Super Air Amplifiers and Amplification Ratio

Super Air Amplifier Family

In the pneumatic industry, there are two types of Air Amplifiers.  One type will amplify the inlet air pressure to a higher compression.  The other type uses the inlet air pressure to amplify the air volume.  EXAIR manufactures the volume type called the Super Air Amplifiers™.

This change in air volume is called the amplification ratio.  So, what does this mean?  The definition of a ratio is the relation between two amounts showing the number of times one value is contained within the other.  For the Super Air Amplifier, it is the value that shows the amount of ambient air that is contained within the compressed air.  The higher the ratio, the more efficient the blowing device is.  With the EXAIR Super Air Amplifiers, we can reach amplification ratios up to 25 to 1.  This means that 25 parts of ambient “free” air is introduced for every 1 part of compressed air.

Air Amplifiers Are Great For blowing!

Why an EXAIR Super Air Amplifier?  Like a fan, they are designed to move air.  But fans use motors and blades to push the air toward the target.  The fan blades “slap” the air which creates turbulent air flows and loud noises. The Super Air Amplifiers do not use any blades or motors to move the air.  They just use a Coanda profile and a patented shim to create a low pressure to draw in the ambient air.  In physics, it is much easier to pull than it is to push.  The process of pulling air through the Super Air Amplifiers make them a more efficient, uniform, and quiet way to blow air.

Most people think that compressed air is free, but it is most certainly not.  Because of the amount of electricity required, compressed air is considered to be the fourth utility in manufacturing plants.  To save on utility costs, it is important to use compressed air as efficiently as possible.  In reference, the higher the amplification ratio, the more efficient the compressed air product.  Manufacturing plants that use open fittings, copper tubes, and drilled pipes for blowing are not properly using their compressed air system.  These types of products generally only have between a 2:1 to 5:1 amplification ratio.  The Super Air Amplifiers can reach a 25:1 ratio.

EXAIR manufactures and stocks five different sizes ranging from ¾” (19mm) up to 8” (203mm) in diameter.  Some of the benefits that the Super Air Amplifiers have is the inlet and outlet can be ducted for remote positioning.  They are very compact and can fit into tight places.  They do not have any moving parts to wear or need electricity to run.  They only need clean compressed air to operate; so, they are maintenance-free.

Another unique feature of the EXAIR Super Air Amplifier is the patented shim which optimizes the low-pressure to draw in more ambient air.   With extracting welding smoke, increasing cooling capacities, and moving material from point A to point B; the more air that can be moved, the better the performance.  And with the patented shim inside the EXAIR Super Air Amplifiers, it provides that.  As an added bonus, they are OSHA safe and meet the standards for noise level and dead-end pressure.

Super Air Amplifier Patented Shims

To explain things in every day terms; the amplification ratio can be represented by gas mileage.  Like your car, you want to get the most distance from a gallon of gasoline.  Similarly, with your compressed air system, you want to get the most for your pneumatic equipment.  An EXAIR Super Air Amplifier has a 25:1 amplification ratio.; so, in other words, you can get 25 mpg.  If you use drilled pipes, open fittings, copper tubes, etc. for blowing, then you are only getting 2 to 5 mpg.  If you want to get the most “distance” from your compressed air system, you should check the “gas mileage” of your blow-off components.  If you need assistance, an Application Engineer at EXAIR can help you to “tune up” your compressed air system.

John Ball
Application Engineer
Email: johnball@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_jb

People of Interest: Giovanni Battista Venturi March 15, 1746 – April 24, 1822

Giovanni Battista Venturi was born in 1746 to an affluent family in Reggio, Italy. An aspiring student, Giovanni was ordained as a priest and a professor by the age of 23. An avid historian of science at the University of Modena, he was the first to emphasize Leonardo da Vinci as a scientist rather than just an artist as he’s more commonly known. Despite his love for history, it wasn’t long before the University of Modena became aware of his talents in mathematics where they appointed him as professor of geometry and philosophy in 1774. During his tenure at the University of Modena, Giovanni was promoted to the Professor of Experimental Physics, served as the Duke of Modena as the State engineer and auditor, later serving diplomatic roles in both France and Switzerland.

Giovanni is most well-known for his work in developing what is now known as the venturi effect. In 1797, he published a study on the flow of water through short cylindrical tubes. It wasn’t until 1888 that Venturi’s design was applied to something practical when a man named Clemens Herschel received a patent for the first commercial venturi tube. The original purpose of the venturi tube was to measure the amount of water used in individual water mills and is still used to this day as a means of measuring fluid flows.

Venturi tube.jpg
Venturi Tube

The venturi effect is a principle in fluid dynamics and states that a fluid’s velocity must increase as it passes through a constricted pipe. As this occurs, the velocity increases while the static pressure decreases. The pressure drop that accompanies the increase in velocity is fundamental to the laws of physics. This is known as Bernoulli’s principle. Below is an illustration of how the venturi effect works inside of a constricted tube.

venturi

In everyday life, the venturi principle can be found inside of many small engines such as lawn mowers, gas powered scooters, motorcycles and older style automobiles. Inside the carburetor, there is a small tube through which filtered air flows from the intake. Inside of this tube is a short narrowing. When the air is forced to constrict, its velocity increases and creates a vacuum. This vacuum draws in fuel and mixes with the air stream causing it to atomize.  As the throttle valve is opened further, more fuel is forced into the engine. This increases the RPM and creates more power.

inlineworks
In-Line E-Vac

This principle is also applied to EXAIR’s line of E-Vac products to create vacuum. The .gif below illustrates how an In-Line E-vac works. (1) Compressed air flows through the inlet (2) and is directed through a nozzle, constricting the flow of air. (3) As the air stream exhausts, it expands causing a decrease in pressure and an increase in velocity prior to passing through the venturi. (4) A vacuum inlet tangential to the primary airflow is located at the suction point between the orifice and the venturi. (5) The airflow that is drawn through the vacuum inlet mixes with the primary airstream, then exhausts on the opposite end.

The venturi effect is used in a variety of other EXAIR products used for cooling, drying and cleaning, in addition to the vacuum generators. If you have a process in your facility that may benefit from an Intelligent Compressed Air solution, give us a call. We’d be happy to discuss your application and implement a solution to both reduce your compressed air costs and improve worker safety.

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

Photo: Venturi Tube with labels by ComputerGeezer an Geof.  GNU Free Documentation License

EXAIR E-Vac Vacuum Generator, How to Pick the Correct One

EXAIR’s compressed air powered E-Vac single stage vacuum generators are a low cost way create vacuum for many operations including- pick and place, clamping, chucking, alignment, lifting, and many others.

The E-Vac provide instantaneous response and are commonly used for pick and place operations.

EXAIR offers the In-Line and Adjustable style of E-Vacs. Both are compact and easy to mount at point of use. With 18 total models available, there is sure to be one that meets any application.  To determine when to use the Adjustable or the In-Line, see this Blog by Russ!

adjustablee-vacfamily
Adjustable E-Vac
In-LineE-VacFamily
In-Line E-Vac

 

 

 

 

 

 

The biggest factor and the first place to start is to determine if the part to be lifted is porous (Example, cardboard) or non-porous (Example, plastic sheet)

  • Porous materials require a low vacuum generator which produces a lower vacuum in exchange for higher vacuum flow which is capable of maintaining a good vacuum level through material that allows air to flow through itself.
  • Non-Porous materials are best suited to use the high vacuum generator which is capable of producing more powerful vacuum for the application.

If you want to see them both in action check this video out! 

E-Vac Video
Click the Video to Watch!

Both the Low Vacuum (for non-porous material) and High Vacuum (for porous material) E-Vacs come in 7 different sizes, ranging from light to very strong vacuum capabilities, to match any application. Special Kits are  available as a way to experiment with an assortment of vacuum cups to determine the best configuration.

e-vac-exair
EXAIR E-Vac Vacuum Generator

If you have questions about vacuum generation and the E-Vac or any of the 15 different EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air® Product lines, feel free to contact EXAIR and myself or any of our Application Engineers can help you determine the best solution.

Jordan Shouse
Application Engineer

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EXAIR Chip Trappers Make Short Work of Coolant Maintenance

“Build a better mousetrap, and the world will beat a path to your door,” words attributed to Ralph Waldo Emerson, means that even if there are established methods of doing something, an improved method will garner success.  It may or may not be true with mousetraps – there are over 4,400 U.S. patents for various designs. The tried-and-true spring loaded bar on a small wood plank seems to still be the most popular by far, however. Likely due to its simplicity, availability, and low cost.

There are also a good many machines on the market to clean & filter machine tool coolant.  Some are made to be permanent attachments to the coolant sump for continuous filtration.  Others are made for portability, and are used to pump out the sump, filter the coolant, and pump it back in.  These can be impressively comprehensive, and that’s often reflected in the knowledge required to operate them, as well as the price tag.

Like anything else, if you need all the “bells and whistles,” I’m sure those machines are worthy every penny.  If you just want clean coolant and you have a few minutes to spare every week or so, look no further than the EXAIR Chip Trapper System.  Here’s how it works:

  • Roll the Chip Trapper to your machine.
  • Pump the coolant out of your sump, stirring it with the pickup wand to get chips & debris sucked up with the coolant.
  • Pump the filtered coolant back in to your sump.
  • If you’ve got another machine tool, roll the Chip Trapper over to it, and repeat.  If not, you’re done.  Unless the Filter Bag’s full, in which case, you’ll want to empty it for the next time.

The vacuum hose (1) is attached to the barbed connection of the Chip Trapper (2). The directional flow control valve on the top of the drum (3) and knob on the pump (4) are set to the “fill” position. The air supply valve is opened to permit compressed air at 80-100 psig (5.5-6.9 BAR) to flow through the pump which pulls the liquid through the hose, then into the reusable filter bag (5). When all liquid is in the drum, the air supply is turned off. The filtered liquid can then be pumped out by setting the directional flow control valve on top of the drum and the knob on the pump to the “empty” position. Once the air supply valve is opened, the air pushes the liquid back through the hose while all solids remain in the reusable filter bag.

There’s no moving parts, and it’s compressed air operated, so there’s nothing to wear out or burn out.  If you keep on top of emptying and cleaning the Filter Bag, the Chip Trapper will operate darn near indefinitely, maintenance free.  Oh, and to explain why I started this blog with the quote I referenced, the folks at Design News Magazine thought it was so innovative, they gave it their “Golden Mousetrap” Award when we rolled them out.  Since then, we’ve incorporated three sizes for 30, 55, and 110 gallon drums.  We also developed a High Lift version that generates 180″ H2O suction lift, for when the standard Chip Trapper‘s 96″ H2O lift isn’t enough.

EXAIR Corporation has a long history of making compressed air products that help a wide variety of industries get the most out of their processes, and the Chip Trapper is one of the most visible, and successful, examples of that.  If you’d like to find out more, give me a call.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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