Hazardous Location Cabinet Cooler Systems “Make Things Better”

In a previous arc in my career path, I worked on, and then built, and then sold industrial pumps, so I’ve been in my fair share of chemical plants. Did you ever wonder what all these places make? A decent number of them make what are called “intermediates”. These are compounds, solutions, & substances that aren’t found in stores, but go into almost all of the goods that ARE found in stores. One such company used to make commercials that explained it nicely:

I recently had the pleasure of assisting a caller from a company like this, who wanted to install three of our Hazardous Location Cabinet Cooler Systems in their facility. This particular company doesn’t make anything shown in the commercial above; they make intermediates for agricultural use (to paraphrase the commercial, “they don’t make fertilizer; they make fertilizer better”). As is the case in MANY chemical plants, a good portion of their real estate is classified as hazardous area (as defined by regulatory oversight agencies) AND subject to exposure to some fairly corrosive chemicals. Now, these places all go to great lengths to ensure safety for personnel AND equipment, through compliance AND design. So, when they needed to add durable & reliable heat protection to their electrical panels, they called EXAIR.

This was a pretty easy application, as the engineer I spoke to had gotten the internal heat loads from the equipment supplier, and already knew that 316SS construction was needed for the corrosive elements the equipment could be exposed to. The panel was in a Class I Div 2 area (flammable gasses or vapors may be present in the event of an accident or during unusual operating conditions). After calculating the external heat load, we specified a Model HZ4725SS-316 NEMA 4X (316SS Construction) Hazardous Location Cabinet Cooler System, rated for 1,700 Btu/hr, and Model 902021 24VDC HazLoc Solenoid Valve. These panels came equipped with temperature monitors that they could wire our valves into, otherwise we’d have supplied Thermostat Controlled systems.

EXAIR HazLoc Cabinet Cooler Systems are rated for Class I Div 1 & 2, Class II Div 1 & 2, and Class III environments.

EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Systems are available, from stock, to suit most any electric/electronic panel heat protection need:

  • Cooling capacities from 275 to 5,600 Btu/hr. Call me if your heat load is outside this range…we can look at customized solutions too.
  • NEMA 12 (IP54), 4, or 4X (IP66) ratings.
  • Thermostat Control – Standard, or Electronic Temperature Control.
  • Non-Hazardous Purge for contaminant exclusion on less-than-ideally sealed enclosures.
  • High Temperature models for ambient temperatures from 125°F (52°C) to 200°F (93°C).
  • Side Mount Kits when space is limited above the panel.
  • 316SS construction for particularly aggressive environments.
  • UL Classified for hazardous locations, just like the one I wrote about above.

If you’d like to find out how easy it is to provide durable and reliable heat protection for your electrical panels, give me a call.

Russ Bowman, CCASS

Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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Class 2 Div 1, Groups E, F, G Cabinet Coolers

When it comes to electrical equipment, and in our case electrical cabinets, there are regulations we all must follow for safety concerns from hazardous locations. There are explosion hazards that occur when handling flammable gases, vapors and dust. Hazardous location regulations have been designated from the NEC, CEC, OSHA and the NFPA. There is also a Globally Harmonized System (GHE) that oversees labeling the hazards of products.

In the US the governing body for electrical hazards is the NEC (National Electric Code). In Canada, it is the CEC (Canadian Electric Code). These 2 agencies work very closely together in North America, and have very few differences – the main differences concern how and where signs are posted, not the hazards themselves. Both agencies utilize document NFPA 70 (National Fire Protection Agency) as the primary basis for all electrical hazard information and requirements. The NFPA 70 outlines the different Classes and Divisions.

As we look at our Class II Div 1 groups E,F, and G Cabinet Cooler Systems, where can we actually use them? First, they are to be used in conjunction with a purged and pressurized control, system. They are not a replacement of such systems but, rather, provide cooling for them. To fully understand the environments they can be used, we need to understand the class, division and group meanings so let’s dive in…

Let’s jump right into a brief overview of the Classifications. The classifications offer a precise description of the hazardous material that is (or most likely) in an area, so that the appropriate equipment can be used, and safe installations can occur. Sometimes these classifications are easily recognized, and many times they may take a detailed study of the site. There are 3 categories of hazardous materials which define the type of explosive (or flammable) that is present:

Pixabay Image licensed by Pixabay

Class I = Flammable vapors, gases or liquids – examples would be areas such as Gasoline storage, petroleum Refineries, Dry Cleaning Plants, Fuel Servicing Areas, Spray Finishing areas, etc…

Class II = Combustible dust – examples would be Grain elevators, Flour and feed mills, Metal powders manufacturers, coal plants, etc…

Class III = Ignitable Fibers and flyings – Examples would include sawdust areas, Textile mills, Cotton processing, Cotton Seed Mills, etc..

Now as we dissect this further, we will see that each of these “Classes” are divided into 2 divisions. We many times hear these expressed as Div1 and Div 2. The Divisions tells of the likelihood that a hazardous material may be present in a flammable concentration.

Division 1 = an area where the explosive or flammable vapors, gases, dust, fibers, or liquids (as mentioned in Class definitions) can exist under normal everyday operating conditions.

Division 2 = an area in which the dangerous vapors, gases, dust, fibers, or liquids are NOT likely to be present under normal operations.

After the Classes and the Divisions come the groups.

Class 1 has 4 groups, A-D. These are all gases.

Group A = Acetylene is in the air

Group B = Flammable gases with a Minimum Igniting Current (MIC) less than 0.40 such as hydrogen, butadiene, ethylene oxide, propylene oxide

Group C = Flammable gases with a Minimum Igniting Current (MIC) greater than 0.40 such as ethyl ether, ethylene, acetaldehyde, and cyclopropane

Group D = Flammable gases with a Minimum Igniting Current (MIC) greater than 0.80 such as acetone, ammonia, benzene, butane, ethanol, gasoline, methane, natural gas, naphtha, and propane.

Class II has 3 groups, E,F and G. These are all types of dust

Group E = Combustible Conductive metal dust such as aluminum and magnesium

Group F = Combustible electrically Non-Conductive dust such as coal, carbon, charcoal

Group G = Combustible dusts not included in E or F such as flour, grain, wood, plastic and chemicals.

As we come full circle here looking at our Class II, Div 1, Groups E,F, and G Cabinet Cooler systems, we now understand the following:

  • We know that these systems are perfect for areas that contain combustible dust such as coal dust, flour, grain and feed (Class II)
  • We also know that these will work well in areas where these combustible dusts are constantly present around this Cabinet Cooler (Div 1)
  • Lastly we understand that these are a great fit for all types of dusts, whether conductive or not (Groups E,F,G)

Please feel free to reach out to myself or any of the application engineers for further questions on this or any of our amazing products.

Thank you for stopping by,

Brian Wages

Application Engineer

EXAIR Corporation
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Cover photo by Clker-free-vector-images/29545, licensed by Pixabay

Overheating Cabinets Are Bad. Cabinet Cooler Systems on Promotion Are Good!

In southwest Ohio we are currently experiencing 88°F. And we have begun to see increased numbers of inquiries for Cabinet Cooler Systems to keep control cabinets cool. This comes with the territory of approaching summer here in the northern hemisphere, and elsewhere it is due to new machines going into areas of a facility where it is constantly hot and dirty. It seems like the perfect time to offer up some free stuff with our Cabinet Cooler Promotion.

That’s right, order any of the Cabinet Cooler® Systems listed and receive a free A/C Sensor Pen. This pen has saved me from getting shocked many of times around my home.   Without it of course, I find myself guessing I turned the correct breaker off and, as soon as I touch the outlet I am working on I get hit with 110V. This sensor is helpful to locate the presence of voltage and avoid getting shocked.

We are here to assist your choice of Cabinet Cooler system and to provide a very fast solution to the downtime you are experiencing. We manufacture Cabinet Cooler systems from 275 Btu/Hr through 5600 Btu/Hr with NEMA 12, 4 and 4X integrity as well as Hazardous Location. If you don’t know what Cabinet Cooler System you need, take a look at our new Cabinet Cooler Calculator or the form below. It can be found on our site, get the information and call, fax, e-mail or live chat with an Application Engineer to get a quick and accurate response on what amount of cooling your system will need.

Sizing Guide

Over our thirty years in business we have also seen many companies who only experience a short span of seasonal heat and have found that 2000 Btu/Hr is enough refrigeration to offset summertime heat load, in most cases. Choosing a model with a thermostat control will turn the cooler on and off as needed and minimize compressed air use. Cabinet Cooler systems are in STOCK and ship same day for domestic and Canadian orders received by 3:00 pm EDT. We can get your cabinet cooled FAST and eliminate your heat related problems. Cabinet Cooler systems are shipped ready to install through a standard electrical knockout. There is no waiting for oil to settle back into the compressor motor, no mounting templates required or huge holes to cut into your cabinet. Cabinet Cooler systems have no moving parts to wear, making them rugged and lasting in your hot environment.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Cabinet Cooler® System Calculator – EXAIR’s Latest Do-It-Yourself Tool!

At EXAIR we are constantly moving, changing, growing, and building products and tools to help anyone that comes into contact with us or our products. Evidence of this includes our continued launches of new product and tools that you can see in our Press Releases. Our newest tool provides a do-it-yourself solution to determine which Cabinet Cooler System model number your electrical or control panel will need. This easiest way to reach this new tool is to follow our websites Resource’s button to the Calculator Library. We have made the selection process easier and faster with this new calculator.

Historically, the Cabinet Cooler sizing guide was the fastest way to receive a recommendation – But now, the calculator provides a do-it-yourself solution with instant feedback!

While we have always offered the ability to fill out a Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide (above) and email, call, chat or fax the information to us. With the right amount of information provided, an e-mail will provide you an answer within 24 hours. With a phone call or online chat, we can get you an answer in 5-10 minutes. But now you can receive instant feedback as to which Cabinet Cooler System is needed to combat an overheating cabinet by using the Cabinet Cooler Calculator. We have poured our knowledge and experience from over the years into the tool to best fit to our standards of correctly calculating and compensating for diverse environments and demands of electrical panels.

With some basic information on the panel, environment, and compressed air available, the calculator will calculate the internal heat load, external heat load, compensate for non-optimal compressed air temperature or pressure, and solar heat load(where applicable) then show the exact model number needed to reach the desired temperature for the panel. You can then immediately learn more about that specific model or order that model online. Of course you can also reach out to anyone here at EXAIR and receive answers to additional questions and or place the order with an actual person.

If you want to discuss your overheating panels or if you have some questions on why we are asking for certain variables on the Cabinet Cooler Calculator, feel free to contact us.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF