1004SS Back Blow Air Nozzle Clean Inside Small Diameters

Model: 1004SS

A metal fabricator made stainless steel tubes with a ½” (13mm) inner diameter.  Their process started by cutting the tubes into 8” (203mm) lengths.  The tubes would go through a wash system, then to a honing machine.   Once the inner diameter was honed to the specific diameter and concentricity, the tubes would be washed again for packaging.  The honing machine used oil to accurately grind the inner diameter.  Since oil and water does not mix, they had to dry the I.D. before honing.  They contacted EXAIR to see if we could find a solution.

Back Blow Air Nozzle Family

For cleaning the I.D. of parts, EXAIR manufactures three different sizes of Back Blow Air Nozzles that are designed to clean inside tubing, pipes, hoses, and channels.  They can range from internal diameters from ¼” (6.3mm) up to 16” (406mm).  The 360o rear airflow pattern can “wipe” the entire internal surface without contacting the surface to remove water, coolant, chips, and debris.  In reviewing the inner diameter above, I was able to recommend a model 1004SS Back Blow Air Nozzle.  This 316SS robust designed nozzle can fit inside and clean tubes with internal dimensions ranging from ¼” (6.3mm) to 1” (25mm); perfect for the ½” (13mm) diameter tube.

Model: 1604SS-12-CS

The customer indicated to me that there was a rush to start this project.  EXAIR stocks thousands of cataloged items for same day shipping.  He asked if EXAIR had any other components to help them to expedite their drying process.  Well, of course we do!  Since the tube was 8” (203mm) long, EXAIR has extension tubes that are used with our VariBlast Compact Back Blow Safety Air Gun.  We have them ranging from 6” (152mm) to 72” (1829mm) in incremental lengths.  For this customer, I recommended the 12” (305mm) extension to reach through the tube.  And, since it was a manual operation, I also recommended the model 9040 Foot Valve.

Model 9040 Foot Valve

Their operator could place the tube over the model 1004SS Back Blow Nozzle and with the Foot Valve, turn on the compressed air to dry the tubes.  With the powerful air stream, the entire internal surface was dry for the honing process to follow.

If you need to clean the inside of tubes, hoses, pipes, etc., EXAIR has the perfect nozzles for you, the Back Blow Air Nozzles.  EXAIR can attach these nozzles to our VariBlast Compact, Soft Grip and Heavy Duty Safety Air Guns for easy-to-use operations.  For this customer above, they were able to use components to get the operation running the next day.  If you need more information, you can share your application with an Application Engineer at EXAIR.  We will be happy to help.

John Ball
Application Engineer

Email: johnball@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_jb

It’s Shaping Up to Be a HOT Summer!

These last several weeks have been unprecedented for all of us. We’ve had a lot more time to spend isolated at home with our families and everyone’s begun to get a bit stir crazy. It’s a great opportunity to tackle some of those long overdue projects that have been stacking up. The lawns in the neighborhood have never been greener, there’s no excuses this year! This year’s summer garden is also shaping up to be a HOT one.

Starting my plants from seed this year has been a fulfilling journey (with plenty of learning curves!) but allowed me the opportunity to hand pick the varieties of peppers and tomatoes I’ll have later on in the year. For this year we’re really bringing the heat with a variety of superhot peppers: Peach Reapers, Purple Bhut Jolokia, Orange Long Tail Scorpion, and 7 Pot Lava Yellow along with a few “milder” peppers for when the heat gets a little too intense..

ghost-pepper-3726307_1920

It’s been a fun way to pass the time and look forward to this year’s growing season. But it won’t be just my mouth that’s hot this summer, the warmer temperatures associated with the summer months also cause numerous problems for the control panels in your facility.

SMSIDEcc_prA_800sqAD

EXAIR’s Cabinet Cooler Systems were designed specifically to rectify these issues. Utilizing Vortex Tube technology, the Cabinet Cooler produces cold air from an ordinary supply of compressed air. This cold air keeps the enclosure free of debris and moisture and is easily installed in minutes through a standard electrical knockout. Here is a short video that shows just how simple it really is.

 

The Cabinet Cooler Systems are available with Nema 12 (IP54) ratings and are also available in Aluminum, 303 Stainless Steel, and 316 Stainless Steel construction for Nema 4/4X (IP66) rated enclosures. For systems that are not able to be mounted on top of the cabinet, we also have Side Mount Kits available in Aluminum, 303 Stainless, and 316 Stainless. EXAIR has also recently introduced a new line of Hazardous Location Cabinet Coolers for use in classified areas.

To determine which size Cabinet Cooler is right for you, simply complete the Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide online. One of the EXAIR Application Engineers will then be able to determine the cooling capacity required based on the conditions of your cabinet. In less than 24 hours, you’ll have a response from us with the recommended model. With all Cabinet Cooler Systems available from stock, you can get one shipped out to you right away!

Don’t wait until it’s too late, EXAIR’s Cabinet Cooler is the simple solution for maintaining the temperature inside of your electronic enclosures.

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@EXAIR.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

 

Image courtesy of alvinmatt via Pixabay 

EXAIR and the Hierarchy of Controls

The CDC (Center for Disease Control) published a useful guide called “Hierarchy of Controls” that details (5) different types of control methods for exposure to occupational hazards while showing the relative effectiveness of each method.

NIOSH_Hierarchy_of_Controls
Hierarchy of Controls

 

The least effective methods are Administrative Controls and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). Administrative Controls involve making changes to the way people perform the work and promoting safe practices through training. The training could be related to correct operating procedures, keeping the workplace clean, emergency response to incidents, and personal hygiene practices, such as proper hand washing after handling hazardous materials. PPE is the least effective method because the equipment (ear plugs, gloves, respirators, etc.) can become damaged, may be uncomfortable and not used, or used incorrectly.

In the middle range of effectiveness is Engineering Controls. These controls are implemented by design changes to the equipment or process to reduce or eliminate the hazard. Good engineering controls can be very effective in protecting people regardless of the the actions and behaviors of the workers. While higher in initial cost than Administrative controls or PPE, typically operating costs are lower, and a cost saving may be realized in the long run.

The final two, Elimination and Substitution are the most effective but can be the most difficult to integrate into an existing process. If the process is still in the design phase, it may be easier and less expensive to eliminate or substitute the hazard. Elimination of the hazard would be the ultimate and most effective method, either by removing the hazard altogether, or changing the work process so the hazard is no longer part of the process.

EXAIR can help your company follow the Hierarchy of Controls, and eliminate, or substitute the hazards of compressed air use with relative ease. 

Home of Intelligent Compressed Air Products

Engineers can eliminate loud and unsafe pressure nozzles with designs that utilize quiet and intelligent compressed air products such as Air NozzlesAir Knives and Air Amplifiers. Also, unsafe existing products such as air guns, can be substituted with EXAIR engineered solutions that meet the OSHA standards 29 CFR 1910.242(b) and 29 CFR 1910.95(a).

In summary, Elimination and Substitution are the most effective methods and should be used whenever possible to reduce or eliminate the hazard and keep people safe in the workplace. EXAIR products can be easily substituted for existing, unsafe compressed air products in many cases. And to avoid the hazard altogether, remember EXAIR when designing products  or processes which require compressed air use for cooling, cleaning, ejection, and more. 

If you have questions about the Hierarchy of Controls and safe compressed air usage from any of the 15 different EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air® Product lines, feel free to contact EXAIR and myself or any of our Application Engineers can help you determine the best solution.

Jordan Shouse
Application Engineer

Send me an email
Find us on the Web 
Like us on Facebook
Twitter: @EXAIR_JS

 

Hierarchy of Controls Image:  used from  Public Domain

Compressor Maintenance: Steps to Minimize Wear

While I was still in college, I worked in a meat processing plant as a Project Engineer in the maintenance department. During my time in the maintenance department I learned the importance of proper maintenance on machines. A meat processing plant is one of the most taxing environments on machines as they will have to survive in extreme cold temperatures to extreme hot temperatures; they are also put through deep sanitation wash downs multiple times a day sometimes for periods of over an hour. The plant really put into perspective the importance of preventative maintenance of machines. This includes utilities such as a boiler and of course your air compressor.

Industrial Air Compressors
Neglected air compressors can cause a lot of issues ranging from expensive repairs to a decrease in efficiency. Wear and tear placed on the motor of an air compressor can cause the compressor to produce less compressed air (SCFM) at the same power consumption. This means you are paying the same amount of money for less compressed air.

A primary focus to prevent an increased amount of wear on your compressor motor is to seal up compressed air leaks. Leaks can cause the compressor to cycle more often and/or refill receiver tanks on a more frequent basis, causing the motor to run more often. With the motor having to run more often to keep the air present, it will wear down faster. Using EXAIR’s Ultra Sonic Leak detector, leaks can be found in the pipes so that they can be sealed up.

EXAIR Ultrasonic Leak Detector
Another important maintenance is to make sure that the compressor gets cleaned. As the motor runs excess heat is generated; the heat generated then needs to be dissipated which is done by exhausting air through vents. If these vents become dirty or blocked and the air cannot escape then the temperature of the motor and winding resistance will increase; this in turn will shorten the life of the motor and increase the energy consumption. Using one of EXAIR’s Super Air Nozzles is a sure way to keep your compressor vents clean and dust free in a quiet and efficient manner.
EXAIR Nozzles
There are many other items that require maintenance over time such as keeping belts in good condition and the drain traps clean. Good maintenance on any item whether it’s a production machine or  air compressor keeps it running a peak performance helping you save money and headaches in the long run. 

If you have any questions about compressed air systems or want more information on any EXAIR’s of our products, give us a call, we have a team of Application Engineers ready to answer your questions and recommend a solution for your applications.

Cody Biehle
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
Visit us on the Web
Follow me on Twitter
Like us on Facebook

The Bernoulli Principle

When catapults would hurl stones and projectiles at castles there weren’t thinking of how the stones flew or what could make them fly better, often they went with the “Tim Taylor method” of MORE POWER.  It wasn’t until thousands of years later that mathematicians started to talk about gases and liquids and how they react to different scenarios. Things like how does air react to a stone being launched through it. Johann Bernoulli played a significant role and calculated a lot of this out throughout his life and discovered what is now called the Bernoulli Principle.

Bernoulli discovered that when there is an increase in the speed of a fluid, a simultaneous decrease in fluid pressure occurs at the same time. This is what explains how a plane’s wing shape matters. It also can showcase how a curveball coming into the strike zone can fall out and cause an outlandish “STTTeeerriike Three” from the umpire. It is also sometimes confused with the Coandă effect. While both effects have a tremendous impact on our modern lives, the best way I have learned these effects is through videos such as the one below.

As mentioned within the video, there are numerous effects that can closely relate to the Bernoulli effect, the best example I see is the curveball which when implemented correctly can cause a very upset batter, while the pitcher has the game of his or her career.

If you would like to talk about some scientific discoveries that have you puzzled, or if you want to figure out how we can use one of these effects to help your application, contact us.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

 

Video Source: Fizzics Organization – 10/8/2014 – retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-c_oCKm5FLU&list=PLLKB_7Zd6leNJmORn6HHcF78o2ucquf0U

Super Air Amplifiers and Amplification Ratio

Super Air Amplifier Family

In the pneumatic industry, there are two types of Air Amplifiers.  One type will amplify the inlet air pressure to a higher compression.  The other type uses the inlet air pressure to amplify the air volume.  EXAIR manufactures the volume type called the Super Air Amplifiers™.

This change in air volume is called the amplification ratio.  So, what does this mean?  The definition of a ratio is the relation between two amounts showing the number of times one value is contained within the other.  For the Super Air Amplifier, it is the value that shows the amount of ambient air that is contained within the compressed air.  The higher the ratio, the more efficient the blowing device is.  With the EXAIR Super Air Amplifiers, we can reach amplification ratios up to 25 to 1.  This means that 25 parts of ambient “free” air is introduced for every 1 part of compressed air.

Air Amplifiers Are Great For blowing!

Why an EXAIR Super Air Amplifier?  Like a fan, they are designed to move air.  But fans use motors and blades to push the air toward the target.  The fan blades “slap” the air which creates turbulent air flows and loud noises. The Super Air Amplifiers do not use any blades or motors to move the air.  They just use a Coanda profile and a patented shim to create a low pressure to draw in the ambient air.  In physics, it is much easier to pull than it is to push.  The process of pulling air through the Super Air Amplifiers make them a more efficient, uniform, and quiet way to blow air.

Most people think that compressed air is free, but it is most certainly not.  Because of the amount of electricity required, compressed air is considered to be the fourth utility in manufacturing plants.  To save on utility costs, it is important to use compressed air as efficiently as possible.  In reference, the higher the amplification ratio, the more efficient the compressed air product.  Manufacturing plants that use open fittings, copper tubes, and drilled pipes for blowing are not properly using their compressed air system.  These types of products generally only have between a 2:1 to 5:1 amplification ratio.  The Super Air Amplifiers can reach a 25:1 ratio.

EXAIR manufactures and stocks five different sizes ranging from ¾” (19mm) up to 8” (203mm) in diameter.  Some of the benefits that the Super Air Amplifiers have is the inlet and outlet can be ducted for remote positioning.  They are very compact and can fit into tight places.  They do not have any moving parts to wear or need electricity to run.  They only need clean compressed air to operate; so, they are maintenance-free.

Another unique feature of the EXAIR Super Air Amplifier is the patented shim which optimizes the low-pressure to draw in more ambient air.   With extracting welding smoke, increasing cooling capacities, and moving material from point A to point B; the more air that can be moved, the better the performance.  And with the patented shim inside the EXAIR Super Air Amplifiers, it provides that.  As an added bonus, they are OSHA safe and meet the standards for noise level and dead-end pressure.

Super Air Amplifier Patented Shims

To explain things in every day terms; the amplification ratio can be represented by gas mileage.  Like your car, you want to get the most distance from a gallon of gasoline.  Similarly, with your compressed air system, you want to get the most for your pneumatic equipment.  An EXAIR Super Air Amplifier has a 25:1 amplification ratio.; so, in other words, you can get 25 mpg.  If you use drilled pipes, open fittings, copper tubes, etc. for blowing, then you are only getting 2 to 5 mpg.  If you want to get the most “distance” from your compressed air system, you should check the “gas mileage” of your blow-off components.  If you need assistance, an Application Engineer at EXAIR can help you to “tune up” your compressed air system.

John Ball
Application Engineer
Email: johnball@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_jb

People of Interest: Giovanni Battista Venturi March 15, 1746 – April 24, 1822

Giovanni Battista Venturi was born in 1746 to an affluent family in Reggio, Italy. An aspiring student, Giovanni was ordained as a priest and a professor by the age of 23. An avid historian of science at the University of Modena, he was the first to emphasize Leonardo da Vinci as a scientist rather than just an artist as he’s more commonly known. Despite his love for history, it wasn’t long before the University of Modena became aware of his talents in mathematics where they appointed him as professor of geometry and philosophy in 1774. During his tenure at the University of Modena, Giovanni was promoted to the Professor of Experimental Physics, served as the Duke of Modena as the State engineer and auditor, later serving diplomatic roles in both France and Switzerland.

Giovanni is most well-known for his work in developing what is now known as the venturi effect. In 1797, he published a study on the flow of water through short cylindrical tubes. It wasn’t until 1888 that Venturi’s design was applied to something practical when a man named Clemens Herschel received a patent for the first commercial venturi tube. The original purpose of the venturi tube was to measure the amount of water used in individual water mills and is still used to this day as a means of measuring fluid flows.

Venturi tube.jpg
Venturi Tube

The venturi effect is a principle in fluid dynamics and states that a fluid’s velocity must increase as it passes through a constricted pipe. As this occurs, the velocity increases while the static pressure decreases. The pressure drop that accompanies the increase in velocity is fundamental to the laws of physics. This is known as Bernoulli’s principle. Below is an illustration of how the venturi effect works inside of a constricted tube.

venturi

In everyday life, the venturi principle can be found inside of many small engines such as lawn mowers, gas powered scooters, motorcycles and older style automobiles. Inside the carburetor, there is a small tube through which filtered air flows from the intake. Inside of this tube is a short narrowing. When the air is forced to constrict, its velocity increases and creates a vacuum. This vacuum draws in fuel and mixes with the air stream causing it to atomize.  As the throttle valve is opened further, more fuel is forced into the engine. This increases the RPM and creates more power.

inlineworks
In-Line E-Vac

This principle is also applied to EXAIR’s line of E-Vac products to create vacuum. The .gif below illustrates how an In-Line E-vac works. (1) Compressed air flows through the inlet (2) and is directed through a nozzle, constricting the flow of air. (3) As the air stream exhausts, it expands causing a decrease in pressure and an increase in velocity prior to passing through the venturi. (4) A vacuum inlet tangential to the primary airflow is located at the suction point between the orifice and the venturi. (5) The airflow that is drawn through the vacuum inlet mixes with the primary airstream, then exhausts on the opposite end.

The venturi effect is used in a variety of other EXAIR products used for cooling, drying and cleaning, in addition to the vacuum generators. If you have a process in your facility that may benefit from an Intelligent Compressed Air solution, give us a call. We’d be happy to discuss your application and implement a solution to both reduce your compressed air costs and improve worker safety.

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

Photo: Venturi Tube with labels by ComputerGeezer an Geof.  GNU Free Documentation License