Keeping Sensitive Equipment Cool with an EXAIR Cabinet Cooler

The image above shows a sophisticated microscope used in a highly controlled environment to monitor living cells.  The end user of this microscope recently contacted the Application Engineering department at EXAIR in search of a method to cool the internal temperature of the microscope chamber from 22°C (72°F) to 14°C (57°F).

The small space of this application made the use of a typical refrigerant based air conditioner an impossibility.  But, near to this microscope is a source of very dry, clean, oil free compressed air – perfect for operating a Cabinet Cooler.

The internal heat load of this application was known by the end user, but the effects of external heat load on the application were still unclear.  In order to determine the full heat load of the application a Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide must be used to perform heat load calculations.  This document, once complete, allows EXAIR to determine both internal and external heat loads, which in turn allows us to determine the required Cabinet Cooler model number.

This application was served by the model 4325 Cabinet Cooler, which allowed for a cooling solution in tight spacing where a traditional air conditioning unit wouldn’t work.  The small and compact design of the Cabinet Cooler was the perfect fit for this customer and application need.  If you have an application in need of a cooling solution, contact an EXAIR Application Engineer.  We’ll be happy to help.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

Mini Cooler Improves Custom Cutlery Production

Vortex Tubes use compressed air to create a stream of cold air and a stream of hot air. As the compressed air enters the unit, it travels through a spin chamber which spins the air at speeds up to 1,000,000 RPM producing temperatures ranging from -50°F to +260°F and providing cooling up to 10,200 Btu/hr. With no maintenance requited and no moving parts, they have become quite popular in large and small scale cooling applications in place of more conventional methods of cooling.

How an EXAIR Vortex Tube Works

EXAIR has incorporated this technology into several different products like our Cabinet Cooler Systems used to cool electrical panels and our Cold Guns commonly used to replace messy mist systems in tool cooling, milling and machining operations. For smaller scale processes we offer our Mini Cooler System which provides a 50°F temperature drop from the compressed air supply temperature and 550 Btu/hr. of cooling capacity.

I recently worked with a small, custom knife manufacturer who was looking for a way to keep his tooling cool during production. As the blades are made, he uses a small rotary die tool to shape and sharpen the blade. He also makes his own handles out of materials like wood, ceramics or other metals, which get etched with a custom design into the surface. The heat generated during theses processes, causes the tooling to either bend or break completely, resulting in damage to the knife blade and burns or breaks in the wood and ceramic handles. After looking at our spot cooling products online, he familiarized himself with the Vortex Tube technology but with only 12.9 SCFM of air available, he was unsure what product would best fit his application.

With the limited amount of air available, the Model # 3808 Mini Cooler System was the perfect solution. The Mini Cooler uses only 8 SCFM @ 100 PSIG, falling well within the capacity of his current compressor. The integral magnetic base would ensure an easy installation and with the included flexible hose, he could direct the cold air to the needed area.

The Mini Cooler is ideal for small tool and part cooling applications.

For help with your spot cooling needs or to discuss how the Vortex Tube technology could help in your process, contact an application engineer for assistance.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

 

 

When things get heated, a Cabinet Cooler can cool things down.

Heated Desiccant Dryer

Many of us have walked into a compressor room.  They are typically a small room that is very warm as it contains an air compressor, a dryer, and other items that create heat.   To help remove the heat, a fan is placed near the ceiling to remove as much heat as possible.  But, when the days get warmer, it makes it more difficult to keep things cool inside the compressor room.  Recently I was working with a pharmaceutical company about the issues with the operation of his dryer.

For this customer, he was using a heated-type regenerative dryer in their facility to get a -40 deg. F dew point.  It was important in their process to have very dry compressed air because it was coming in contact with powders.  As the outside temperatures began to warm up, they started to see alarms and failures with their dryer system.  With a dryer shutdown, they had a potential of water going downstream into their process.  They contacted EXAIR for a solution.

He explained the situation in a bit more detail about his desiccant type dryer.  It had two towers next to each other.  One tower would dry the compressed air while the other tower would be heated to remove any water that was adsorbed by the desiccant.  The control panel was mounted in between the desiccant towers, and it operated the switching valves and heating cycle of the dryer.  When a tower was being regenerated by heat, the ambient temperature around the control panel was getting near 140 deg. F.  With this added heat, the electronics inside would malfunction and shut down the function of the dryer.  They did have a control fan near the ceiling to try and remove the heat from the room, but it was not very effective.  They needed an alternative way to keep the dryer running.  With the location of the control panel between the two towers, there was very little room to work.  He needed something very compact, easy to mount, and effective in maintaining a cool internal temperature.

EXAIR High Temp Cabinet Coolers

In calculating the high ambient heat and the size of the control panel, I recommended the HT4315 High Temperature Cabinet Cooler System.  It is able to handle the high ambient conditions from 125 – 200 deg. F.  With a dimension of 1.34” diameter and a length of 8”, this compact design had no problem fitting onto the panel between the towers.  Even with this small design, the model HT4315 had plenty of cooling capacity to keep the electronics inside from overheating, eliminating the concern with their dryer system shutting down.

To mount this Cabinet Cooler System, a 1 1/8” knock-out hole in the cabinet and a small wire connection hole for the thermostat are the main steps.  This makes it fast and easy to install onto the panel to start getting the cold air to  the electronics.  With a thermostat control, it will only operate the Cabinet Cooler during high temperature conditions, making the system very effective.  The design of the Cabinet Coolers has no moving parts, no motors, no Freon or condensers to clean.  Once they are installed, they are maintenance and worry-free.

If you wish not to have failures in your compressor room during the hot months, a Cabinet Cooler System can be the correct product for you.  If you need help in sizing, you can fill out the EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Sizing form and send it in to us.  For my customer mentioned above, the integrity of their compressed air system was sustained to keep their production process running smoothly.

 

John Ball
Application Engineer

Email: johnball@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_jb

 

Heated Desiccant Dryer by Compressor1.  Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic.

Increased Temps = Time For A Cabinet Cooler

This past Monday, we kicked off the start to the new Spring season, which means warmer temperatures are in the forecast. Here in Cincinnati, we are expecting temps in the low 40’s up to the high 60’s. We’ve written a couple blogs in the past few weeks about the changes in temps and weather and the proverbial “spring cleaning” and the use of our Vacuum Systems for industrial cleanup.

Another area of concern relating to the increased temps is the overheating and contamination of electrical control panels in industrial environments. As the temperatures go up, many companies are looking for a fast solution and will open the doors on the panel and use a fan to blow air across the sensitive controls. While this method does provide some cooling and seems like a quick fix, you are also introducing dirty, potentially humid air into the enclosure which can result in failures and lost production.  Not to mention, this is an OSHA violation which can lead to potential injury to operators  and/or costly fines.

What seems like a simple fix is actually a BAD idea!

EXAIR’s Cabinet Coolers are a reliable, maintenance free way to keep electrical enclosures cool, dry and clean. The Cabinet Coolers are compressed air operated, with cooling capacities ranging from 275 Btu/hr. up to our largest Dual System of 5,600 Btu/hr. The units discharge the cold air into the cabinet at a slight positive pressure which expels the hot, dirty air, leaving only the cool, clean, dry air from the system. Systems are available for continuous operation, maintaining a 45% relative humidity on a completely sealed cabinet, ensuring no condensation develops inside the cabinet. Our Thermostat Controlled Systems are available in 120VAC, 240VAC or 24VDC, providing a more economical operation by only using compressed air when needed to reach the desired temperature set point. Our thermostats are preset at the factory to 95°F but are adjustable to meet your specific temperature requirement.

How the EXAIR Cabinet Cooler System Works

In order to properly recommend a unit, we need to know the internal heat load of the cabinet or watt loss of the controls inside. We realize this information is sometimes not readily available, so to help simplify the process, we have a Sizing Guide available, which provides the pertinent information requited to calculate the current load. Of course, you can always give us a call and an application engineer can help you over the phone as well.

Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide

 

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

EXAIR Cabinet Cooler System Meets High Demands Of Sea Duty

I joined the Navy, right after high school, to get out of Ohio, see the world, and never come back. “My recruiter said” (if you are considering military service, those can be famous last words, just so you know) that I would be a good candidate for Nuclear Power School, so I took the test. As a math & science nerd scholar, I qualified for admission easily.  About halfway through Nuke School, I volunteered for submarines.  My decision was based in no small part on the sea stories of our instructors, the strong reputation of better food, and my deep appreciation for the movie “Operation Petticoat.”

Upon graduation, I was assigned to a new construction Trident submarine.  I did not see the world…I saw the Electric Boat shipyard in Groton, Connecticut, and Naval Submarine Base King’s Bay, Georgia.  Hilarity occasionally ensued, but never in the context of that movie I so adored.  I moved back to Ohio (on purpose) soon after my enlistment was up.  The food WAS good…I can unreservedly vouch for that.

In the new construction environment of the shipyard, I became quite familiar, and developed a deep respect for, the high level of attention paid to the materials and workmanship that a seagoing vessel demanded…not to mention, one with a nuclear reactor on board.  Reliability and durability are obviously key factors.

I had the pleasure recently of assisting an electrical contractor who was looking for a cooling solution for a new Variable Frequency Drive enclosure installation on a cement barge.  The ship’s engineer (a Navy veteran himself) had told the contractor that his priorities were reliability, durability, and dust exclusion.  He couldn’t have made a better case for an EXAIR Cabinet Cooling System.

Based on the specified heat load of the VFD, the size of the enclosure, and its location, a Model 4380 Thermostat Controlled NEMA 12 Cabinet Cooler System, rated at 5,600 Btu/hr, was specified.  This equipment is internal to the ship; had it been exposed to the elements, a NEMA 4X system would have been presented.

Up to 2,800 Btu/hr cooling capacity with a single Cabinet Cooler System (left) or as much as 5,600 Btu/hr with a Dual system (right.)

EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Systems have no moving parts to wear, no electric motor to burn out, and no heat transfer surfaces (like a refrigerant-based unit’s fins & tubes) to foul.  Once it’s properly installed on a sealed enclosure, the internal components never see anything but cold, clean air.

If you have a need to protect an electrical enclosure in aggressive environment, give me a call.  With a wide range of Cabinet Cooler Systems to meet a variety of needs, we’ve got the one you’re looking for, in stock and ready to ship.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
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Video Blog – Installing an EXAIR NEMA 4/4X Cabinet Cooler

Installing an EXAIR Cabinet Cooler is fast and easy.  Watch the video below to see what it takes to install an EXAIR NEMA 4/4X Cabinet Cooler.  And, for a video showing how to install the Cold Air Distribution Kit after the Cabinet Cooler is installed, click here.

If you have any questions about our products, feel free to call an Application Engineer.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

 

Thanks to Bensound for the royalty free music in this video!

Video Blog: Assembling the Dual Cabinet Cooler Hardware Kit

Dual Cabinet Cooler Systems consist of two Cabinet Coolers and a model 4908 Dual Cabinet Cooler Hardware Kit.  This hardware kit will connect the Cabinet Coolers together for a single compressed air supply port. This video shows you how to assemble the hardware kit to the Cabinet Coolers, and then illustrates installing the Dual Cabinet Cooler System on an enclosure.

John Ball
Application Engineer
Email: johnball@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_jb

 

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