Gen4 Super Ion Air Knife Reduces Shocks and Jamming in Converting Application

When an atom gains or loses an electron from its outer shell, it becomes electrically imbalanced. A material’s propensity to either gain or lose an electron is “ranked” on a list known as the Triboelectric Series.

The buildup of static electricity is a common issue for many converting applications. This type of static generation is known as detachment static build up. Detachment static build up occurs when a material is in contact with another and these two surfaces separate from one another. During the separation, not all of the electrons are able to get back to their original molecule. This results in an instantaneous static charge as the electrons are transferred from one object to another in accordance with the Triboelectric Series. Due to the large surface area in most detachment static buildup scenarios, the amount of static generated is typically far greater than contact static buildup. Detachment static buildup occurs on many converting applications as material separates from a bulk roll.

This typically occurs at a high rate of speed and the large surface area across the width of the roll presents an ideal situation for static buildup. This charge can cause the material to stick to itself and not come off the roll properly, creating issues down the line. It can also result in painful shocks to operators, which not only presents a safety hazard but also negatively impacts productivity and morale.

I recently worked with a customer that was experiencing some issues with their converting process for a line of candy packaging. The high static charge was discharging to their operators along while periodically causing the machine to jam up and need to be stopped, cut, and re-fed. Using the Model 7905 Static Meter, they were measuring charges of over 31 kV on the material.

The solution was to install a Model 112024 Super Ion Air Knife above and below the web to saturate the material with positive and negative ions. The knife carries the ions to the surface of the material and ensures the charge is neutralized immediately upon contact. After implementing a knife above and below the material, the charge was neutralized and also stopped the nuisance shocks experienced by operators nearby.

Each time the machine jammed it would take approximately 30 minutes to fix. This issue was occurring anywhere from 3-4x per day and the machine ran 24/7. By simply implementing the Super Ion Air Knives they gained up to 2hrs more run time by eliminating the presence of static in the process.

Don’t let static continue to create headaches for your personnel. Get yourself a permanent solution from EXAIR and ensure your processes run smoothly.

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@EXAIR.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

EXAIR’s Gen4 Ionizing Point: Compact Static Neutralization

Static electricity will be more prevalent under certain environmental conditions like low humidity. It will also appear on applications which have friction, separation, or insulating materials. Luckily, EXAIR has a wide-range of Static Eliminators that are designed specifically to address static issues in a wide variety of industries and conditions. Materials such as paper, plastic, or textiles will normally contain an equal number of both positive and negative ions. When subjected to friction, this balance can be disturbed if the atoms gain or lose an electron.

The static charge will then exert a force on nearby charged objects or grounded conductors (including personnel). These issues can also manifest in the form of dust clinging to product, product clinging to itself, rollers, machine beds or frames, materials jamming, and sheet feeding problems. Our Gen4 Static Eliminators have undergone independent laboratory tests to certify that they meet the rigorous safety, health, and environmental standards of the USA, European Union and Canada that are required to attain the CE and UL marks.

EXAIR manufactures two products in our Static Eliminator line that do not require any compressed air to operate, the Ionizing Point and the Ionizing Bar. Our Gen4 Ionizing Point is a compact, single point ionizer ideal for a range of winding, rewinding, or slitting operations. It can also be mounted through a duct to neutralize static charges due to moving air or materials.

The shockless Gen4 Ionizing Point delivers a high concentration of positive and negative ions for rapid static decay. It is capable of neutralizing static on the surface of your part or material within 2”. In this image below, a series of Gen4 Ionizing Points are being used to neutralize static from a playing card slitting operation.

The Ionizing Point is just one of our many Static Eliminators available from stock. If you’re experiencing static in any of your applications or processes, EXAIR has a solution available ready to ship. Give us a call and we’ll be happy to help point you in the right direction.

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@EXAIR.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

 

Eliminate Static on Hose, Tube, and Extruded Shapes w/ EXAIR’s Gen4 Super Ion Air Wipe!

Gen4 Super Ion Air Wipe

This time of the year it is not uncommon to feel a slight shock after walking across a carpeted surface and touching a door knob. This little “jolt” is a result of fast-moving electrons leaping from your body to the door knob, or vice versa. As your feet shuffle across the surface of a rug or carpet, your body will either gain or lose electrons. Touching a conductive surface then causes these electrons to leap from one place to another.

When an atom gains or loses an electron, it affects the balance that occurs within an atom. If an atom gains an electron, it now has more electrons than protons. This results in a negatively charged atom. The opposite can be said if an atom loses an electron, it now carries a positive charge. This charge imbalance is where static electricity comes from. Both positive and negative charges will remain static until contacted by or in close proximity to a conductive or grounded surface.

Static can be a problem in many industries contributing to a range of different process problems. Common problems include: dust clinging to product, product clinging to itself, rollers, machine beds or frames, materials jamming or curling, sheet feeding problems, and hazardous sparks or shocks to operators.

For eliminating static on the surface of pipe, cable, extruded shapes, hose, or wire, look no further than EXAIR’s Gen4 Super Ion Air Wipe. The Gen4 Super Ion Air Wipe provides a uniform 360° ionized airstream and is available in both 2” and 4” ID sizes. Its clam-shell design makes it easy to clamp around a part for neutralizing static electricity and contaminants.

The high volume, high velocity airflow attaches itself to the surface and wipes it down with static eliminating ions. The airflow stays attached to the surface and is effective up to 15’ away from where it’s mounted. It’s lightweight and easy to mount using the ¼-20 tapped holes on the back or can also be held into place with just rigid pipe.

If you’d like to talk about how EXAIR can help solve the static problems in your facility, give us a call. With a wide range of Static Eliminators available to ship same day from stock you can consider these problems a thing of the past!

Tyler Daniel, Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@EXAIR.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

Ion Air Cannon Keeps Paper Recycling Baler Working

One of the cruelest pranks I’ve ever been party to happened during my time in the United States Navy. All it took was:

  • A cigar box
  • A rubber band
  • The scrap “dots” from every 3-hole punch we could find

We cut the lid off the cigar box, filled it with the “dots,” used the lid and the rubber band to make a wind-up flapper that we stretched across the open top of the box, and carefully placed it in our Leading Petty Officer’s (LPO’s) desk drawer.  Then we waited for hilarity to ensue the next time he opened that drawer.

Unbeknownst to us, he was going to a pretty important meeting that morning, so he was wearing his Service Dress Blues (also known as “crackerjacks” – the dark wool one; not the white one on the popular snack mix box).  When he opened his desk drawer, the rubber band-powered flapper flung those little white paper dots all over him.  It was wintertime, in an office space with electric baseboard heat, so the static cling was heinous.  It took several of us with makeshift lint brushes fashioned from duct tape to get his uniform “shipshape” and presentable for the meeting.

I was reminded of this incident recently when I had the pleasure of helping a caller from a paper recycling plant, who was having a static problem in a baler, with, basically, large confetti-like pieces of shredded paper.  These shreds are pneumatically conveyed through a long 8-inch duct, where they picked up enough static to cling to the inside of the baler chute, and built up to a point where they covered the sensors that opened the chute.  This caused the chute doors to cycle without the chute being full, which triggered the baler to activate with nothing there.  The result from the operators was a lot of slamming, frustration, and cursing…which further reminded me of my LPO’s reaction to getting covered in paper dots.

While lint brushes (and duct tape, in a pinch) work just fine for removing statically charged debris from one’s clothing, the baler required a different solution…in the form of a pair of EXAIR Gen4 Ion Air Cannons.  These were installed to blow into the baler, from opposite walls just above the chute, and aimed slightly down towards the sensors.  This keeps the sensors clear until paper shred actually DOES fill the chute, allowing it to dump a whole bale’s worth of scrap, keeping the baler (and the operators) happy.

Whatever you needs, EXAIR has a Gen4 Static Eliminator product to solve your static problem.

Many industrial static charge problems have similarities to “real world” experiences that most of us are familiar with.  If you want to talk about static control, give me a call.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
Visit us on the Web
Follow me on Twitter
Like us on Facebook