Hazardous Locations need Cabinet Cooling too!

Hazardous Locations are a tricky opponent for electrical panels and controls. To safely be in a HAZLOC they either have to be rated for that Environment or they need to be enclosed in a Cabinet that is purged and pressurized to keep any explosive gases, fumes, or dusts out of the Cabinet. This is no new thing, however as the Industrial revolution 4.0 continues to grow and progress products are continually being added to HAZLOC areas. For example, robotic controls, analyzers, motors and switch gears now use electronic accessories to meet the needs for, speed, process control and energy efficiency, which often renders the equipment unsuitable for use in hazardous locations.  While the demand for these new devices continues to grow, not all of these items are able to be made intrinsically safe. And the items that are not will need to be enclosed in a cabinet where heat will build and you need to manage that heat load while retaining the positive pressure a purge and pressurization is putting on the panel.
EXAIR HazLoc Cabinet Cooler Systems are rated for Class I Div 1 & 2, Class II Div 1 & 2, and Class III environments.
First, we need to know what Class, Division, Group and Temp Code your area falls in. Area Classification Methods  The NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) establishes area classifications using three factors. Identified as Classes, Groups and Divisions, these factors are combined to define conditions of specific areas. Class Ratings – Classes are used to define the explosive or ignitable substances that are present in the atmosphere. Class I – Flammable gases or liquid vapor. Class II – Ignitable metal, carbon or organic dusts. Class III – Ignitable fibrous materials. Division Ratings – Divisions are used to define the degree of hazard by determining the explosive or ignitable substance’s expected concentration in the atmosphere. Division 1 – Contains substances under normal conditions Division 2 – Contains substances under abnormal conditions Group RatingsGroups are used to define substances by rating their explosive or ignitable nature, in relation to other known substances. TYPICAL CLASS I SUBSTANCES Group A – Acetylene Group B – Hydrogen or > 30% Hydrogen by Volume Group C – Ethyl Ether & Ethylene Group D – Acetone, Ammonia, Benzene & Gasoline TYPICAL CLASS II SUBSTANCES Group E – Aluminum, Magnesium & Alloys Group F – Carbon, Coke & Coal Group G – Flour, Grain, Wood, Plastic & Chemicals Temperature Class – A Temperature Class is a term that is allocated within a hazardous area or zone to instruments and equipment. The classification or rating signifies the levels of thermal energy allowed in a particular area or produced by specific equipment. EXAIR products are Able to be used in locations at or lower than T3C. EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Systems are available, from stock, to suit most any electric/electronic panel heat protection need:
  • Cooling capacities from 275 to 5,600 Btu/hr. Call me if your heat load is outside this range…we can look at customized solutions too.
  • NEMA 12 (IP54), 4, or 4X (IP66) ratings.
  • Thermostat Control – Standard, or Electronic Temperature Control.
  • Non-Hazardous Purge for contaminant exclusion on less-than-ideally sealed enclosures.
  • High Temperature models for ambient temperatures from 125°F (52°C) to 200°F (93°C).
  • Side Mount Kits when space is limited above the panel.
  • 316SS construction for particularly aggressive environments.
  • UL Classified for hazardous locations,
    • Class 1 Div 1, Groups A,B,C and D
    • Class 2 Div 1, Groups E,F, and G
    • Class 3
    • Temp T3C
When choosing products for use in classified areas, it’s critical to ensure safety through compliance, and the HazLoc Cabinet Cooler Systems allow you to do that, with simplicity and reliability.  If you’d like to discuss an enclosure cooling application, in or out of a classified area, give us a call. Jordan Shouse Application Engineer Send me an Email Find us on the Web  Like us on Facebook Twitter: @EXAIR_JS

Video Blog: Cabinet Cooler® System Calculator

In may I wrote a Blog Announcing our new Calculator tool on EXAIR.COM! You can read it here!

The Video below will walk you through how to get the information you need to fill the form in, and take you all the way to final where you can add it to your cart!

By providing certain information like size of the enclosure, NEMA rating needed, and environmental conditions, this new calculator will sort through our large selection of ready-to-ship Cabinet Cooler® Systems and provide instant feedback on the best model number for any applicable electrical enclosure.  Taking the guess work out of the equation, EXAIR’s Calculator ensures the customer that they can be confident in selecting the correct product for their unique specifications. You can even Print the form for your records!

If you have any questions or need additional support with the Sizing Calculator please reach out to one of our application Engineers give us a call. Or shoot us an email to techelp@exair.com

Jordan Shouse
Application Engineer

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Henri Coanda and his Effect on Compressed Air

Henri defined the Coanda Effect – the tendency of a jet of fluid emerging from an orifice to follow an adjacent flat or curved surface and to entrain fluid from the surroundings so that a region of lower pressure develops.

Compressed air flows through the inlet (1) to the Full Flow (left) or Standard (right) Air Knife, into the internal plenum. It then discharges through a thin gap (2), adhering to the Coanda profile (3) which directs it down the face of the Air Knife. The precision engineered & finished surfaces optimize entrainment of air (4) from the surrounding environment.

Henri-Marie Coanda (1885-1972) discovered the Coanda Effect in1930. He observed that a stream of air (fluid) emerging from a nozzle tends to follow a nearby curved surface, if the curvature of the surface or angle the surface makes with the stream is not too sharp. For example, if a stream of fluid is flowing along a solid surface which is curved slightly from the stream, the fluid will tend to follow the surface.

A number EXAIR products are designed to utilize the Coanda Effect and aid their performance. In some products, the Coanda Effect aids to create an amplification area where additional ambient air is drawn into the total airflow to increase total volume of air upon a target. This creates a more efficient and effective product. Also, since not as much compressed air is required, the noise levels decrease for products like EXAIR’s air knives, air nozzles, air jets and air amplifiers. EXAIR has been successful with positive impact for compressed air energy savings and noise reductions helping us meet or exceed OSHA Standard 29 CFR-1910.95 9(a) Maximum Allowable Noise Exposure.

Please contact EXAIR with regards to our Intelligent Compressed Air Products. We can help you with your next cooling, blow-off, drying or any compressed air needs.

Eric Kuhnash
Application Engineer
Email: erickuhnash@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_EK

1- Spoon Coanda image- https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/deed.en

Vortex Tubes Create Freeze Seals For Maintenance on Water Lines

Freeze plugs or Freeze seals are regularly used in nuclear reactor fluid systems to drain or isolate components that, for various reasons, cannot be conveniently isolated by valving. Once they are isolated, they are able to perform maintenance or upgrades without shutting down an entire system.

The United State Navy utilizes a large vortex tube to supply -50°F cooled air stream into a freeze jacket around the pipe. A time frame is chosen based on pipe size and fluid in the pipe to verify they are generating adequate cooling.  Temperature monitoring is put in place, flow through the pipe is stopped, and cooling of the freeze seal begins.  The water near the walls of the pipe freezes first.  Next, the frozen liquid continues towards the center until a solid plug of ice exists.  The freeze seal is then subcooled to a pre-determined temperature at which point the freeze is considered equivalent to a shut valve. Between the Ice plug and the small bit of pipe shrinkage at the point of cooling these seals are able to hold back thousands of pounds! (See drawing below, Shrinkage exaggerated for viewing)

Vortex Based Freeze Seal

In the attached photo bellow, (Provided by the U.S. Navy, photo by John Lenzo) this is a Freeze seal training Rig! You will see three colored lines, Blue is the cold air flow supplied by the vortex tube, red is the hot air from the vortex tube is exhausting away from the application location, and yellow is the pipe they are creating the freeze seal on. Surrounding that pipe is a jacket that holds the -50°F air in contact with the pipe.

With careful temperature monitoring in place and backup cooling methods on standby the work up stream can start.  Coolant flow throughout the rest of the system can now be reestablished.  Following the repair, flow will again be stopped for several hours while the freeze seal is given time to melt.  This ensures that the ice plug is not shot through the now repaired machine.

If you think you have an application that would benefit from Vortex tube technology, give us a call! We have a team of Application Engineers in from 7AM-4PM EST M-F! Or shoot us an email to techelp@exair.com and one of those Engineers will reach out to you!

Jordan Shouse
Application Engineer

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Freeze Seal Image Provided by the U.S. Navy