Cabinet Cooler® System Calculator – EXAIR’s Latest Do-It-Yourself Tool!

At EXAIR we are constantly moving, changing, growing, and building products and tools to help anyone that comes into contact with us or our products. Evidence of this includes our continued launches of new product and tools that you can see in our Press Releases. Our newest tool provides a do-it-yourself solution to determine which Cabinet Cooler System model number your electrical or control panel will need. This easiest way to reach this new tool is to follow our websites Resource’s button to the Calculator Library. We have made the selection process easier and faster with this new calculator.

Historically, the Cabinet Cooler sizing guide was the fastest way to receive a recommendation – But now, the calculator provides a do-it-yourself solution with instant feedback!

While we have always offered the ability to fill out a Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide (above) and email, call, chat or fax the information to us. With the right amount of information provided, an e-mail will provide you an answer within 24 hours. With a phone call or online chat, we can get you an answer in 5-10 minutes. But now you can receive instant feedback as to which Cabinet Cooler System is needed to combat an overheating cabinet by using the Cabinet Cooler Calculator. We have poured our knowledge and experience from over the years into the tool to best fit to our standards of correctly calculating and compensating for diverse environments and demands of electrical panels.

With some basic information on the panel, environment, and compressed air available, the calculator will calculate the internal heat load, external heat load, compensate for non-optimal compressed air temperature or pressure, and solar heat load(where applicable) then show the exact model number needed to reach the desired temperature for the panel. You can then immediately learn more about that specific model or order that model online. Of course you can also reach out to anyone here at EXAIR and receive answers to additional questions and or place the order with an actual person.

If you want to discuss your overheating panels or if you have some questions on why we are asking for certain variables on the Cabinet Cooler Calculator, feel free to contact us.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Spring is Coming. Time to Make Sure Your Control Panels are Ready!

In Ohio, there’s a long-running joke that we actually have 12 total seasons throughout the year. It’s not uncommon to enjoy a day in early-March with sunshine and highs in the low 70s. It’s also not uncommon to have temperatures dip into the single digits along with a late bout of snow. That point at which we begin to experience warm temperatures is known around these parts as “Spring of Deception” or “False Spring”. This is followed abruptly by “Third Winter”. Needless to say we’re all sick of the rain, snow, cold, and ready to get outside and enjoy some warm weather!

With spring upon us, that means summer is right around the corner. While this is an exciting event for most of us, your maintenance manager may beg to differ. Increased temperatures lead to heat related problems in your electrical panels. With summer coming along before you know it, the time is now to get a solution in place before it becomes an issue.

EXAIR’s Cabinet Cooler Systems were designed specifically to rectify these issues within your facility. Utilizing Vortex Tube technology, the Cabinet Cooler produces cold air from an ordinary supply of compressed air. This cold air keeps the enclosure free of debris and moisture and is easily installed in minutes through a standard electrical knockout. Here is a short video that shows just how simple it really is. The Cabinet Cooler Systems are available with Nema 12 (IP54) ratings and are also available in Aluminum, 303 Stainless Steel, and 316 Stainless Steel construction for Nema 4/4X (IP66) rated enclosures. For systems that are not able to be mounted on top of the cabinet, we also have Side Mount Kits available in Aluminum, 303 Stainless, and 316 Stainless. This year, EXAIR also introduced a new line of Hazardous Location Cabinet Coolers for use in classified areas.

Inside, outdoors, high temperature, dirt/dust/humidity, corrosive and classified environments are no problem for EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Systems

These systems are available with cooling capacities of anywhere from 275-5,600 Btu/hr. To make things much easier for you, we offer a Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide that will allow us to recommend the most suitable model for your cabinet. With a few quick measurements, we’ll be able to determine the exact heat load that we’ll need to dissipate and offer you a quick and easy solution. If you experienced heat related issues on electrical panels last year, contact an Application Engineer today and we’ll see to it that this summer your cabinets remain cool!

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@EXAIR.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

Radiant Heat- Where Does It Come From

Even in extremely aggressive environments, EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Systems provide reliable heat protection for your sensitive electronics and controls.

The three types of heat transfer have been discussed here and there on this blog before. One of the most common heat transfer methods that I deal with on a day to day basis is radiant heat transfer. Also known as thermal radiation, the process is actually the exchange of energy by photons. The main difference separating radiant heat from convection and conduction is that radiation does not require there to be a medium to permit propagation of the heat. Any item which contains thermal energy, meaning it is above absolute zero and less than 1,000 Kelvin, will have this thermal energy. This thermal energy is radiated to other items causing a transfer of heat energy to those objects that results in an equilibrium between the items. The equilibrium does not stop the transfer of photons however.

The most common occurrence that most of us get to experience for radiant heat is heat from the Sun. As the sun shines it is emitting heat. On a hot day, generally the sun is a little closer to your geographic location and you feel hot because the sun is emitting more heat onto your surface than what is being emitted by your internal temperature, so your core temp will increase. On a cold day, when the sun is further away, while it is still shining you feel cold because the sun is not in fact transferring as much energy to the surface of your body than what you are internally generating. The same kind of radiant heat transfer can be from a campfire, open kiln, maybe even a hot steel slab coming out of a blast furnace.

The model 1126SSW 1″ Flat Stainless Steel Super Air Nozzle w/ Swivel Fitting cools a flame sensor within an industrial furnace.

Understanding where a radiant heat source is being generated can help tremendously when looking at cooling an electrical enclosure or even trying to keep a part or sensor cool. Radiant heat is one of the few times a heat shield or shade structure can help to eliminate a portion of the heat load being introduced. Other methods to combat the heat load would be determined with the application at hand. For cooling enclosures that are absorbing a solar heat load, we would look at an EXAIR Cabinet Cooler System and the factors that help to appropriately size the cooler. If this is a single component or part, we would evaluate one of the many other EXAIR Engineered Solutions to determine the best fit for the application. To do either of these, all it takes is a simple chat, email, or call to an Application Engineer.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

The Negative Effect of Hot Ambient Conditions on Traditional A/C Refrigerant Panel Coolers vs EXAIR Cabinet Coolers

EXAIR’s High Temp Cabinet Cooler Systems

As summer endures and temperatures continue to rise panel conditioning units can start to struggle to keep your electronics cool.  An agricultural company contacted EXAIR as they were having some issues with their air conditioning panel cooler.  The increase in outside temperatures caused the air conditioning systems to underperform.  The electronics were overheating and shutting down production.  They needed a better way to keep the internal circuits cool during the hotter months of summer. 

They sent in the information on the A/C panel that they were using (reference photo below).  I circled the important factors that we would need.  EXAIR is familiar with these tags as we helped many customers to find a more reliable way to keep their electronics cool.  This customer stated that they had already replaced three units in the past 10 years.  The one above has been in operation for only 3 months, and they were still worried about failure.  It could be due to lack of maintenance, dirty environment, or high ambient temperatures, but the short life of the refrigeration units was a major concern. 

From the placard, the total cooling capacity was DIN EN 14511 L35 L35 0.38KW as circled above.   The DIN EN 14511 is a European Standard that rates the performance of air conditioning units.  The first L35 is the temperature rating for inside the panel, 35oC.  The second L35 is the ambient temperature, 35oC.  The cooling capacity at those temperature conditions is 0.38KW, or 1,296 BTU/hr.  As you can see, the performance was measured with the ambient temperature at 35oC (95oF).  If the ambient temperature goes above this standard rating, the cooling capacity of the air conditioning unit will start to decrease.  With the EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Systems, we use the internal temperature as 35oC (95oF) as well, but our external temperature can be as high as 93oC (200oF).  Here is a diagram showing the range of the different types of cooling devices as compared to the ambient temperatures and the environment.

Another note on the placard is the IP Code – IP54; and “Maintains the environmental integrity of type 12”.  EXAIR offers three different NEMA ratings to keep the integrity of your panel.  We offer NEMA 12, NEMA 4 and NEMA 4X.  The rated voltage for the A/C panel cooler is 115 V / 60 Hz / 1-.  EXAIR offers three different voltages with our solenoid valves to work in conjunction with our thermostats.  We have 240Vac, 115Vac, and 24Vdc.  So, from the information supplied by the A/C panel cooler, we are getting close for a recommendation.  What do we need next?  The ambient temperature condition which affected the A/C panel cooler.  I need this information to calculate the heat load on the hottest day of the hottest month. 

In the Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide that we sent to them; they marked the “Maximum external temperature possible” at 130oF (54.4oC).  As seen in the chart below, this is the upper limit for the performance conditions for an A/C unit.  With the EXAIR Cabinet Cooler System, we can offer a High Temperature Cabinet Cooler that can work up to 200oF (93oC).  And, they will still operate under the harshest of environments.  With the size of their panel, the external heat load was calculated at 980 BTU/hr.  Remember, since we are replacing the A/C panel cooler with an EXAIR Cabinet Cooler System, we will need to add the 0.38KW or 1,296 BTU/hr to the external heat load.  The total heat load is measured at 980 BTU/hr + 1,296 BTU/hr = 2,276 BTU/hr

Since we now have all the information, I recommended a model HT4340 Cabinet Cooler System.  This system has a NEMA 12 Cabinet Cooler, a filter, a cold air distribution kit, a thermostat, and a 115Vac solenoid valve.  The cooling capacity for the HT4340 is 2.800 BTU/hr; above the required 2,276 BTU/hr maximum heat load.  So, when the internal temperature reaches 95oF (35oC), the thermostat will turn the solenoid off to save compressed air.  This Cabinet Cooler System fit the criteria as noted on the placard on the A/C unit for replacement. 

HT4340 Cabinet Cooler System

With they received the model HT4340, they were amazed at how small and compact the unit was.  The Cabinet Cooler does not have any moving parts, Freon, or condensers to clean.  They only need clean compressed air.  The installation was also very simple.  It took them longer to remove the A/C unit than to install the EXAIR Cabinet Cooler.  They were able to start using the Cabinet Cooler in less than one hour.  They also commented to me about how they wished that they knew about the Cabinet Cooler Systems 10 years ago.  The breakdowns, the replacements, the maintenance, and the headaches that the A/C units delivered cost them much money in material and production shutdowns. 

If you have electrical panels over-heating or air conditioning units under-performing, you should try an EXAIR Cabinet Cooler System.  You can fill out the Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide and an Application Engineer will find the best model to keep your operations running; even during the summer months. 

John Ball
Application Engineer
Email: johnball@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_jb