Henri Coanda: Founder of The Coanda Effect (1886-1972)

EXAIR uses the Coanda effect in many of our products. Henri Coanda is an important figure in the world of fluid dynamics and aerodynamics.

Henri Coanda was a prominent Romanian Inventor and aerodynamics pioneer is known for the creation of the Coanda-1910 experimental plane as well as discovering the Coanda effect. On June 7, 1886 Henri was born in Bucharest Romania to General Constantin Coanda and Aida Danet. In 1899 Henri’s father who desired him to have a military career had him transfer to a Military High School for additional years of schooling, where he graduated with the rank of Sergeant Major. Continuing his studies, he went on to technical school back in Bucharest for Artillery, Military, and Naval Engineering. In 1904 he was sent to an artillery regiment in Germany where he would enroll in Technische Hochshule. Henri did not give up on studying and in 1907 went to Montefiore Institute in Liege, Belgium, where he met Gianni Caproni.

In 1910 Henri and Gianni began a partnership to construct an experimental aircraft which was later called the Coanda-1910. The Coanda-1910 was unlike any other aircraft of its time as it had no propeller; instead it sported an oddly shaped front end with built-in rotary blades arranged in a swirl pattern. These blades were driven by an internal turbine screw that would suck air in through the turbine while exhausting the gases out of the rear, propelling the plane forward. This initial jet engine was quite impressive for the time, but sadly nobody believed it would ever fly and is believed that it never did achieve flight. Coanda is not credited with the invention of the jet engine, but his technology spurred the future of aviation into the future.

During World War 2 Henri spent his time developing the turbo-propeller drive system from his 1910 Biplane. After World War 2 had ended Henri began furthering his research on the Coanda Effect which would become the basis for several investigations into entrained and augmented flow of fluids. Later on in 1969 Henri would spend the last of his days in Romania serving as Director of the Institute for Scientific and Technical Creation. Coanda died on November 25, 1972 in his home town of Bucharest.

Here at EXAIR we have taken Henri Coanda’s, Coanda Effect and applied it to a number of our products to help amplify total airflow and save on compressed air.  The most notable product lines are our Air Amplifiers, Air Nozzles, and Air Knives – which are some of the most efficient products of their kind. These products can help lower your compressed air demand. 

If you have any questions about compressed air systems or want more information on any of EXAIR’s products, give us a call, we have a team of Application Engineers ready to answer your questions and recommend a solution for your applications.

Cody Biehle
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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Usefulness of a Coanda Profile

How did a past inventor help generate efficient compressed air products for EXAIR?  In the early 20th century, Henri Coanda who was a Romanian aeronautical engineer that built an experimental Coanda-1910 airplane.  There are some debates if the airplane actually flew, but he invented a curved surface for a wing to generate a Coanda effect. The Coanda effect is the “tendency of a fluid jet to stay attached to a convex surface”1.   Thus, a moving stream of fluid will follow the curvature of the surface rather than continuing to travel in a straight line.  The Wright Brothers who flew the first airplane in the state where EXAIR is located, Ohio, used the Coanda effect to create lift.  With a curved profile, the air will adhere to the surface, causing a low pressure which makes the airplane fly.

Standard Air Knife

Super Air Amplifier with shims

EXAIR uses this Coanda profile to make some of our Intelligent Compressed Air Products™.   Like the airplane wing, our curved surface will also create a low pressure.  How does this help?  Well, high pressure will always travel to low pressure.  Instead of lift, we use the low air pressure to entrain ambient air.  This ratio is what we call the amplification ratio.  The higher the amplification ratio, the higher the efficiency for a blowing device. Two main compressed air products that EXAIR manufactures use this type of profile; Air Knives and Air Amplifiers.  I will cover both below.

Compressed air flows through the inlet (1) to the Standard Air Knife, into the internal plenum. It then discharges through a thin gap (2), adhering to the Coanda profile (3) which directs it down the face of the Air Knife. The precision engineered & finished surfaces optimize entrainment of air (4) from the surrounding environment.

The Air Knives that use the Coanda profile blows air along the length of the knife at a 90o angle from the exit.  We offer two types; the Standard Air Knife and the Full Flow Air Knife.  The Standard Air Knives are made in Aluminum or Stainless Steel with blowing widths up to 48” (1219mm).  The inlet ports are at each end; so, the overall length is 1” (25mm) longer.  The Full Flow Air Knives have the port or ports on the back.  The air blows out the entire length of the air knife.  The maximum length is 36” (914mm).

Both types of air knives use the Coanda profile to generate a low pressure as the air exits the gap and “hugs” the curve (reference photo above).  This low pressure draws ambient air into the air stream at a 30:1 amplification ratio for both the Standard Air Knife and Full Flow Air Knife.  So, for every one part of compressed air, we entrain 30 parts of ambient air.  Besides efficiency, it also adds mass to the air stream for a hard-hitting force.  With this engineered profile, the air stream is laminar which gives a consistent force across the entire length and reduces noise levels.  Not only will they save you money,  but they are also OSHA safe.

Air Amplifiers use the Coanda Effect to generate high flow with low consumption.

The Air Amplifiers use the Coanda profile in a circular form to pull in dramatic amounts of free surrounding air.  The Coanda effect is able to generate a low pressure to blow air for cooling, cleaning or removing smoke and debris efficiently and quietly.  The Air Knives above blow a flat stream of air while the Air Amplifiers will blow a conical air stream.  They can reach amplification ratios up to 25:1. The Super Air Amplifiers use a patented shim to increase efficiency.

Unlike fans, they blow a laminar air stream for quick cooling.  They do not have any moving parts or motors to wear, so they are very quiet.  EXAIR manufactures five different sizes from ¾” (19mm) to 8” (203mm).  The Adjustable Air Amplifiers have a plug that can be adjusted to control the blowing force from a breeze to a blast.  For cleaning surfaces, this is a nice feature to “dial” in to exactly what you need.  We also manufacture five different sizes in aluminum and stainless steel ranging from ¾” (19mm) to 4” (102mm).  Both Air Amplifiers can be attached to ducts to remove debris, heat or smoke from the area.

Utilizing the Coanda effect allows for massive compressed air savings. Whether it is a flat or round air stream, EXAIR can do this with high amplification ratios.  If you would like to discuss further how our Air Knives or Air Amplifiers can help you in your applications, please contact us. An Application Engineer will be happy to help you.  History has shown us a way to increase efficiency when using compressed air.  And you can take advantage of it with the Coanda profile.  Thank you Mr. Henri Coanda.

John Ball
Application Engineer
Email: johnball@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_jb

 

1note – Wikipedia – Coanda effect

The Bernoulli Principle

When catapults would hurl stones and projectiles at castles there weren’t thinking of how the stones flew or what could make them fly better, often they went with the “Tim Taylor method” of MORE POWER.  It wasn’t until thousands of years later that mathematicians started to talk about gases and liquids and how they react to different scenarios. Things like how does air react to a stone being launched through it. Johann Bernoulli played a significant role and calculated a lot of this out throughout his life and discovered what is now called the Bernoulli Principle.

Bernoulli discovered that when there is an increase in the speed of a fluid, a simultaneous decrease in fluid pressure occurs at the same time. This is what explains how a plane’s wing shape matters. It also can showcase how a curveball coming into the strike zone can fall out and cause an outlandish “STTTeeerriike Three” from the umpire. It is also sometimes confused with the Coandă effect. While both effects have a tremendous impact on our modern lives, the best way I have learned these effects is through videos such as the one below.

As mentioned within the video, there are numerous effects that can closely relate to the Bernoulli effect, the best example I see is the curveball which when implemented correctly can cause a very upset batter, while the pitcher has the game of his or her career.

If you would like to talk about some scientific discoveries that have you puzzled, or if you want to figure out how we can use one of these effects to help your application, contact us.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

 

Video Source: Fizzics Organization – 10/8/2014 – retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-c_oCKm5FLU&list=PLLKB_7Zd6leNJmORn6HHcF78o2ucquf0U

EXAIR Standard Air Knife: Engineered For Performance

In 1983, EXAIR Corporation was founded with the goal of engineering & manufacturing quiet, safe, and efficient compressed air products for industry.  By 1988, the EXAIR-Knife (now known as the Standard Air Knife) was quickly becoming the preferred choice for replacing loud and inefficient drilled pipes, long nozzle manifolds…anywhere an even, high velocity curtain of air was required.

The EXAIR Standard Air Knife’s design takes advantage of a fascinating principle of fluidics to achieve quiet and efficient operation: the Coanda Effect, which is the tendency of a fluid jet to stay attached to a convex surface.  If you want to see it for yourself, hold the back of a spoon, handle up, under the kitchen faucet.  Those who haven’t seen it before may assume that gravity will take over and the water will fall from the bottom of the spoon’s ‘bowl’ – but it doesn’t:

Likewise, the air flow (which is just another example of a fluid jet) exiting the Standard Air Knife’s shim gap follows a convex surface (which we call the “Coanda profile”) causing it to entrain large amounts of air from the surrounding environment:

Compressed air flows through the inlet (1) to the Standard Air Knife, into the internal plenum. It then discharges through a thin gap (2), adhering to the Coanda profile (3) which directs it down the face of the Air Knife. The precision engineered & finished surfaces optimize entrainment of air (4) from the surrounding environment.

This entrainment does two things for us:

  • First, because we’ve engineered the design for maximum entrainment, it’s very efficient – creating a high flow rate, while minimizing air consumption.  In the case of the Standard Air Knife, the entrainment ratio is 30:1.
  • Secondly, this entrainment forms an attenuating boundary layer for the air flow, resulting in a high velocity, high volume airflow that is also incredibly quiet.

The EXAIR Standard Air Knife comes in lengths from 3″ to 48″, and in aluminum or 303SS construction.  All sizes, in both materials, are on the shelf and available for immediate shipment.  For most applications, we recommend the Kit, which includes a Shim Set (to make gross changes to flow & force,) an Automatic Drain Filter Separator (keeps the air clean & moisture free,) and a Pressure Regulator (to dial in the performance.)  Deluxe Kits add our Universal Air Knife Mounting System and EFC Electronic Flow Control.

(From left to right) Aluminum Standard Air Knife Kit, SS Standard Air Knife Kit, Deluxe Aluminum Standard Air Knife Kit, Deluxe SS Standard Air Knife Kit.

If you need a hard hitting curtain of air for blow off, drying, cleaning, cooling, environmental separation, etc., the EXAIR Standard Air Knife is an easy and economical solution.  If you’d like to discuss your application and/or product selection, give me a call.

Russ Bowman

Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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