The Negative Effect of Hot Ambient Conditions on Traditional A/C Refrigerant Panel Coolers vs EXAIR Cabinet Coolers

EXAIR’s High Temp Cabinet Cooler Systems

As summer endures and temperatures continue to rise panel conditioning units can start to struggle to keep your electronics cool.  An agricultural company contacted EXAIR as they were having some issues with their air conditioning panel cooler.  The increase in outside temperatures caused the air conditioning systems to underperform.  The electronics were overheating and shutting down production.  They needed a better way to keep the internal circuits cool during the hotter months of summer. 

They sent in the information on the A/C panel that they were using (reference photo below).  I circled the important factors that we would need.  EXAIR is familiar with these tags as we helped many customers to find a more reliable way to keep their electronics cool.  This customer stated that they had already replaced three units in the past 10 years.  The one above has been in operation for only 3 months, and they were still worried about failure.  It could be due to lack of maintenance, dirty environment, or high ambient temperatures, but the short life of the refrigeration units was a major concern. 

From the placard, the total cooling capacity was DIN EN 14511 L35 L35 0.38KW as circled above.   The DIN EN 14511 is a European Standard that rates the performance of air conditioning units.  The first L35 is the temperature rating for inside the panel, 35oC.  The second L35 is the ambient temperature, 35oC.  The cooling capacity at those temperature conditions is 0.38KW, or 1,296 BTU/hr.  As you can see, the performance was measured with the ambient temperature at 35oC (95oF).  If the ambient temperature goes above this standard rating, the cooling capacity of the air conditioning unit will start to decrease.  With the EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Systems, we use the internal temperature as 35oC (95oF) as well, but our external temperature can be as high as 93oC (200oF).  Here is a diagram showing the range of the different types of cooling devices as compared to the ambient temperatures and the environment.

Another note on the placard is the IP Code – IP54; and “Maintains the environmental integrity of type 12”.  EXAIR offers three different NEMA ratings to keep the integrity of your panel.  We offer NEMA 12, NEMA 4 and NEMA 4X.  The rated voltage for the A/C panel cooler is 115 V / 60 Hz / 1-.  EXAIR offers three different voltages with our solenoid valves to work in conjunction with our thermostats.  We have 240Vac, 115Vac, and 24Vdc.  So, from the information supplied by the A/C panel cooler, we are getting close for a recommendation.  What do we need next?  The ambient temperature condition which affected the A/C panel cooler.  I need this information to calculate the heat load on the hottest day of the hottest month. 

In the Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide that we sent to them; they marked the “Maximum external temperature possible” at 130oF (54.4oC).  As seen in the chart below, this is the upper limit for the performance conditions for an A/C unit.  With the EXAIR Cabinet Cooler System, we can offer a High Temperature Cabinet Cooler that can work up to 200oF (93oC).  And, they will still operate under the harshest of environments.  With the size of their panel, the external heat load was calculated at 980 BTU/hr.  Remember, since we are replacing the A/C panel cooler with an EXAIR Cabinet Cooler System, we will need to add the 0.38KW or 1,296 BTU/hr to the external heat load.  The total heat load is measured at 980 BTU/hr + 1,296 BTU/hr = 2,276 BTU/hr

Since we now have all the information, I recommended a model HT4340 Cabinet Cooler System.  This system has a NEMA 12 Cabinet Cooler, a filter, a cold air distribution kit, a thermostat, and a 115Vac solenoid valve.  The cooling capacity for the HT4340 is 2.800 BTU/hr; above the required 2,276 BTU/hr maximum heat load.  So, when the internal temperature reaches 95oF (35oC), the thermostat will turn the solenoid off to save compressed air.  This Cabinet Cooler System fit the criteria as noted on the placard on the A/C unit for replacement. 

HT4340 Cabinet Cooler System

With they received the model HT4340, they were amazed at how small and compact the unit was.  The Cabinet Cooler does not have any moving parts, Freon, or condensers to clean.  They only need clean compressed air.  The installation was also very simple.  It took them longer to remove the A/C unit than to install the EXAIR Cabinet Cooler.  They were able to start using the Cabinet Cooler in less than one hour.  They also commented to me about how they wished that they knew about the Cabinet Cooler Systems 10 years ago.  The breakdowns, the replacements, the maintenance, and the headaches that the A/C units delivered cost them much money in material and production shutdowns. 

If you have electrical panels over-heating or air conditioning units under-performing, you should try an EXAIR Cabinet Cooler System.  You can fill out the Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide and an Application Engineer will find the best model to keep your operations running; even during the summer months. 

John Ball
Application Engineer
Email: johnball@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_jb

EXAIR’s Super Air Knife Replaces Blower-Driven Slotted Pipe

EXAIR’s Super Air Knives are the ideal fit for any application requiring a laminar “curtain” of air for blowoff purposes. The high-velocity airflow does an excellent job of cleaning off surfaces, cooling, and drying in a wide variety of applications throughout industry. These products are engineered to provide a consistent and reliable force across the full length of the knife, ensuring repeatable performance in any application.

I recently worked with a customer who manufactures a variety of bread products. In one application, they were using slotted pipes connected to a blower to clean sesame seeds off of trays after baking. The cut pipes seemed like a simple and economical solution since they had the materials there in the facility already, but the homemade blower-knives were lacking in force necessary to clean the trays.

Slotted pipes operating off of a blower didn’t quite pack the “punch” necessary to clean the trays.

When the tray wasn’t fully cleaned, residual seeds would stick to the bottom of the next loaves and burn leaving an unacceptable product for their customers. The solution was to implement a manual step of scraping off the trays which required a dedicated operator to perform this single operation. The plant runs 24/7, leading the customer to hire 3 new personnel strictly for cleaning the trays all day long.

Recent staffing difficulties due to COVID-19 led management to seek out areas where they could enhance their production efficiency and identified an opportunity in this application. EXAIR’s compressed air operated Super Air Knives provide a hard-hitting curtain of air that is very effective at cleaning. The (2) slotted pipes were replaced with (2) Model 110024SS stainless steel Super Air Knives and plumbed into their existing compressed air system.

Immediately, the higher force provided by the Super Air Knives displayed the ability to completely clean the trays and eliminate the need for dedicated operators for this part of the process. This allowed them to shift personnel to areas in the facility in desperate need of help, while still solving the problem of rejected bread loaves due to residual seeds.

If you have an application in your facility that is in need of an efficiency makeover, give us a call. Our team of experienced Application Engineers is ready to help evaluate your process and make any necessary recommendations.

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@EXAIR.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

Utilizing CAD Files

When I was in 6th grade, our art teacher, Mrs. C, taught us to draw fruit one day. I was academically gifted (I’d had straight A’s since 1st grade) but I was AWFUL at drawing. I was doing OK with my orange, apple, and even my banana. When it came time to draw a pear, I realized I had 35 cents in my pocket (that’s what milk for snack time cost) so I pulled out that quarter & dime, used them to trace a quarter-sized circle with a dime-size circle slightly intersecting it, erased the middle parts, and “free-handed” little arcs to complete the pear shape. Mrs. C told me I wasn’t allowed to do that and gave me my first bad grade – ever. Now, I LOVE going to art museums and taking in the wonders of those who are far more skilled than I with pen and brush, but I STILL have no aptitude or desire for drawing anything myself….with a pen or brush, that is.

My first job out of the Navy involved some very basic CAD use…mainly making simple changes or additions (and usually just title block text) of existing drawings. As I more familiar with CAD, I realized the method for drawing a pear shape in CAD was, in fact, my own personal grade school method: intersect two circles, trim, and fillet. So there, Mrs. C!

My next job took my CAD utilization a bit further…making assembly drawings of systems, using existing CAD files for the individual components that made up the system. The key word there was “existing” – the First Law of CAD is, “Don’t ever draw anything twice.” So, I’d get CAD files from the manufacturers, insert them into my template, put them where I wanted them to be in relation to the other pieces of my little puzzle, send the drawing(s) to the end user for piping and foundation prep, and as long as the folks in the shop followed my drawings (which is was hard not to), everything worked out great.

Now, this was way back in the 1990’s, so I got most of my CAD files via email, and, occasionally, on 3.5″ floppy disks or CD’s. EXAIR Corporation has offered drawing files for our products in our CAD Library for many years now. You can always find four fundamental file extensions:

  • PDF – these can be opened with Adobe Acrobat…they’re “just for looking at”. They don’t denote any particular scale, and won’t directly import to a CAD file. They’re useful for quick & easy answers about overall dimensions, bolt hole sizes, thread pitches, etc.
  • DWG – this is AutoCAD’s “native language.” These files will open seamlessly in AutoCAD, if that’s what you’re using, along with many other programs. But, if it doesn’t.
  • STP – we’re well in to the 21st Century, and many designers have moved on from the above mentioned 2D files to solid models. Most solid modeling programs are compatible with these files.
  • SAT – these are, to STP, what DXF is to DWG…a “more friendly” file for certain solid model programs.

With the launch of our new website, we now offer 64 native extensions so you (hopefully) do not have to modify, import, or convert any drawing that would take additional modification – just download the file you need right from our Resources, 3D Models and CAD drawings link. And dare I say, if you can’t find the extension you need, you are using some fairly obscure software – perhaps an SAT or STP file will suit you.

If you’re designing a system or making an assembly drawing incorporating EXAIR catalog products, we have all of these in the CAD Library. If you need one for something that’s not in the catalog – a Super Air Knife less than 60″ long with a Plumbing Kit installed, for example – we can provide that as well...just contact an Application Engineer.

Russ Bowman, CCASS

Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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Compressed Air Leaks and the Problems They Cause

Over the Fourth of July I had a great opportunity to do some backpacking in the backwoods of the Adirondack Mountains in Upstate New York. “That sounds awesome!” is what most people would think; looking back on it, it was awesome. BUT, at the time it was the very definition of complete and total suffer fest. During my time on the trail, I learned three life lessons. First, always thoroughly study up on every bail out point along the trail. Second, water proofing has its limits; and thirdly, when things leak it is dreadful. After 7 miles of crawling over rocks and traversing lakes and streams in the pouring down rain everything was soaked and water was leaking through our rain jackets, leaving me and my girlfriend cold, wet, and sore as all get out – all on day one.

Heading up the Algonquin Mountain trail starting Colden Lake

Leaks don’t just stink when they appear in your rain coat, they are dreadful all around whether it is leaking faucets, a leaky basement or compressed air line leaks. Unlike the fact that I currently have no solution for the leaking rain coat, I do have a solution for your leaking air lines. Leaks are costly and an all-around waste of money that can have severe implications on how the air is being used and the entire system itself.

There are four main affects that a leak in your compressed air system can have and they are as follows; 1) leaks can cause a pressure drop across the system, 2) leaks shorten the life of almost all air supply system equipment, 3) leaks demand increased running time of the compressor, and 4) leaks produce unnecessary compressor capacity by demanding more and more air.

  • A pressure drop across your compressed air system can lead to a decreased efficiency of the end use equipment (i.e. an EXAIR Air Knife or Air Nozzle). This adversely effects production as it may take longer to blow off or cool a product or not blow off the product well enough to meet quality standards.
  • Leaks can shorten the life of almost all supply system components such as air compressors. This is because the compressor has to continuously run to make up for the air lost from leaks. By forcing the equipment to continuously run or cycle more frequently means that the moving parts in the compressor will wear down faster.
  • An increased run time due to leaks can also lead to more maintenance on supply equipment for the same reasons as to why the life of the compressor is shortened. The increase stress on the compressor and supply side components due to unnecessary running of the compressor.
  • Leaks can also lead to adding unnecessary compressor size. The wasted air that is being expelled from the leak is an additional demand in your system. If leaks are not fixed it may require a larger compressor to make up for the loss of air in your system.
EXAIR’s Ultrasonic Leak Detector

It is fairly easy to find these leaks, simply use EXAIR’s affordable Ultrasonic Leak Detector. This leak detector uses ultrasonic waves to detect where costly leaks can be found so that they can be patched or fixed. So don’t get stuck in some rainy day with your compressed air leaking everywhere; find those pesky leaks, mark them for maintenance and seal them up.

If you have any questions or want more information on EXAIR’s Ultrasonic Leak Detector or like products. Give us a call, we have a team of application engineers ready to answer your questions and recommend a solution for your applications.

Cody Biehle
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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