Get your EXAIR Catalog

I consider myself a bit Old Fashion when it comes to product catalogs! (As I sit here and look at my 3,968 page McMaster-Carr Catalog!) There’s something nice about having everything you need right in front of you. Yes I know everything is on our website also, and its a pretty slick website if I do say so myself! Check out this blog about our new and improved website! Website Blog But there is something about a paper catalog you can flip thru and see all the options!

EXAIR’s Catalog 33 is 224 pages, and covers all 16 product lines from Air Knives to Cabinet Cooler systems, to industrial vacuums. All of our cataloged products are in stock and ready to ship! Not only will you be able to find part numbers, Dimensions, Product specifications and performance. You will also find application photos to help you use the products the best way!

To get your hands on one you can either shoot a email to techelp@exair.com, or jump over to our website and provide your information and one will be shipped out! Order A Catalog Here

Jordan Shouse
Application Engineer

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Vortex Tubes Video – How Fast Can They Produce Cold Air?

Today’s video is going to showcase for you just how fast an EXAIR Vortex Tube or spot cooling product produces cold air to published values. The answer may surprise you. Take a couple minutes and watch, then if you have any questions or want to discuss it further, please contact an Application Engineer.

A Vortex Tube produces cold air instantly, cools down the temperature probe in seconds!

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Case Study: Adjustable Spot Cooler Saves Thousands of Dollars in the Textile Industry

A few months ago I got a call from a major producer of high-performance knitted products who operates 128 Spindle motors on circular sock machines (CSM) that require couplings. These couplings use hi-speed, hi-temperature bearings that have been failing regularly, prior to the predicted run life. This was resulting in loss of production while the CSM is down and the bearings are replaced, repair costs associated with refurbishing the failed CSM bearing include labor, new bearings, lost production, etc. The average cost of a failed CSM bearing including lost production was around $1925.00 and on average they were seeing 180 premature failures each year.

Bearing Housing

My recommendation was using a 3925 Adjustable Spot Cooler System with the dual outlets to spread the cooling around the bearing. They had tried fans and electric blowers and they noticed no benefits. How ever when they placed the 3925 on the largest trouble maker that was burning bearings at the highest rate they noticed a prolonged lifetime of over 260%!!!!

3925 In Action
Hard Plumbed into place.

The enhanced run life of the CSMs was noticed immediately as the non-cooled CSM bearings continued to fail at a much higher rate when compared to the positions with the Exair Spot Coolers installed.

Based on the average cost of a failed CSM bearing including lost production ($1925.00) and an average of (180) premature failures each year, their estimated annual savings using the Adj. Spot Cooler is $346,500.00 on just the 12 high fail rate machines they have put these on to date. They are expecting to place a 3295 on every CSM within 5 years focusing on the high fail rate machines first. 

If you think the Adjustable Spot cooler can help your process, give us a call or shoot us an email!

Jordan Shouse
Application Engineer

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Vortex Tube Cold Fraction and how it Affects Flow and Temperature Control

Vortex Tubes are the perfect solution when dealing with a variety of spot cooling applications. They use compressed air to produce a cold air stream and a hot air stream, with temperatures ranging from as low as -50°F  up to +260°F (based on ambient supply temperature) and providing as much as 10,200 Btu/hr. of cooling capacity. By simply adjusting the valve in the hot end of the Vortex Tube, you are able to control the “cold fraction” which is the percentage of air consumed by the vortex tube that is exhausted as cold air versus the amount of air exhausted as hot air. Our small, medium and large Vortex Tubes provide the same temperature drop and rise, it’s the volume of air that changes with the various sizes.

The unique physical phenomenon of the Vortex Tube principle generates cold air instantly, and for as long – or short – a time as needed.

When looking at the below performance chart, you will see that “Pressure Supply” and “Cold Fraction %” setting all play a part in changing the performance of the Vortex Tubes. Take for example, an operating pressure of 100 PSIG and cold fraction setting of 20%, you will see a 123°F drop on the cold side versus a 26°F temperature rise on the hot side. By the using the same Vortex Tube and keeping the operating pressure at 100 PSIG but changing the cold fraction to 80%, you will now see a 54°F temperature drop on the cold side and a 191° rise at the hot end.

Vortex Tube Performance Data
Vortex Tube Performance Chart

We’ve looked at how the cold fraction changes the temperature, but how does it change the flow for the various Models?

Say you are using a Model # 3240 Medium Vortex Tube which consumes 40 SCFM @ 100 PSIG. Again with the cold fraction set at 80% (80% of the consumed compressed air out of the cold end), you would flow 32 SCFM at the cold air exhaust.

40 SCFM x 0.8 (80% CF) = 32 SCFM

Using the same Model # 3240 Medium Vortex Tube but now with a 20% cold fraction (20% of consumed compressed air out of the cold end), you would flow 8 SCFM at the cold exhaust.

40 SCFM x 0.20 (20% CF) = 8 SCFM

As you can see, to achieve the colder air temperatures, the volume of cold air being exhausted is reduced as well. This is important to consider when making a Model selection. Some other considerations include the operating pressure which also has a significant effect on performance. The compressed air supply temperature is important because the above temperatures are temperature differentials, so in the example of the 80% cold fraction there is a 115F temperature drop from your inlet compressed air temperature.

If you need additional assistance, you can always contact myself or another application engineer and we would be happy to make the best selection to fit your specific need.

Jordan Shouse
Application Engineer

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