EXAIR Air Jets: Overview

Air Jet Family

EXAIR manufactures a variety of Air Nozzles and Jets to safely, efficiently and effectively blow compressed air. There are many different styles that can best fit specific applications. In this blog, I am going to discuss the EXAIR Air Jets. They are designed to entrain a high volume of ambient air to give a moderate blowing force. Similar to the Air Amplifiers, these miniature devices use very little compressed air to achieve an effective blowing for removing debris, drying parts, or cooling hot products. EXAIR manufactures two different styles, the High Velocity Air Jet and the Adjustable Air Jet.

The Air Jets use a Coanda profile for blowing. The Coanda effect was named after a Romanian aerodynamic pioneer, Henri Coanda who discovered a fluid flow phenomenon. He stated that “a jet of fluid emerging from an orifice to follow an adjacent flat or curved surface and to entrain fluid from the surroundings so that a region of lower pressure develops” (1). Since air is a fluid, it will react in the same manner. The EXAIR Air Jets create a high velocity air stream along an engineered profile. So, as the air “hugs” the profile, a low pressure is created which will draw in ambient air. The unique design of the Air Jet utilizes a ring jet of compressed air to produce that low pressure at the entrance, entraining the surrounding ambient air. This makes the Air Jet very efficient as it utilizes more ambient air than compressed air.

Depending on the environment or application, the Air Jets come in two types of material; brass and stainless steel. The High Velocity Air Jets use a shim to set a gap. The gap can be changed by installing a different thickness of shim to increase or decrease the blowing intensity. These shims in conjunction with a regulator gives versatility for a wide range of applications. If the desired blowing force needs to be changed for different types of products or flexibility is required “on the fly”, the Adjustable Air Jet would be recommended. It has a micrometer gap indicator to set the desired result. By twisting the plug of the Adjustable Air Jet, you can get output flows from a gentle breeze to a blast. What makes both Air Jets unique is the design. They meet the OSHA standard for noise level and dead-end pressure. If you block the output of the Air Jets, the pressure will not exceed the OSHA safety requirement for dead-end pressure. Also, the inlet and/or outlet can both be ducted for remote positioning.

Model 6013 High Velocity Air Jets help dry an engine casting

Our accessories can make the Air Jets easier to use.   We have Stay Set Hoses for easy connections and maneuverability. The Stay Set Hoses come in a variety of lengths from 6” (152mm) to 36” (915mm) and once you set the position, the Stay Set Hose will keep the Air Jet stationary even during blowing. You can add a Magnetic Base with the Stay Set Hose and Air Jet to mount the blowing unit right to a metal fixture. It has a 100 lb. (45.5Kg) pulling force to keep the Air Jet from moving until you need to move it. The bases come with a ¼ turn shut-off valve and in a single or dual output configuration. In addition to the above accessories, we also offer a model 9040 Foot Pedal valve for operator control of the duration of blowing with their foot, allowing the use both of their hands.

With the cost to make the compressed air utility being so high, it is important to use it as efficiently as possible. The High Velocity Air Jet and Adjustable Air Jet have the ability to give you effective blowing for removing debris, drying parts, or cooling objects without using a large amount of compressed air. With the accessory items included, you can set up an improved blowing station that will be effective, quiet, and efficient for your operators. The Air Jets are flexible and adaptable to be used in numerous types of blowing applications. If you have any questions about the Air Jets or if you would like to discuss any applications, you can contact an Application Engineer at EXAIR.

John Ball, Application Engineer
Email: johnball@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_jb

 

(1) Note: Coanda effect by Wikipedia.org

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