The Impressive ROI of an Engineered Air Nozzle

You may have asked…why should I switch over to an engineered air nozzle if my system already works? Or…How can air nozzles be much different?

Manufacturing has always been an advocate for cost savings, where they even have job positions solely focused on cost savings. Return on Investment (ROI) is a metric they look toward to help make good decisions for cost savings.  The term is used to determine the financial benefits associated with the use of more efficient products or processes compared to what you are currently using. This is like looking at your homes heating costs and then changing out to energy efficient windows and better insulation. The upfront cost might be high but the amount of money you will save over time is worth it.

Model 1100 Super Air Nozzles can save compressed air dollars and increase safety

But how is ROI calculated? It is very simple to calculate out your potential savings of using one of EXAIR’s Intelligent Engineered Compressed Air Products. If you would rather not do the calculations out yourself then we can do it for you by sending the item in question to our Efficiency Lab Testing. The Efficiency Lab Testing is a free service that we offer to show you the possible savings by switching to one of our products.

The following is a simple ROI  calculation for replacing open blowoffs with an EXAIR Super Air Nozzle:

  • ¼” Copper Pipe consumes 33 SCFM at 80 psig (denoted below as CP)
  • A Model 1100 ¼” Super Air Nozzle can be used to replace and only uses 14 SCFM at 80 psig (denoted below as EP)

Calculation:

(CP air consumption) * (60 min/hr) * (8 hr/day) * (5 days/week) * (52 weeks/year) = SCF used per year for Copper Pipe  

(33) * (60) * (8) * (5) * (52) = 4,118,400 SCF

(EP air consumption) * (60 min/hr) * (8 hr/day) * (5 days/week) * (52 weeks/year) = SCF used per year for EXAIR Product  

               (14) * (60) * (8) * (5) * (52) = 1,747,200 SCF

Air Savings:

SCF used per year for Copper Pipe – SCF used per year for EXAIR Product = SCF Savings

               4,118,400 SCF – 1,747,200 SCF = 2,371,200 SCF in savings

If you know the facilities cost to generate 1,000 SCF of compressed air you can calculate out how much this will cost you would save. If not, you can us $0.25 to generate 1,000 SCF which is the value used by the U.S. Department of Energy to estimate costs.

Yearly Savings:

                (SCF Saved) * (Cost / 1000 SCF) = Yearly Savings

                                (2,371,200 SCF) * ($0.25 / 1000 SCF) = $592.80 annual Savings

With the simple investment of $42 (as of date published) you can calculate out the time it will take to pay off the unit.

Time Until payoff:

                (Yearly Savings) / (5 days/week * 52 weeks/year) = Daily Savings

                                ($592.80/year) / (5 days/week * 52 weeks/year) = $2.28 per day

                (Cost of EXAIR Unit) / (Daily Savings) = Days until product has been paid off

                                ($42) / ($2.28/day) = 17.9 days  

As you can see it doesn’t have to take long for the nozzle to pay for itself, and then continue to contribute toward your bottom line. 

If you have any questions about compressed air systems or want more information on any of EXAIR’s products, give us a call, we have a team of Application Engineers ready to answer your questions and recommend a solution for your applications.

Cody Biehle
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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A Simple Explanation of the Venturi Effect

The Venturi Effect was discovered by Italian physicist Giovanni Battista Venturi who lived between 1746 and 1822. In practice, there were a number of other physicists who were involved in the Venturi Effect but Giovanni Venturi is generally accepted as the first person to discover and explain the effect. So, what is the Venturi Effect, and how does it affect practical everyday living?

“A Venturi is a system for speeding the flow of the fluid by constricting it in a cone shape tube. In the restriction, the fluid increases its velocity, which reduces its pressure and produces a partial vacuum. As the fluid leaves the constriction, its pressure increases back to the ambient or pipe level.”

Any substance that flows is considered a fluid. This includes such things as water, shampoo, sunscreen, and even honey. Although not necessarily obvious, even gases, such as air, can be classified as fluids. So why would someone at EXAIR be talking about Venturi? Our E-Vacs use the Venturi Effect to create vacuum

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is in-line-e-vac-how-it-works.jpg

For most people the Venturi Effect is difficult to understand because you might expect the pressure to increase when a fluid is pushed through a restricted area. The fact that the increase in velocity is greater than any potential increase in pressure means that there is a net increase in velocity and a net reduction in pressure. The ability to mix-and-match certain fluids and gases via this process is relatively straightforward because the reduced pressure allows other substances to be sucked in through a connecting pipe at a rate of your choice.

EXAIR uses the Venturi Effect and other principles within the development of our engineered products. If you have questions or need a solution please call 800.903.9247 or visit us on www.EXAIR.com and let us help you.

Eric Kuhnash
Application Engineer
E-mail: EricKuhnash@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_EK

 

Photo: Venturi Tube with labels by ComputerGeezer an Geof.  GNU Free Documentation License

Happy Thanksgiving from EXAIR!

Well…here we are…we made it to the Holiday season of 2020.

Happy Thanksgiving from all of EXAIR to all of you!

Chances are that you may be feeling the same as we do – tired, disoriented, anxious, ready for “normalcy”, etc. A global pandemic, and the changes that have occurred because of it,  will have that effect on people. But then again here in the USA, that may be due to an election, but I digress…

Fortunately, Thanksgiving reminds us to take the time to recognize the good things that are happening around us, to be thankful and show gratitude. There have been many studies on gratitude and they have shown, at the least, there is a connection between gratitude and happiness. This Harvard Health article offers good insight about the power of gratitude and a good list of how we may begin to express gratitude ourselves, summarized below:

  • Write a thank-you note. –  It helps you and helps strengthen your relationships
  • Thank someone mentally. – If you don’t have time to write, do this.
  • Keep a gratitude journal. – Make it a habit and it turns into a journal.
  • Count your blessings. – Recognize good things that have happened
  • Pray. – Religious folk can use prayer to grow gratitude
  • Meditate. – you can meditate and focus on good things.

Today, I am thankful for music and its relaxing effect. I am grateful for the ability to go hiking and have the sun on my face.  Enjoy your days and Happy Thanksgiving.

The EXAIR team
Ph. 1-800-903-9247      1-513-671-3322
EXAIR.com 

EXAIR will be closed Nov 26-27, 2020 for Thanksgiving.