Generators for the EXAIR Vortex Tubes

Vortex generator

The EXAIR Vortex Tubes use compressed air to generate cold air down to -50 deg. F (-46 deg. C) without any moving parts, freon, or electricity.  By design, it will produce hot air at one end and cold air at the other.  EXAIR offers different cooling capacities ranging from 135 BTU/hr (34 Kcal/hr) to 10,200 BTU/hr (2,570 Kcal/hr).  This cooling phenomenon begins by spinning the air at a high rate of speed inside the Vortex Tube.  The “separation” of temperatures starts at the generator.  In this blog, I will discuss the features of the generator and how our design allows for an efficient way to cool and heat the air flows.

Vortex Family

EXAIR stocks three different sizes of the Vortex Tubes; small, medium, and large.  Each Vortex Tube will use a generator to define the cooling capacity and compressed air usage.  When compressed air enters the Vortex Tube, it will have to pass through the generator first.  The generators are engineered with vane openings to initiate the spinning of the air and to control the amount of air that can pass through it.  As an example, for a medium-sized Vortex Tube, a model 10-R generator will only allow 10 SCFM (283 SLPM) of air at 100 PSIG (6.9 Bar).  While in that same size body, a model 40-R generator will allow 40 SCFM (1,133 SLPM) of air at 100 PSIG (6.9 Bar) to be used.  Precision in the design of the generators is what sets EXAIR apart with efficiency and effectiveness in cooling.

EXAIR Vortex Tube Performance Chart

EXAIR created a chart to show the temperature drop for the cold end and temperature rise for the hot end, relative to the incoming compressed air temperature.  Across the top of the chart, we have Cold Fraction and along the side, we have the inlet air pressure.  The Cold Fraction is the percentage of the inlet air that will blow out the cold end of the Vortex Tube.  This is adjustable with a Hot Exhaust Air Valve at the hot end.

As you can see from the chart, the temperature difference changes as the Cold Fraction and inlet air pressure changes.  You may notice that it is independent of the size of the generator.  So, no matter which size Vortex Tube or generator is used, the temperature drop and rise will follow the chart above.  But just remember, cooling capacity is different than cooling temperature.  At the same settings, a larger generator will give you more mass of air to cool faster.

Now, let’s look inside the Vortex Tube (reference photo above).  As the compressed air passes through the generator, the change in pressure will create a powerful vortex.  This spinning vortex will travel toward one end of the tube where there is an air control valve, or Hot Air Exhaust Valve.  This valve can be adjusted to increase or decrease the amount of hot air that leaves the Vortex Tube.  The remaining part of the air is redirected toward the opposite end as the cold flow, or Cold Fraction.

Now, what separates EXAIR Vortex Tubes from our competitors are the three different styles of generators and two different materials for each size.  These generators are engineered to optimize the compressed air usage across the entire Cold Fraction chart above.  With temperatures above 125 oF (52 oC), EXAIR offers a brass generator for the Vortex Tubes.  The same precision design is applied but for higher ambient temperatures.  With the wide range of Vortex Tubes and generators, we can tackle many types of cooling applications.

If you would like to discuss your cooling requirement with an Application Engineer at EXAIR, we will be happy to help.  This unique phenomenon to generate cold air with no moving, freon, or electricity could be a great product to use in your application.

John Ball
Application Engineer
Email: johnball@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_jb

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