EXAIR Air Nozzle Provides Non-Marring Solution For Rotary Die Cutting

Die Cutting is a highly efficient means to produce large volumes of uniquely shaped parts while creating a low volume of wasted materials. There are several different ways to produce die cut parts with one of the more common being Rotary Die Cutting. A Rotary Die Cutter typically incorporates the material passing between a roller die cutter and a heavy roller anvil to cut the specific shape  then passes the material down a conveyor or feed line while retrieving the waste material in another collection device.

I recently worked with a customer who was starting to see a large volume of scrap in their vinyl and rubber parts die cutting process as the die cut parts themselves were getting stuck onto the rolling die cutter and weren’t getting grabbed by the conveyor rollers. To try and get the parts to eject from the cutter they installed a few 1/4″ open copper tube air lines running across the roller but were concerned with amount of air they were wasting and the high pitch noise levels of close to 100 dBA. They were also seeing some damage to the parts they were able to get loosened from the die as some of the parts would make contact with the pipe, causing a “blemish” on the part, ultimately failing inspection.

I recommend the customer use our Model # 1100-PEEK Super Air Nozzle. The Model # 1100 consumes only 14 SCFM of compressed air (at 80 PSIG), much less than a 1/4″ open pipe, tested at close to 140 SCFM @ 80 PSIG. This nozzle produces a low sound level of only 74 dBA falling well within the allowable noise exposure levels set forth by OSHA. In addition, the PEEK plastic construction provides a non-marring solution in the event one of the parts did make contact with the nozzle.

1100-peek

1100-specs Model # 1100-PEEK Super Air Nozzle with Performance Specs

EXAIR offers a large selection of engineered air nozzles with varying airflow patterns, force, sound levels and materials of construction to meet a wide variety of application requirements. With help selecting the best solution or to discuss your particular application, please give us a call.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

EXAIR’s High Velocity and Adjustable Air Jets – Now Available in Stainless Steel

Newly released, the EXAIR High Velocity Air Jet and Adjustable Air Jet are now available in Type 303 Stainless Steel, providing greater durability, corrosion resistance and a higher maximum temperature rating of 400 °F.  Type 303 stainless steel has good resistance to mildly corrosive atmospheres along with good oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures, making the stainless steel Air Jet a great choice for blowoff or part drying in your harsh environment. Both types of Air Jets are also available in brass, for applications at 275°F and below, and when corrosion resistance is not as critical.

6013ss

Model 6013SS – High Velocity Air Jet

Air Jets utilize the Coanda Effect – wall attachment of a high velocity fluid – to produce air motion in their surroundings. As illustrated above, a small amount of compressed air to the inlet (large black arrow) is throttled through an internal ring nozzle above sonic velocity.  A vacuum is produced, resulting in large volumes of surrounding, or “free” air, being pulled in through the jet (blue arrows.)

air jet How Air Jets Work

Both the outlet and inlet can be ducted for remote positioning applications.

If the end is blocked, flow simply reverses at well below OSHA dead end pressure requirements, ensuring safe operation.

The High Velocity Air Jet comes standard with an .015″ shim, and a Shim Set is offered that includes .006″ and  .009″ shims to provide additional adjustability and control.  The Adjustable Air Jet has a variable gap design, and can be adjusted and locked to meet the required airflow and thrust parameters.

When you are needing a simple solution to reduce excessive air consumption and noise levels on compressed air blowoff operations, EXAIR has a large line of Air Nozzles and Jets to solve your problems. You can contact an Application Engineer to discuss which Air Jet or Nozzle to best fit your application.

Brian Bergmann
Application Engineer

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A Tale Of Two Cooling Applications

There are many, many ways to cool something down. Which method works best will depend on a number of factors, but the biggies are:

*How hot is it?
*How cool do you need it?

If you call EXAIR to discuss a cooling application, these are most likely the first questions that’ll be asked. And the answers will determine which product line we start talking about. In the title of this blog, I promised you two tales…here’s the first:

A caller from a metal fabricating shop needed to cool down metal cylinders after they were heated to 400F, and was curious to know if this was a good application for one of our products. Now, he had already answered one of our questions, so the answer to the second would tell the rest of the tale.

Turns out, they only needed to get down to 120F or so, which made this an excellent application for our Super Air Knives…they’re going to blow a laminar, high volume flow of ambient temperature air onto the part. We knew this from a past application that was so well documented that we included it in our catalog…you can read all about it on page 21 (if you don’t have one, get one – it’s free.) But for now, here’s a graph of the cooling rate comparison with the Super Air Knife:

While the fans no doubt made for large volume air movement, the laminar flow of the Super Air Knife resulted in a much faster heat transfer rate.

While the fans no doubt made for high volume air movement, it was also very turbulent.  The laminar flow of the Super Air Knife resulted in a much faster heat transfer rate.

When I showed this to the caller, that was all the convincing it took…their goal was to reach 120F in about a minute and a half.  Which, as you can see, will be no problem for the Super Air Knife.

Tale #2 is a bit different.  This was from a firearms manufacturer who needed to cool small, but hot, parts quickly, and they needed to reach room temperature.  Looking at the graph above, we know that blowing room temperature air on a hot part will cool it rapidly, until the temperature of the part begins to approach room temperature.  The solution?  Colder air, of course!

Enter the EXAIR Vortex Tube…after some discussion of the part size, shape, and their compressed air capacity, we determined the Model 3215 Medium Vortex Tube should be suitable for their operation.  By generating a cold air flow of about 20F, this replicated the higher temperature differential we see in the left-hand side of the cooling graph above…where the cooling rate was the highest.

If you’d like to talk about how “cool” an EXAIR product can make your application, give me a call.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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EXAIR Reversible Drum Vac Solved a Big Issue that Electric Vacuums Have

Reversible Drum Vac Family

Reversible Drum Vac Family

An industrial contractor used a walk-behind cement saw to cut out and revamp cement floors in commercial buildings. In their operation, they used a lot of water to keep the diamond blades cool and the cement dust down.  A wet/dry vacuum was used for cleanup during and after the sawing operation.   But because of the dust and large amount of use, the electric motors in the wet/dry vac would fail.  The dust would migrate into the bearings of the motor, and you would start to hear a high pitch noise (a mark of the bearings starting to fail).  It wasn’t long, and the vacuum would stop working.

As with many people, they typically start with a lower priced vacuum model from their local hardware store. It was no different with this contractor.  He found out shortly that he was replacing the vacuum units every 4 to 6 weeks.  With the excessive down time and continuously running to the local hardware store, it was becoming too much.  He decided to spend the extra money and get an industrial type vacuum unit.  It had a 30 gallon tank, a drum dolly, and a 2 HP electric industrial motor.  He spent nearly $800.00 on this rugged vacuum, hoping that he would not have to purchase another unit for a while.  Even though the electric motor was heavy duty, it was no match for the cement dust.  This unit stopped working like the others after only six months of use.  After this failure, he decided to search for a better alternative.

When he contacted me about his issues with the short-lived operations of his electric vacuums, I knew EXAIR had a solution. I suggested our model 6396-30, a 30 gallon Premium Reversible Drum Vac System.  The 30 gallon size made it very easy to fit into his work truck and to setup at different locations.  With the Spill Recovery Kit included in this system, it made cleaning up the water/cement mixture quick and efficient.  The EXAIR vacuum generator has no moving parts or bearings to wear.  It is made from stainless steel construction which is very resistant to corrosion, and it is very quiet as it only has a decibel rating of 86 dBA.  For the commercial buildings that did not have compressed air yet, he used a portable compressor to operate his new Reversible Drum Vac.  With clean compressed air, this vacuum will last for many years; not months.

If you find that you are going through your electric vacuums or just would like to reduce the noise levels, EXAIR has a large line of Industrial Housekeeping Products. You can contact an Application Engineer to see if we have the right vacuum product for you.

John Ball
Application Engineer
Email: johnball@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_jb

Stop Trying To Squeeze More Out Of That Air Gun!

At EXAIR, we LOVE to talk about efficient use of compressed air. That’s why I was thrilled to get a call from an engineer that works for a non-profit firm that promotes energy efficiency to enable businesses in their area improve sustainability, improve the environment, and save money.

They were working with a local company to, among other things, optimize their use of compressed air and wanted to take advantage of our free Efficiency Lab service to get the “before” data on the current blow off devices.

Don't let this happen to your air gun...use an EXAIR Precision Safety Air Gun with a quiet, efficient Super Air Nozzle instead.

Don’t let this happen to your air gun…

Squeeze the trigger on a Model 1410SS Precision Safety Air Gun with Nano Super Air Nozzle instead!

Squeeze the trigger on a Model 1410SS Precision Safety Air Gun with Nano Super Air Nozzle instead!

As you can see, they were trying to “squeeze” a little more performance out by, literally, squeezing the tip down.  Thing is, it’s STILL loud and non-compliant with OSHA’s regulations about dead end pressure.  And as far as performance goes, this results in only a slight change in the air flow pattern, with a minimal reduction in compressed air consumption…they’ve changed the geometry of the discharge opening, but not the cross sectional area.  Our Efficiency Lab Test results provide the final answer:

cry for help lab

Efficiency. Saving money. Safety. Sustainability. “Going Green.”   If you’d like to talk about how EXAIR can help you with any…or all…of these things, give me a call.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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Full-Flow Air Knife is The Right Choice in Fiberglass Blanket Application

Last week I took a call from an automation company who had been working with a fiberglass insulation manufacturer on a blanket rolling application. After the manufacturing process, the fiberglass blankets are rolled up and a protective film wrap is placed around the ends. The end user was currently using a section of 3/8″ pipe with several 1/8″ holes drilled along the length to hold the ends of the blanket in place as the wrap is applied. The current setup was using a lot of compressed air and was creating an unbalanced airflow that was strong at one end but much weaker at the other, causing the ends of the blanket to begin to “roll up” and either damage the shrink wrap or the blanket itself. They also believed the setup was starving other processes in this particular area of the plant and initially were considering purchasing an auxiliary air compressor but due to the capital expense, instead reached out to the automation company for other options.

We have worked with this particular automation company in the past so they were familiar with our product offering and knew they wanted to use an EXAIR Air Knife in the application. However, they were unsure if they wanted to use our Super, Standard or Full-Flow Air Knife . Their need was to improve process results, reduce the air usage and to fit inside a tight area.

Full-Flow

Full-Flow Air Knife available from STOCK in lengths from 3″ – 36″, aluminum or 303SS construction

I recommended they use our 36″ Full-Flow Air Knife in the application. The Full-Flow Air Knife is our smallest profile offering at only 1″ x 1.03″ (aluminum construction) and uses a 30:1 amplification rate (entrained air to compressed air) to produce a high velocity, laminar curtain of air that travels the entire length of the knife. These units are in stock, ready to ship, offering the end user a low cost, quick solution to replace the existing drilled pipe.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

 

Vacuum Generators: Adjustable E-Vac Holds Parts To Work Station

I’ve written before about the diversity of applications that EXAIR’s compressed air products can be used for – the Super Air Knife and the Line Vac come to mind – but of all the products in our catalog, none have a longer list of applications than the E-Vac Vacuum Generators:

While they're probably most popular for "pick and place" (as evidenced by our catalog photos) the EXAIR E-Vac's boast a wide variety of uses.

While they’re probably most popular for “pick and place” (as evidenced by our catalog photos) the EXAIR E-Vac’s boast a wide variety of uses.

I had the pleasure of helping a customer specify a product another popular application recently: clamping and chucking.  This caller had a machining center with a vacuum table – if you’re unfamiliar, it looks like an air hockey table, and works like one too, only in reverse: instead of using blowing air through all those little holes out to “float” the puck on the surface, it pulls air in through them to pull the part down and hold it in place.

This was for a relatively small table surface…about 9″ x 14″…and some of the holes could be blocked, if smaller parts were to be held down.  It was originally equipped with an electrically driven vacuum pump, but it had seen better days, and a replacement was going to be a little pricey.  They already had compressed air running to the machine, and were keenly interested in something small, inexpensive, and with no moving parts – like the Adjustable E-Vac.

After some discussion of the specs on their vacuum pump, we provided a Model 840008M Adjustable E-Vac & Muffler.  This not only gives them the ability to easily change the vacuum level & flow for different sized parts, but it also has a larger throat than the In-Line E-Vacs, meaning it won’t get clogged by the finite amount of dust & small particulate that can make it through the vacuum table’s holes.

EXAIR has four sizes of Adjustable E-Vac Vacuum Generators in stock.

EXAIR has four sizes of Adjustable E-Vac Vacuum Generators in stock.

By my count, we’ve still got fourteen E-Vac applications that I haven’t discussed in a blog yet.  If you’ve got one that you’d like to talk about (and give me something to write about,) feel free to call me anytime.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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