Quick Disconnects and Push In Fittings are not Ideal for Peak Performance

In order to achieve the best performance of your EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air® product, a steady flow of compressed air must be supplied at the optimal pressure. Compressor output pressure, air flow rate, piping ID (inner diameter), the smoothness of the inside of the pipe and connector type all contribute to the performance.

Especially for manufacturing uses, it is important to consider both the air pressure and air flow being produced by the air compressor providing the supply for all tooling. It is possible for an air compressor to produce sufficient supply pressure for an EXAIR product while not having adequate air flow to use the product for very long.

The optimal air pressure for most EXAIR products is 80 PSIG, with the exception of Vortex Tube based products, which are rated at 100 PSIG. Operating EXAIR products at air pressures less than 80 PSIG may lead to lower performance, but EXAIR encourages operating any blow-off product at as low a pressure as possible to achieve your desired result. A simple pressure regulator can lower your pressure and save energy. As a general rule near the 100 PSIG level, lowering air pressure by 2 PSIG will save 1% of energy used by an air compressor. Operating the product at pressures greater than 80 PSIG may produce slightly higher performance, but will require more energy to produce only a small gain.

Make sure that connectors and fittings do not restrict compressed air flow in any manner. Quick connectors can be especially problematic in this area. Because of their construction, quick connections that are rated at the same size as the incoming pipe or hose may actually have a much smaller inner diameter than that associated pipe or hose. This will significantly restrict the amount of air that is being supplied to the tool, starving it of the air flow it needs for best performance. In some cases, if the fitting is too small, the tool may not work at all!

EXAIR products are designed to improve the overall efficiency of your operations. If you need help and have questions please contact any of the Application Engineers. There is no risk to trying our products as we have a 5 year warranty and also a 30 Day Guarantee to all of our US and Canadian customers.

Eric Kuhnash
Application Engineer
E-mail: EricKuhnash@exair.com
Twitter: Twitter: @EXAIR_EK

EXAIR Commitment to Standards and Certifications

EXAIR has a history of being a leader in the design, manufacture, quality and safety consciousness of compressed air products within the industrial marketplace. Our design engineers have a focus to ensure our products are engineered to provide optimal performance while maintaining safety and effectiveness. Our Intelligent Compressed Air Products are engineered for safety while also meeting a wide range of standards and certifications.

Air can be dangerous when the outlet pressure of a hole, hose or copper tube is higher than 30 PSIG (2 BAR. All products manufactured by EXAIR have been designed for safety and meet or exceed the OSHA Standard 29 CFR – 1910.242(b) which relates to harmful dead-end pressure.

Noise levels in manufacturing environments also pose a safety risk as compressed air noise often exceeds OSHA noise levels standards used to prevent hearing loss. EXAIR products reduce noise levels to meet or exceed OSHA Standard 29 CFR – 1910.92(a) Maximum Allowable Noise Exposure.

CE marking indicates conformity with health, safety, and environmental protection standards for products sold within the European Economic Area.  Unlike OSHA standards, responsibility for CE marking falls solely with the seller of the product. A CE marked product has been tested and certified in a way to meet safety & quality benchmarks specified for that type of product.  All EXAIR products that are defined under applicable directives have been tested according to these standards, and carry the CE mark.

The Restriction of Hazardous Substances Directive, or RoHS, is another standard borne from the European Union, and is geared towards public & workplace safety by restricting the use of hazardous materials in the manufacture of electronic & electrical equipment.  Since its inception in 2006, similar standards have been vigorously adopted around the globe.  Electrical portions of EXAIR’s Static Eliminators, EFC Electronic Flow Controls, ETC Electronic Temperature Controls, Digital Flowmeters, Solenoid Valves, and Thermostats all comply with the RoHS Directive.

Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act doesn’t address a concern for product users, but rather a particularly troubling human rights issue – Conflict Minerals.  For almost two decades, trade in tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) has been used by some bad people to finance violent campaigns against their neighbors.  EXAIR thoroughly and systematically documents our supply chain compliance with this act.  We are proudly committed to our support for this effort to help the world be a better place for everyone…especially those in desperate circumstances beyond their control.

EXAIR manufactures Intelligent Compressed Air Products with safety and performance in mind. If you have questions, need a catalog or assistance selecting the best product for your application please contact any of our application engineers.

Eric Kuhnash
Application Engineer
E-mail: EricKuhnash@exair.com
Twitter: Twitter: @EXAIR_EK

Minimizing Hazards using the CDC’s Hierarchy of Controls

CDc Hierarchy of Controls

The management and effective control to reducing or eliminating workplace hazards can be frustrating. Controlling the exposure(s) to occupational hazards is the fundamental method of protecting employees. The CDC published a useful guide called “Hierarchy of Controls” detailing 5 types of control methods as a means to implement effective control solutions.

The idea behind this hierarchy is that the control methods at the top of graphic are potentially more effective and protective than those at the bottom. Following this hierarchy normally leads to the implementation of inherently safer systems, where the risk of illness or injury has been substantially reduced.

Elimination and substitution, while most effective at reducing workplace hazards, also tend to be the most difficult to implement in an existing process. If the process is still in a development stage, elimination and substitution of hazards may be inexpensive and simple to implement. For an existing process, major changes in equipment and procedures may be required to eliminate a hazard.

With 23 lbs of hard hitting force, this 1-1/4 NPT Super Air Nozzle is perfect for the most extreme blow off and cleaning jobs.

EXAIR can help your company follow the Hierarchy of Controls, to eliminate or reduce the hazards of compressed air usage. Many EXAIR products, including Super Air Knives and Air Amplifiers are simple to use for the substitution level of the hierarchy. The simplest substitution may be any of the EXAIR Air Nozzles and Jets, which have been designed to meet OSHA standards. All are safe to be supplied with higher pressure compressed air and meet OSHA standards 29 CFR 1910.242(b) and 29 CFR-1910.95(a).

Of course, when designing new systems, keep these products in mind and begin to design safer and more efficient compressed air demand elements of your machines and processes.

If you have questions or want to talk to an EXAIR Application Engineer please contact us to discuss how our products will be beneficial to your work environment safety.

Eric Kuhnash
Application Engineer
E-mail: EricKuhnash@exair.com
Twitter: Twitter: @EXAIR_EK

Henri Coanda and his Effect on Compressed Air

Henri defined the Coanda Effect – the tendency of a jet of fluid emerging from an orifice to follow an adjacent flat or curved surface and to entrain fluid from the surroundings so that a region of lower pressure develops.

Compressed air flows through the inlet (1) to the Full Flow (left) or Standard (right) Air Knife, into the internal plenum. It then discharges through a thin gap (2), adhering to the Coanda profile (3) which directs it down the face of the Air Knife. The precision engineered & finished surfaces optimize entrainment of air (4) from the surrounding environment.

Henri-Marie Coanda (1885-1972) discovered the Coanda Effect in1930. He observed that a stream of air (fluid) emerging from a nozzle tends to follow a nearby curved surface, if the curvature of the surface or angle the surface makes with the stream is not too sharp. For example, if a stream of fluid is flowing along a solid surface which is curved slightly from the stream, the fluid will tend to follow the surface.

A number EXAIR products are designed to utilize the Coanda Effect and aid their performance. In some products, the Coanda Effect aids to create an amplification area where additional ambient air is drawn into the total airflow to increase total volume of air upon a target. This creates a more efficient and effective product. Also, since not as much compressed air is required, the noise levels decrease for products like EXAIR’s air knives, air nozzles, air jets and air amplifiers. EXAIR has been successful with positive impact for compressed air energy savings and noise reductions helping us meet or exceed OSHA Standard 29 CFR-1910.95 9(a) Maximum Allowable Noise Exposure.

Please contact EXAIR with regards to our Intelligent Compressed Air Products. We can help you with your next cooling, blow-off, drying or any compressed air needs.

Eric Kuhnash
Application Engineer
Email: erickuhnash@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_EK

1- Spoon Coanda image- https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/deed.en