Understanding your ROI for EXAIR Products

I used to hold a purchasing/engineering role for a previous company and as part of that role I was required to understand all costs of a project. The value of knowing the return of your investment is obvious but the benefit of this knowledge enhanced communications with other team members and at times with your customer. So how can I understand the economic impact from purchasing and Intelligent Compressed Air product from EXAIR?

EXAIR makes an easier job of calculating your ROI when purchasing our product(s). Simply go to www.EXAIR.com and click on “Resources”, located on the top center of our homepage. You will see “Calculator Library” where you can see our “Air Savings Calculator“.

Calculating your ROI using this tool is simple, simply place your current consumption rate (SCFM), the cost of our product(s), the SCFM for our product(s) and your cost of compressed air per 1000 Cubic feet (if this is unknown, $0.25/1000 cubic feet is a reasonable number to use).

  1. Current Consumption (SCFM): This is the current air requirements for your current process.
  2. Cost of EXAIR Product(s): This is the expenditure of the EXAIR product(s) being purchased.
  3. EXAIR Product(s) consumption (SCFM): This can be found in our catalog, web site or by calling EXAIR and talking to an Application Engineer.
  4. Cost of Compressed Air: This can be determined at your facility or a good industry average is $0.25/1000.

The calculator will automatically calculate your return and show you the payback in number of days. EXAIR encourages the use of our website and/or calling our Application Engineers for additional information or education on air savings. We are customer friendly and always eager to help.

Eric Kuhnash
Application Engineer
E-mail: EricKuhnash@exair.com
Twitter: Twitter: @EXAIR_EK

Quick Disconnects and Push In Fittings are not Ideal for Peak Performance

In order to achieve the best performance of your EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air® product, a steady flow of compressed air must be supplied at the optimal pressure. Compressor output pressure, air flow rate, piping ID (inner diameter), the smoothness of the inside of the pipe and connector type all contribute to the performance.

Especially for manufacturing uses, it is important to consider both the air pressure and air flow being produced by the air compressor providing the supply for all tooling. It is possible for an air compressor to produce sufficient supply pressure for an EXAIR product while not having adequate air flow to use the product for very long.

The optimal air pressure for most EXAIR products is 80 PSIG, with the exception of Vortex Tube based products, which are rated at 100 PSIG. Operating EXAIR products at air pressures less than 80 PSIG may lead to lower performance, but EXAIR encourages operating any blow-off product at as low a pressure as possible to achieve your desired result. A simple pressure regulator can lower your pressure and save energy. As a general rule near the 100 PSIG level, lowering air pressure by 2 PSIG will save 1% of energy used by an air compressor. Operating the product at pressures greater than 80 PSIG may produce slightly higher performance, but will require more energy to produce only a small gain.

Make sure that connectors and fittings do not restrict compressed air flow in any manner. Quick connectors can be especially problematic in this area. Because of their construction, quick connections that are rated at the same size as the incoming pipe or hose may actually have a much smaller inner diameter than that associated pipe or hose. This will significantly restrict the amount of air that is being supplied to the tool, starving it of the air flow it needs for best performance. In some cases, if the fitting is too small, the tool may not work at all!

EXAIR products are designed to improve the overall efficiency of your operations. If you need help and have questions please contact any of the Application Engineers. There is no risk to trying our products as we have a 5 year warranty and also a 30 Day Guarantee to all of our US and Canadian customers.

Eric Kuhnash
Application Engineer
E-mail: EricKuhnash@exair.com
Twitter: Twitter: @EXAIR_EK

Minimizing Hazards using the CDC’s Hierarchy of Controls

CDc Hierarchy of Controls

The management and effective control to reducing or eliminating workplace hazards can be frustrating. Controlling the exposure(s) to occupational hazards is the fundamental method of protecting employees. The CDC published a useful guide called “Hierarchy of Controls” detailing 5 types of control methods as a means to implement effective control solutions.

The idea behind this hierarchy is that the control methods at the top of graphic are potentially more effective and protective than those at the bottom. Following this hierarchy normally leads to the implementation of inherently safer systems, where the risk of illness or injury has been substantially reduced.

Elimination and substitution, while most effective at reducing workplace hazards, also tend to be the most difficult to implement in an existing process. If the process is still in a development stage, elimination and substitution of hazards may be inexpensive and simple to implement. For an existing process, major changes in equipment and procedures may be required to eliminate a hazard.

With 23 lbs of hard hitting force, this 1-1/4 NPT Super Air Nozzle is perfect for the most extreme blow off and cleaning jobs.

EXAIR can help your company follow the Hierarchy of Controls, to eliminate or reduce the hazards of compressed air usage. Many EXAIR products, including Super Air Knives and Air Amplifiers are simple to use for the substitution level of the hierarchy. The simplest substitution may be any of the EXAIR Air Nozzles and Jets, which have been designed to meet OSHA standards. All are safe to be supplied with higher pressure compressed air and meet OSHA standards 29 CFR 1910.242(b) and 29 CFR-1910.95(a).

Of course, when designing new systems, keep these products in mind and begin to design safer and more efficient compressed air demand elements of your machines and processes.

If you have questions or want to talk to an EXAIR Application Engineer please contact us to discuss how our products will be beneficial to your work environment safety.

Eric Kuhnash
Application Engineer
E-mail: EricKuhnash@exair.com
Twitter: Twitter: @EXAIR_EK

Full Flow Air Knife Creates “Smoke Screen” In Haunted House Attraction

EXAIR Corporation’s engineered Air Knife products have a number of uses in industry. The laminar, even flow is conducive to generating a stripping/sweeping action that is particularly effective for blowing off, cooling, cleaning, drying, etc. The way that they entrain enormous amounts of air from the surrounding environment makes them incredibly efficient. This entrainment also makes them very quiet, as it forms a boundary layer that attenuates the sound level of the high velocity flow of the compressed air exiting the Air Knife. These two features have a distinct benefit in a rather unique application in a decidedly non-industrial setting, though.

A company that services amusement parks & carnivals was making a “haunted house” type attraction. At one point, the victims visitors are to be surprised by animated figures “floating” in the air. Their idea was to project the animation on a wall/screen of smoke…spooky, right? They tried discharging the smoke through a series of holes, and even a thin slot, but could not get the effect they wanted, so they called EXAIR to talk about Air Knives.

Smoke escaping small holes or a thin slot doesn’t have much velocity, so it didn’t make a great ‘curtain’ for projection. It’s also turbulent in nature, so it tends to billow & plume (like the top graphic). Engineered compressed air products like EXAIR’s Air Knives generate a laminar flow (like the bottom graphic) whose velocity can be precisely controlled by regulating the air supply pressure.

They found their solution for this application in a Model 2836SS 36″ Stainless Steel Full Flow Air Knife Kit. The Full Flow Air Knife is the most compact design for any given length, and with rear ports for the compressed air supply, it was easy to conceal from the visitors’ sight. When smoke is introduced from behind, it gets pulled in (entrained), and discharges in a laminar, even curtain that the animated figures magically appear on. The extraordinarily low sound level contributes to the magic, as it can’t be heard over the din of eerie sound effects & music that are synonymous with the haunted house experience.

Compressed air flows through the inlet (1) to the Full Flow (left) or Standard (right) Air Knife, into the internal plenum. It then discharges through a thin gap (2), adhering to the Coanda profile (3) which directs it down the face of the Air Knife. The precision engineered & finished surfaces optimize entrainment of air (4) from the surrounding environment.

EXAIR Corporation has been in the business of providing quiet, safe, and efficient compressed air products for all kinds of applications for almost 39 years now. If you want to find out more about introducing more quietness, safety, efficiency…or magic…into your operation, give me a call.

Russ Bowman, CCASS

Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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