EXAIR GEN 4 Super Ion Air Knife

Super Ion Air Knife

EXAIR GEN 4 Super Ion Air Knives remove static electricity from plastics, webs, sheet stock and other product surfaces where tearing, jamming, debris or hazardous shocks are a problem. The laminar sheet of air sweeps surfaces clean of static, particulate, dust and dirt. Production speed, product quality and surface cleanliness can improve dramatically.

The GEN 4 Super Ion Air Knife floods an area or surface with static eliminating ions – up to 20 feet (6.1 m) away. A uniform airflow across its length will not cause misalignments to critical surfaces such as webs. Force can be adjusted from a “blast” to a “breeze”. The GEN 4 Super Ion Air Knife is electrically powered, shockless and has no moving parts. It also only requires 3.7 SCFM of compressed air per foot of length at 5 PSIG (105 SLPM per 300mm of length at 0.3 BAR). The sound level is also surprisingly quiet at 50dBA for most applications.

Compressed air flows through an inlet (1) into the plenum chamber of the GEN 4 Super Ion Air Knife. The flow is directed to a precise, slotted orifice. The primary air flow exits, it creates a uniform sheet of air across the entire length that immediately pulls in surrounding room air (2). An electrically powered GEN 4 Ionizing Bar (3) fills the curtain of air with positive and negative charge. The airstream delivers these static eliminating ions to the product surface (4) where it instantly neutralizes static and cleans dust and other particulates.

EXAIR’s GEN 4 Super Ion Air Knives offer a convenient, safe and reliable method for eliminating static charge while improving efficiency and quality. If you have questions or need help selecting the right product for your application please contact on of our Application Engineers.

Eric Kuhnash
Application Engineer
E-mail: EricKuhnash@exair.com
Twitter: Twitter: @EXAIR_EK

What OSHA 1910.242(b) Means For Compressed Air Product Users

Medically speaking, our skin is an organ…and an amazing one at that. It protects our internals from an incredibly harsh environment as we’re bombarded by radiation (sunlight), subjected to summer’s heat & the cold of winter, attacked by fierce invaders (from viruses & bacteria to insects & spiders), all while we carry on at the bottom of a 60 mile-deep ocean (of air!)

Our skin requires some protection too: Sunscreen mitigates some of the harmful effects of solar radiation, shoes protect our feet from the ground, gloves & coats prevent frostbite, and compliance with OSHA Standard 1910.242(b) protects operators who use compressed air devices for cleaning purposes from air embolisms. That’s when air, under pressure, has enough energy to break the skin (tough as it is) and reach the tissue underneath. It’s painful, and serious enough that the victim should absolutely seek emergency medical treatment. If the air breaks a blood vessel and enters the pulmonary system, it can be deadly, in a hurry.

In 1971, the U.S. Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) determined that air under pressure higher than 30 pounds per square inch is capable of causing such injuries, if the pressurized source is dead-ended into the skin. Based on this determination, they included the following verbiage in Standard 1910.242, regulating the safe operation of hand and portable powered tools & equipment:


1910.242(b) Compressed air used for cleaning. Compressed air shall not be used for cleaning purposes except where reduced to less than 30 p.s.i. and then only with effective chip guarding and personal protective equipment.


In February 1972, OSHA issued Instruction STD 01-13-001 to clarify the meaning of 1910.242(b), with two illustrations of acceptable methods to meet compliance. The first is the use of a pressure reducer (or regulator):

While this method is compliant with the OSHA Standard, it’s kind of impractical, since you’re not going to get a whole lot of cleaning done with such a low energy air flow. If that’s not bad enough, it’s STILL going to be loud, and wasteful as far as the cost of compressed air goes.

The other method illustrated in the Instruction’s enclosures involves the nozzles themselves:

Compressed air product manufacturers use this method to make OSHA compliant Nozzles.

One design that complies with OSHA 1910.242(b) using this method is the cross drilled nozzle:

Unless it’s blocked off, practically all of the air flow goes straight out the end, but if you block off the end, it all goes out the cross drilled hole. As long that hole is properly sized, you won’t build up 30 psi at the main outlet.

If you’re not concerned about high operating cost or deafening noise, you can stop reading now; these are all you need for OSHA compliance with Standard 1910.242(b). If you DO care about spending less money on compressed air or complying with OSHA Standard 1910.95(a) (which you read all about here), let’s spend a minute on engineered compressed air nozzles:

EXAIR Super Air Nozzles discharge compressed air through an annular array of holes, recessed between a series of fins. This causes the primary (compressed air) stream to entrain an enormous amount of air from the surrounding environment.

In addition to making them cost less to operate (since most of the total developed air flow is entrained), they’re also VERY quiet (since the entrained air forms a boundary layer on the outside of the air stream), AND they can’t be dead ended:

Since the fins won’t allow for a complete blockage of the compressed air discharging from the Super Air Nozzle, this design is a prime example of a built-in “relief device” as defined by Instruction STD 01-13-001, above.

All EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air Products, in fact, incorporate a form of built-in “relief device”:

The overhang of the cap on the Flat Super Air Nozzles and the Super Air Knives prevent them from being dead ended.

If you’d like to discuss safe use of compressed air, it’s one of our primary goals here at EXAIR – give me a call.

Russ Bowman, CCASS

Application Engineer
EXAIR LLC
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Super Air Knife Shims & How They Affect Performance

To Shim or not to Shim… The Super Air Knife is a fabulous piece of equipment. Between the quiet laminar flow of air, and the intense 40 to 1 ratio of entraining the ambient air around it, this Knife is definitely cutting edge (pun intended). As you look at the front edge of the Super Air Knife, or as we call it “the place where the magic happens“, you will see that there is a very small slit or gap where the air flows. The gap in that metal is caused by the shim that is inside the Super Air Knife. We control the size of this gap with shims. Hark, what light through yonder air gap breaks?… Sorry, I get carried away sometimes.

The shims in the Aluminum Super Air Knives are made of a polyester plastic, the PVDF Super Air Knife Shims are made of PTFE, and I will give you two guesses what the Stainless Steel Super Air Knife Shims are made of, you guessed it… Flubber… Just kidding, they are stainless steel of course.

All of our Super Air Knives, regardless of material, ship standard with a 2 thou shim installed. 2 thou you ask? I did too. That is 2 thousandths of an inch, or 0.002″. This is the height of the gap where the Air Flows out. When you are looking at all of our published numbers in the catalogue or on the website, all of those performance numbers are based on this 2 thou shim. Here is the Super Air Knife performance table:

Pic by Conmongt, licensed by Pixabay

So, what if you need more or less air than what’s on this list? We can adjust the gap. We can add shims up to @ 0.01″ to increase the flow. Or we can go down to 0.001″ (1 thou). This poses the question of, what happens to performance? The good news with the shims is that the Air Consumption is a direct linear proportion to this performance table, and the force is very close to the same. So if you double to a 4 thou shim, you double the air consumption and force. Velocity and sound level will vary, but I do not have data to what degree.

As we size these, generally see people wanting more air, larger gaps (more shims), But conversely, we can decrease the air flow down to a 1 thou shim (1/2 of the published values above). Technically we can go smaller than 1 thou, but there is a limit to where a hole is no longer a hole. Here is a breakdown of our stock shims, with colors and sizes for the Super Air Knives:

The Super Air Knives are in a class of their own. As long as you feed the Super Air Knives enough air (SCFM) you can run them at most any psig to retrieve the desired air flow for you application. As an added means of flexibility, you can change the gap size with shims. I have put in a request to change the name of these to Super Flexible Air Knives, but I’m not holding my breath.

Public Domain Picture Licensed by Pixabay

One more thing about Shims. We can customize your shims!! Now I am not talking about putting your logo on them (but money talks!!), but we can customize your length. Let me give you an example. Let’s say that you need 58″ of airflow, no more no less. Our standard length Super Air Knives are 54″ and 60″. We can make you a custom knife, which is a great option, but for 1 or 2, this is probably not very cost-effective. But we can make you a custom shim. We can have the knife only push 58″ of air with a shim blocking the rest. Furthermore, you can decide if you want 58″ centered on the knife, or all 58″ starting from the left, or right side. It is a very cost-effective way to get a custom flow width.

Please let me know of you have any questions, or would like to discuss any of this further.

Thank you for stopping by,

Brian Wages

Application Engineer

EXAIR Corporation
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Compressed Air Usage in Food & Beverage Industry: Bottle Blowoff with Super Air Knives

When it comes to the usage of compressed air in the food & beverage industry, applications for EXAIR products are abundant. The range of sizes (3″ through 108″) and materials (aluminum, 303SS, 316SS, and PVDF) allow us to handle corrosive, high temperature and chemical environments.

One common process that we’re able to help improve is on bottling or canning lines for a wide variety of different companies in the beverage industry. These processes generally run at a very high speed and need a way to complete the process with as little manual intervention as possible.

I recently helped a customer that was looking for a better solution for their bottle processing line. The company produces bottled water in South America and was dealing with a series of quality issues. After the bottles are filled and sealed, they go through a washing operation to remove any contaminants from the outside of the bottle. Afterwards, they make their way along a conveyor where a label is applied around the outside of the bottle. The bottles aren’t always completely dry by the time they get to the labeling step. Any residual moisture on the outside of the bottle can present a problem where the label doesn’t fully adhere to the bottle.

After complaints from their customer about product being received with labels that were peeling off, they implemented a quality check to ensure that the bottles that weren’t properly labeled were fixed before they were shipped out. While this resolved the problem for their customer, it required an extra step. Not only does this add an entire step to the process, but it requires several additional operators to perform the manual task of removing and replacing faulty labels.

After searching and discovering EXAIR’s Super Air Knife they reached out for assistance. Due to the variability of the bottle sizes, they needed a solution that was easily adjusted based on what product was being run that day. Fortunately, EXAIR offers a Universal Mounting System for our Super Air Knives that’ll allow them to easily position their blowoff as they need.

The solution was to install (2) 110036 36” Super Air Knives with (2) Universal Mounting Systems for each. Any knife 24”-54” will necessitate (2) Universal Mounting Systems, 55”-71” will require (3), 72”-95”, and 96” and over will require (5) to sufficiently support the weight of the knife.

The knives provided a strong blast of air that was able to remove any residual moisture from the exterior of the bottles. This eliminated the need to have a post labeling inspection and the bottles were labeled properly on the first go! Adjustments in between different bottle sizes were made simple with the help of the Universal Mounting System.

SAK pre label blowoff
(2) 110036 Super Air Knives positioned with Universal Mounting System

At EXAIR, we’re all about providing safe, efficient, and reliable solutions to a host of industry related problems. With same day shipment for stock items with an order received by 2:00 ET and a team of highly trained Application Engineers, we’re ready to take your call and get a solution out to you today. Don’t just take my word for it, find out for yourself!

Tyler Daniel, CCASS

Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@EXAIR.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD