EXAIR Founders Day 2019

EXAIR celebrates Founder’s Day each year on February 22nd (or the closest working day) in order to commemorate the birthday of our founder, Roy Sweeney. He founded the company in 1983 and drove EXAIR to become the strong, successful and innovative company that it has over the years. Today would have been his 85th birthday.

We choose to make this day a celebration and a day to mark our ongoing commitment to the service of others in keeping with the values that Roy and his wife Jackie felt (and feel) very strongly about. It is now up to us to continue to look outside our company, outside ourselves and do what we can to improve the world around us.

As we do every year, EXAIR has made significant donations to organizations that are making a difference right here in our area:

• Dragonfly Foundation – supporting pediatric cancer patients and their families
(www.dragonfly.org)

• Master Provisions – supporting those in need with food, clothing and other items in the Greater Cincinnati area and abroad through mission trips
(www.masterprovisons.org)

• Cincinnati Youth Collaborative – supporting vulnerable children and young adults to overcome obstacles and succeed in education, career, and life
(www.cycyouth.org)

• Lighthouse Youth and Family Services – supporting their Safe and Supported program for LGBTQ youth (www.lys.org)

• DAV – supporting disabled American veterans and their families
(www.dav.org)

• Women’s Crisis Center – supporting victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and sexual abuse
(www.wccky.org)

To further our commitment to others, EXAIR established an Employee Volunteer Program last year that enables every full-time employee with at least 90 days of service to volunteer with organizations of their choice during the normal work week with full pay by EXAIR. I am proud to say that fifteen employees volunteered their time helping other organizations in 2018. Through this program, EXAIR and its employees can have a positive impact on dozens of organizations throughout the year.

So as we celebrate today with lunch from one of Roy’s favorite restaurants – Montgomery Inn – and funny memories, we wish Roy a happy birthday. We miss having him here. We remember what he did for all of us and for countless others. And we pledge to continue his commitment to helping those who need it.

Happy Founder’s Day from everyone at EXAIR!

Bryan Peters

EXAIR Founder’s Day 2018

Last year we announced that EXAIR will celebrate Founder’s Day each year on February 22nd (or the closest working day) in order to commemorate the birthday of our founder, Roy Sweeney. He founded the company in 1983 and drove EXAIR to become the strong, successful and innovative company that it has over the years. Today would have been his 84th birthday.

As we plan to every year, we choose to make this day a celebration and a day to mark our ongoing commitment to the service of others in keeping with the values that Roy and his wife Jackie felt (and feel) very strongly about. It is up to us to continue that commitment.

Like last year, we have made significant donations to organizations that are making a difference right here in our area:

• Freestore Foodbank (www.freestorefoodbank.com)

• Ronald McDonald House of Greater Cincinnati (www.rmhcincinnati.org)

• Women Helping Women (www.womenhelpingwomen.org)

• Bethany House Services (www.bethanyhouseservices.org)

• Elementz (www.elementz.org)

We committed last year to expand our community involvement in 2018, and we have delivered upon that promise. I am proud to announce that EXAIR has established an Employee Volunteer Program that enables every full-time employee with at least 90 days of service to volunteer with organizations of their choice during the normal work week with full pay by EXAIR.

Through this further commitment, we expect that EXAIR and its employees will impact not just a handful, but dozens of organizations and make a much larger positive impact in the community starting this year.

So as we celebrate today with cake and funny memories, we wish Roy a happy birthday. We miss having him here. We remember what he did for all of us and for countless others. And we pledge to continue his commitment to helping those who need it.

Happy Founder’s Day from everyone at EXAIR!

Bryan Peters
President
EXAIR Corporation

EXAIR Founder’s Day – 2017

founders-day-2017-2

We have decided that EXAIR will celebrate Founder’s Day each year on February 22nd (or the closest working day) in order to commemorate the birthday of our founder, Roy Sweeney.  He founded EXAIR in 1983 and was the driving force behind building the strong, successful and innovative company that EXAIR has become over the years.  Today would have been his 83rd birthday.

 We choose to make this day a celebration, a fond remembrance, and a day of service to others much in keeping with the values that Roy felt very strongly about.  Countless individuals, churches, charities, youth groups and performing arts organizations were helped by the strong commitment to philanthropy practiced by Roy and his wife Jackie. 

We here at EXAIR are blessed to have had Roy in our lives, and we want his giving spirit to live on through us.  To commemorate this initial Founder’s Day, we have made significant contributions to:

·         Special Olympics (www.specialolympics.org)

·         Freestore Foodbank (www.freestorefoodbank.org)

·         Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra (www.cincinnatisymphony.org)

·         Wounded Warrior Project (www.woundedwarriorproject.org)

·         MusiCorps (www.musicorps.net)

We fully expect to extend this new tradition next year, and in subsequent years, through further commitment to community involvement.

So as we celebrate today with cake and funny memories, we wish Roy a happy birthday.  We miss having him here.  We remember what he did for all of us and for countless others.  And we pledge to continue his commitment to helping those who need it.

Happy Founder’s Day from everyone at EXAIR!

Bryan Peters
President
EXAIR Corporation

Don’t Be Fooled by Fool’s Gold

Fool’s Gold, or pyrite, is a mineral with a superficial resemblance to gold.

Here at EXAIR, we are always trying to get better at helping our customers.  You can see that in our award winning products, and you can see it in our never-ending quest to improve our service levels.  We are always testing, measuring and verifying our performance, whether it’s our products or our service.  We always want to know how we are doing and that we are delivering what we promise to our customers. 

And, of course, we always want to know how we stack up against our competition.  We constantly benchmark ourselves against others.  In that spirit, we test a LOT of products from other companies and compare them both with our own products and against the specifications promised by the manufacturer.  One recent test was eye-opening, and should point out the perils of trusting in “Fool’s Gold”…

Well, it LOOKED pretty good coming out of the box.  It was shiny.  It had a decent finish, despite some questionable design choices.  It had the appearance of a tool with some utility.  The manufacturer had chosen to publish specifications for this product that were, not coincidentally, slightly better than our specs for that sort of product.  This isn’t surprising – other companies are always trying to match EXAIR, although most fail in that regard.  An unsuspecting buyer who chose to purchase this product based on those specifications would be terribly disappointed once they put this particular item into service, however.  You see, as often happens, this product of inferior design and substandard workmanship couldn’t deliver what its manufacturer had promised.  That is not to say that it delivered LESS than the manufacturer said it would.  No, it delivered much, much MORE than advertised

At an inlet pressure of 80 PSIG, this product consumed 49.6% more compressed air than its manufacturer claimed.  And the noise level?  It was 13.7 dBA louder than promised.  To put that in perspective, the increase in noise level would make the product seem more than twice as loud as one that performs as promised.

Over promising and under delivering are a common problem in many industries.  In this case, the broken promises are bad enough, but these unrealistic performance claims carry along with them very real costs.  This product consumed about 67 SCFM more than advertised.  That means it was wasting 67 cubic feet of compressed air every minute it was in operation.  This equates to over 160,000 cubic feet of compressed air wasted each week by just one unit running during an eight hour shift, five days per week.  That’s over 8 million cubic feet of compressed air wasted each year for every one of these units that are put into operation. 

To put that into monetary terms, an unsuspecting buyer of this sort of inferior product would be wasting nearly $2100 per year per unit in unexpected operational costs simply because the manufacturer could not deliver what they promised. 

Wasting $2100 per year in order to operate a tool that is supposed to save you money is an unwelcome and unwanted surprise.  Imagine that waste multiplied across a plant-wide installation.  Facility managers would be coming with pitchforks if they knew this was going on in their plants.

Don’t be fooled by Fool’s Gold that isn’t what it seems to be and doesn’t deliver what it claims.

Here are some tips from the History Channel to help identify Fool’s Gold.

Claims are easy, proof is hard.

Bryan Peters
President

EXAIR Receives Four Product of the Year Awards from Plant Engineering Magazine for 2012

EXAIR was recognized by Plant Engineering Magazine as a Product of the Year Award winner in four different categories this past Monday evening at a celebration in Chicago.  Readers of the magazine vote to choose the products that they think are the best in each category.

These were the categories and the products that were chosen:

w2012POTYtrophies_600x390

It was a great evening and a wonderful ceremony put together by Jim Langhenry, Bob Vavra, and all of the great folks at CFE Media.  As one person at our table said, “it’s a celebration of great people and great companies that still MAKE things!”  Everyone here at EXAIR certainly is happy to be a part of a great evening for manufacturing. It was an honor to be chosen for so many prestigious awards and recognized along with so many other industry leaders that still believe that manufacturing and innovation have an important place in our changing world.

Here at EXAIR we are celebrating our 30th year in business, and we are proud that our long history of industry leadership, our continuous development of innovative products, and our great people continue to drive us forward each day.

We don’t do it for the awards or recognition – but they sure are great additions to our large collection!

Claims are easy, proof is hard.

Bryan Peters
President

Why NOT Manufacturing?

Did you watch the presidential debate last Tuesday night?  I did, it was the best debate that I’ve ever seen.  Many others with longer frames of reference than me are saying the same thing.

This isn’t a blog where I’m going to analyze the debate and weigh in on who I think won and who lost.  There are thousands of media types and bloggers that have that job, and they are welcome to it.

But there was a moment in the “town hall” debate last Tuesday where one of the audience members asked what the candidates proposed to help college students have more opportunities to land jobs after graduation.  Both candidates included manufacturing in their responses.  It wasn’t the first or the last time that manufacturing was mentioned that night, which is a good thing.

One of the great things about Twitter is that you can read and post commentary about live events as they happen.  It was very interesting to read my Twitter timeline during the debate.  I stopped when an old friend, who happens to be a member of the media (notice I didn’t say “liberal” or “left-wing” media), sent out a tweet saying that college graduates would not be interested in working in manufacturing.  Obviously, that didn’t sit well with me, and we had a bit of back and forth about it yesterday.

One of the other interesting things that I’ve noticed about this election year is the higher level of interest shown by younger people.  My daughter, a high school junior that is too young to vote, has watched all of the debates so far.  And so have many of her friends.  Can you imagine being interested enough to follow presidential and vice-presidential debates at age 16 or 17?  I can’t.  That was a real eye opener for me.

Anyway, my daughter was having Twitter exchanges during the debate with her friends as well.  One of her friends commented that no one should believe that high-wage, high-skill jobs would be found in manufacturing.

So in real-time during the debate exchange on the topic, friends of ours in the media AND a great student were stating their doubt that manufacturing could be part of the jobs solution for those with an education.

Folks, this is the perception that we have to turn around.

If the media doesn’t think we are viable as an industry and as job creators, that’s a big problem.  If students don’t think we are a viable career path, that’s a HUGE problem.  If no one out there is telling the story of manufacturing, and up-and-coming entrants into the workforce won’t give us a look, our days as a viable industry are numbered.  I know, many people have been saying that for years, but I happen to think that rumors of our demise are a bit premature.

 Here are some highlights about the economic impact of manufacturing in America:

  • Manufacturing accounts for 12.2% of US GDP
  • Manufacturing employs 12 million people, or 9% of the workforce
  • Manufacturing unemployment rate 11.5% BELOW the national average
  • Manufacturing annual earnings 36.8% ABOVE the national average
  • 19.4% of all good manufactured globally are made in the US
  • If the US manufacturing economy were its own country, it would rank #9 in the world

Can you believe that we have people that don’t understand the impact and opportunities of manufacturing in this country?  It’s mind blowing.  We have to change the decades-old perception that manufacturing is a dying industry, and we have to do it quickly.

Take a look around wherever you are right now.  Anything man made that you see was MANUFACTURED somewhere.  We really couldn’t live our daily lives as we do today without manufacturing.

We have to get this information out there, by any means necessary, so that the next generation understands that we WANT highly skilled, educated people in our manufacturing businesses and that they have the opportunity to earn ABOVE AVERAGE income in exchange for those skills.

Many others have written about the outreach efforts that are needed for manufacturing but are lacking at present.  Tuesday’s debate crystallized the need as starkly as ever for me.

Bryan Peters
President

An Open Letter to All Politicians

As Election Day just passed, it seemed like an appropriate time to engage in expressing some widely shared sentiment about the state of our country and the equally alarming state of its leadership.

Personally, I don’t identify myself or my political beliefs by party affiliation.  I have no t-shirts identifying myself with the letter “D” or the letter “R” (ok, I have a couple with a D on them but it has nothing to do with politics).  I don’t pay particular attention to whether I live in a “red” state or a “blue” one (it actually changes colors from time to time).  I have no real preference for donkeys or elephants (I do, however, notice that the things they leave behind have a lot in common).  When Facebook asked my political affiliation, I chose the “Common Sense Party”.  Why would Facebook care about this?  There’s hardly anything more amusing than watching friends argue politics to the point of exhaustion on the almighty public forum that is Facebook.  It’s not nearly as amusing as it is frightening that politics has become religion in this country, complete with blind devotion and intolerance.

Thanks to a busy life, I know a lot of people.  All different kinds of people.  Business owners, bankers, attorneys and accountants.  Health care workers.  Government employees.  Pastors.  Factory workers, artists, engineers, maintenance workers.  People that are unemployed, and people surviving on public assistance.  Students, teachers and school administrators.  Public safety workers.  It’s really a pretty diverse cross section when you think about it.  And yet, most of us have some things in common with regard to politics and our government.

We’re pissed.  We’re disgusted.  We’re fed up.

Most of our politicians long since forgot the reasons they were elected, but instead have succumbed to the siren’s songs of tenure, rank and power.  Time that should be spent doing the nation’s business is instead spent posturing for television cameras and other media in an inane fashion in order to build personal brands, attract contributions, and jockey for position within their own parties. 

The one with the most face time wins, right?  Wrong.  We all lose.

The overwhelming quest for attention, advancement and re-election has trumped the idea of doing their elected jobs well.  There’s no excuse for not approving the federal budget on time for most of the past 35 years.  There’s also no excuse for not raising the debt ceiling this past August until the last possible moment.  It seems that the upcoming fiscal reform deadline is destined for the same fate.  There’s no excuse for delaying the more difficult decisions until 2013 and beyond.  A responsible budget policy?  No.  A coordinated manufacturing policy?  Nowhere in sight.  Immigration reform?  No.  Meaningful campaign finance reform?  Keep dreaming.

Common sense is apparently out of our reach for the foreseeable future. 

Is it any wonder that we now have a generation (an entire generation!) that doesn’t really see the value in voting?  Is it any wonder that we’ve seen the emergence of groups like the Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street? 

The dissatisfaction of most people I know is already palpable and still growing.  Most of us are ordinary people, people that would prefer to concentrate on things in our lives OTHER than politics.  And yet we can’t because the dysfunction in the current system is very close to leaving us no alternative but to become much MORE involved.

Arab Spring should be a cautionary tale for our nation’s leaders.  If our elected representatives won’t fix the system, then ordinary people will have no choice but to fix it ourselves.

Thanks for reading – this was cathartic.

Bryan Peters
President
bryanpeters@exair.com