipment from overheating as well as offers maintenance personnel adequate space with which to perform any regularly scheduled maintenance or repairs.

Once you’ve selected your equipment, piping, and determined the location, another thing to consider is ventilation. As compressed air is generated, the compressor gives off a good amount of heat. It is important that the exhaust air is not permitted to re-circulate throughout the compressor room. The exhaust needs to be ducted so that it the warm air is not drawn in at the air intake on the compressor. Some equipment, such as refrigerated dryers, requires a substantial amount of cooling air. In these situations, an exhaust fan can be used to provide that additional airflow.

To further enhance the efficiency of your facility, the heat generated from compression can be re-purposed instead of simply exhausting into the ambient environment. This process is commonly referred to as compressed air energy recovery. Some industries require a source of heat for many of their manufacturing processes. In these scenarios, the heat energy that is produced during compression can be reused rather than having to generate another source of heated air. If the heated air can’t be used for any of your manufacturing processes, the heat can be used as a means to heat your water supply or even to heat the facility itself. This can drastically reduce your electricity or gas requirements during cooler periods.

To reduce the amount of required maintenance and ensure that your compressor is operating as efficiently as possible, the compressed air intake must also be free from particulate and harmful gases. When dust and dirt is drawn into the compressor, it can cause wear on the internal components. If the ambient environment contains a lot of dust and particulate, a pre-filter can be used to prevent any future problems. In these instances, it is important to consider the pressure drop that will be caused when designing the system.

Keeping these tips in mind will serve to make your life much easier in the long run. Once you have everything installed and set up, visit the EXAIR website or give us a call to speak with an Application Engineer. EXAIR’s Intelligent Compressed Air Products  can help you reduce compressed air consumption and increase worker safety by adhering to both OSHA 1910.242(b) and 1910.95.

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

Image Courtesy of  thomasjackson1345 Creative Commons.

Video Blog: EXAIR’s New Wireless Digital Flowmeter Installation

9093ZG-DG
Model 9093ZG

This year EXAIR has introduced the new Wireless Digital Flowmeter. This meter is capable of monitoring compressed air consumption and transmitting the usage data to your PC wirelessly using ZigBee mesh networking protocol.

Each meter has a range of 100′ and allows for multiple meters to be installed on the same network, “piggybacking” off of one another. As long as the next meter is installed within 100′ of the first, you will only require one ZigBee gateway.

Take a look at my short video below that will walk you through the steps of installing the EXAIR Logger Software and the Device Discovery Software found on the website. Then, start logging your data!

 

Tyler Daniel

Application Engineer

E-mail: TylerDaniel@exair.com

Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

 

EXAIR Super Air Knives Offer Infinitely Adjustable Force and Flow!

LSAK72in_fishslimepr_800pxsq

EXAIR’s industry leading Super Air Knife dramatically reduces compressed air usage and noise when compared to other blowoff methods. The Super Air Knife is available in lengths ranging from 3”-108” and in Aluminum, 303 Stainless Steel, 316 Stainless Steel, and PVDF for corrosive applications. Even at high pressures of 80 psig, the Super Air Knife is able to maintain a sound level of just 69 dBA for most applications! Air is entrained from the ambient environment at a rate of 40:1, maximizing the force and flow from the Super Air Knife. In addition, these knives meet or exceed OSHA maximum dead-end pressure and noise requirements.

completeAirknifesets
From left to right – plastic shims, SS shims, PTFE shims included in the shim sets

Adjustability of both the force and flow from the Super Air Knife is infinitely adjustable. Right out of the box from the factory the Super Air Knife comes stock with a .002” thick shim installed. This sets the gap between the body and cap of the knife and determines how much compressed air can flow through the precise, slotted orifice. An accessory that EXAIR has available for the Super Air Knife is the shim set. For the aluminum knives, a .001”, .003”, and .004” plastic shims come in the shim set. To reduce the flow and force, a .001” can be used. If more force is required, a thicker shim can be installed. For the stainless steel and PVDF knives, (3) .002” shims are included in the set. Stainless steel shims for the stainless knives and a PTFE shim for the PVDF. These, as well as the plastic shims, can be stacked on top of one another to create an even larger gap. One thing that is important to keep in mind however, the larger the air gap the greater the air consumption. Installing a .004” shim in a Super Air Knife will double the flow and consumption of the knife when compared to the stock .002” shim.

Installing a new shim in your Super Air Knife is very simple to do. Check out this quick video from Neal Raker that walks you through the steps:

While the different shims are available for you to make gross adjustments to the force and flow of your Super Air Knife, there is one additional method. By using a pressure regulator, you can fine-tune the input pressure that is supplied to the Super Air Knife. This will also greatly impact the force and flow. At 40 psig, the Super Air Knife will consume 1.7 scfm/inch and provide 1.1 oz/inch of force. At 80 psig, it will consume 2.9 scfm/inch and provide 2.5 oz/inch of force. EXAIR offers pressure regulators in a variety of different sizes to accommodate any of our Super Air Knives from 3” all the way up to 108”.

If you’re wasting air in your facility using cheap nozzles, drilled pipes, or any other inefficient solution give us a call. An Application Engineer will gladly investigate your application and help to design a better, safer, and more cost-effective solution!

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

Cold, Dry Climates are a Recipe for Static Problems

A few weeks ago, for the first time this season, I had to scrape ice off of my windshield before heading to work. Living in the Midwest, this is the first sign that winter is coming. The colder climate doesn’t just alter my typical morning rituals but it also brings with it much drier air. This dry air can create static problems in your facility that will wreak havoc on your processes and sometimes the operators.

PET bottle
Empty PET dishwashing liquid bottle

I recently had the pleasure of working with a customer in Vietnam that was having some issues with static electricity in a labeling process. The company makes dishwashing liquid and before bottling they must label the PET bottles. They were not able to get the labels to properly adhere to the bottle. This forced them to periodically stop the line and have two operators manually rub the surface of the label to get it to stick properly. They knew there had to be a better way. After spending some time searching the internet for solutions, they stumbled upon the EXAIR website and reached out to us for help.

IMG20171107152410
Operators fixing the labels on the PET bottles

The solution was to install (2) 112012 12” Gen4 Super Ion Air Knives, one on either side of the bottles. They were installed at about a 45° angle with the airflow pattern against the direction of travel of the bottles. This counter-flow as we call it, maximizes the time in contact that the bottles have with the static eliminating ionized airflow. Mounting them in this manner gives the best possible chance of success in any static eliminating, cleaning, drying, or blowoff application. The airflow is able to reach the bottles much earlier up the line than if it were to be simply blowing perpendicular to the bottles.

Unfortunately in this case the customer was unable to quantify their production gains. But they were able to remove the additional process of manually fixing the labels and could operate continuously without interruption. By eliminating the tedious step of inspecting bottles and fixing the labels, worker morale and job satisfaction was significantly improved.

GEN4-siakpconveyor_800xsq
A 6″ Gen4 Super Ion Air Knife removing static from labels

If the cold, dry winter climate has you worried about static issues in your facility, give us a call. An Application Engineer will be happy to determine a solution from our wide range of Gen4 Static Eliminators.

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

Intelligent Compressed Air: What is an Air Compressor?

37719673802_6f5c603fa6_o
Example of the supply side of a compressed air system

One thing that is found in virtually every industrial environment is an air compressor. Some uses for the compressed air generated are: powering pneumatic tools, packaging, automation equipment, conveyors, controls systems, and various others. Pneumatic tools are favored because they tend to be smaller and more lightweight than electric tools, offer infinitely variable speed and torque, and can be safer than the hazards associated with electrical devices. In order to power these devices, compressed air must be generated.

types of compressors

There are two main categories of air compressors: positive-displacement and dynamic. In a positive-displacement type, a given quantity of air is trapped in a compression chamber. The volume of which it occupies is mechanically reduced (squished), causing a corresponding rise in pressure. In a dynamic compressor, velocity energy is imparted to continuously flowing air by a means of impellers rotating at a very high speed. The velocity energy is then converted into pressure energy.

Of the positive-displacement variety they are broken down further into two more categories: reciprocating and rotary. A reciprocating compressor works like a bicycle pump. A piston reduces the volume occupied by the air or gas, compressing it into a higher pressure. There are two types of reciprocating compressors, single or double-acting. Single-acting compressors are the most common and are available up to 30HP at 200 psig. Their small size and weight allow them to be installed near the point of use and avoid lengthy piping runs. These are the types of compressors that would be commonly found in your garage. The double-acting reciprocating compressor is much like its single-acting brethren, only it uses both sides of the piston and cylinder for air compression. This doubles the capacity of the compressor for a given cylinder size. They are much more efficient than single-acting compressors, but are more expensive and do require a more specialized installation and maintenance.

Rotary compressors are available in lubricant-injected or lubicrant-free varieties. These types of compressors use two inter-meshing rotors that have an inlet port at one end and a discharge port at the other. Air flows through the inlet port and is trapped between the lobes and the stator. As the rotation continues, the point intermeshing begins to move along the length of the rotors. This reduces the space that is occupied by the air, resulting in an increase in pressure. In the lubricant-injected compressors, the compression chamber is lubricated between the intermeshing rotors and bearings. This takes away the heat of compression and also acts as a seal. In the lubricant-free varieties, the intermeshing rotors have very tight tolerances and are not allowed to touch. Since there is no fluid to remove the heat of compression, they typically have two stages of compression with an intercooler between and an after cooler after the second stage. Lubricant-free compressors are beneficial as they supply clean, oil-free compressed air. They are, however, more expensive and less efficient to operate than the lubricant-injected variety.

On the other side of the coin, we have the dynamic compressors. These are comprised of two main categories: axial and centrifugal. These types of compressors raise the pressure of air or gas by imparting velocity energy and converting it to pressure energy. In a centrifugal air compressor, air continuously flows and is accelerated by an impeller. This impeller can rotate at speeds that exceed 50,000 rpm. Centrifugal air compressors are generally much larger and can accommodate flow ranges of 500-100,000 CFM. They also provide lubricant-free air.

Axial compressors are used for situations that require lower pressure but high flow rates. They do not change the direction of the gas, it enters and exits the compressor in an axial direction. It is accelerated and then diffused which creates the increase in pressure. A common application that would be served by this type of compressor is to compress the air intake of gas turbines. They have a relatively high peak efficiency, however their large overall size and weight as well as the high starting power requirements pose some disadvantages.

Just as you can find a wide variety of makes and models of automobiles, the same can be said for air compressors. The size, type, and features will be dictated by the types of applications that you’ll be needing the compressed air for in your facility. A quick chat with your local air compressor supplier will help you to determine which type is most suitable for you.

Of course, any of these types of compressors can be used to supply air to your engineered Intelligent Compressed Air Products. If you have an application in your facility that could benefit from an engineered solution, give us a call. An Application Engineer would be happy to discuss your options with you and see to it that you’re getting the most out of your compressed air!

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

 

Images Courtesy of  the Compressed Air Challenge and thomasjackson1345 Creative Commons.