Basics of the Compressor Room

EXAIR Corporation has staked our reputation on a keen ability to help you get the most out of your compressed air system since 1983.  Now, the bulk of our expertise lies in the implementation and proper use of engineered products on the demand side, but we fully recognize that there are critical elements for optimization on the supply side too.  And that, quite literally, starts in the compressor room.  This is not an exhaustive, specifically detailed list, but here are some you might consider to get the most from the (again, quite literally) beginning:

  • Location.  If you’re building a new facility, or doing a major rehab of your existing one, having the compressor room as close as practical to the point(s) of use is best, IF all other things are equal.  You’ll use less pipe if you don’t have to run it so far.  You’ll also be able to use smaller diameter lines because you won’t have to worry about line loss (pressure drop due to friction as the air flows through the total length) as much.
  • Location part 2.  If all other things are NOT equal, having the compressor room close to the point of use may not be best for you.
    • Your air compressor pulls in air from the immediate environment.  It’s better to go with longer and bigger pipe in your distribution system than it is to put your compressor in a location where it’ll pull in dust & particulate from grinding operations, humidity from a boiler plant, fumes from chemical production, etc.
    • There are some pretty darn quiet air compressors out there, but there are some pretty loud ones too.  Especially in small to mid size facilities, putting the compressor in an area that upsizes the required piping is still likely a better idea, due to the downsizing of the noise levels that personnel will be exposed to.
  • Environment.  No matter where your compressor is located, the machine itself should be protected from heat and other harsh environmental elements.  That means if it’s inside the plant, the compressor room should be adequately ventilated.  In some situations, the compressor may be best installed outside the plant, in its own building or protective structure.  This should be designed to protect against solar load…in addition to the high temperature associated with a hot summer day, the sun’s rays beating down on your air compressor will radiate a tremendous amount of heat into it.
  • Filtration.  Whatever is in the air in your compressor room is going to get into your compressed air.  This is doubly problematic: particulate debris can damage the air compressor’s moving parts, and it can likewise damage your pneumatic cylinders, actuators, tools, motors, etc. as well.  Make sure the intake of your compressor is adequately filtered.
  • Maintenance.  Air compressors, like any machinery with moving parts, require periodic preventive maintenance, and corrective maintenance when something inevitably breaks down.  There should be adequate space factored in to your compressor room’s layout for this.  The only thing worse than having to fix something is not having the room to fix it without taking other stuff apart.
Patrick Duff, a production equipment mechanic with the 76th Maintenance Group, takes meter readings of the oil pressure and temperature, cooling water temperature and the output temperature on one of two 1,750 horsepower compressors. Each compressor is capable of producing 4,500 cubic feet of air at 300 psi. The shop also has a 3,000 horsepower compressor that produces 9,000 cubic feet of air at 300 psi. By matching output to the load required, the shop is able to shut down compressors as needed, resulting in energy savings to the base. (Air Force photo by Ron Mullan)

These are a few things to consider on the supply end.  If you’d like to talk about how to get the most out of your compressed air system, EXAIR is keen on that.  Give us a call.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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Happy Holidays Everyone!

Once again, the celebrations and giving around the EXAIR office become common. It is a joy to take a moment away from selling air nozzles together and simply enjoy each other’s company. Fortunately for us, we are good at it!

We will also be enjoying some time away from the office, as we will be closed Dec 23, 24, and 25. While we celebrate the New Year, we will be closed Dec 30, 31 and Jan 1.

We hope that all of you, too, get some time away from your jobs to spend with friends and family. Take advantage of any time off whether is is to relax, have fun, read, nap, volunteer, or whatever YOU choose. EXAIR hopes your holidays are what you want them to be.

 

Super Air Knives: Another Intelligent Compressed Air Solution with Quick ROI

Any time you’re considering a new purchase your return on investment is a critical aspect of the decision-making process. A recent case for me this past year was the purchase of a new riding lawn mower. What used to take me 2-hours to mow my entire yard, now only takes 45 minutes. Mowing 1 time per week throughout the growing season, I was able to save over an hour of my time each week! Considering that I’ll mow the lawn approximately 25 times per year, that’s more than a full day’s worth of time saved over the course of a year.

Some products, however, provide a monetary value due to reduced operating costs. For example, an LED light bulb may cost more initially but will use less energy to operate as well as have a longer lifespan than an incandescent bulb. You can calculate, down to the day, when you’ll recoup the costs difference from buying the more expensive bulb.

The same can be said for EXAIR’s Intelligent Compressed Air Products. An extrusion company had a line where they were using (3) modular-hose style flat nozzles. (1) was placed just before a water bath to remove some of the initial heat, (2) were then placed as the material exited the bath to dry the material after it was cooled. While they did work, they had begun to notice pressure drops in their compressed air system that was causing issues for other processes in the facility.

KIMG0161

The (3) nozzles were all operated at 50 PSIG consuming 17 SCFM per nozzle for a total consumption of 51 SCFM. They were operated for one full 8-hour shift, 5 days per week.

51 SCFM x 60 mins x 8-hours = 24,480 SCF/day

Since they had a range of different sizes of material they process with the widest up to 2.5”, we recommended replacing the modular style hose flat nozzles with EXAIR’s 3” Super Air Knife. At a pressure of 50 PSIG, (3) Model 110003 Super Air Knives consumes just 17.1 SCFM.

17.1 SCFM x 60 mins x 8-hours = 8,208 SCF/day

By implementing the Super Air Knife, they reduced their compressed air consumption for this particular application by 66.4%!! But, just how quickly will that air savings provide them with a return on their investment? Let’s calculate the savings:

The average cost for compressed air is $0.25/1000 SCF. Before the installation of the Super Air Knives, the total consumption was 24,480 SCF/day.

24,480 SCF x $0.25/1000 SCF = $6.12/ day

With the Super Air Knives, this was reduced to just 8,208 SCF/ day:

8,208 SCF x $0.25/1000 SCF = $2.05/ day

Total Savings – $4.07 each day!!!

The 2019 list price on the Model 110003 is $206.00. Since they bought (3) their total investment was $618.00.

$618.00/$4.07 = 151.84 (152 days)

On the 152nd day, the customer will have saved enough money from the reduced air consumption to account for the initial purchase price of the Super Air Knives. Once they’re paid for, it isn’t like you just stop saving money. These knives will continue to save money, each shift, day in and day out. If there’s a process in your facility that you can improve upon, give us a call. We’re also able to test it out here at EXAIR and report back to you on the savings through our free Efficiency Lab!

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@EXAIR.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

A Brief History of Compressed Air

So where exactly did compressed air come from? How did it become so widely used and where will it go? Both of these are great questions and the answers lie below.

Compressed air can be traced all the way back to the classic bellows that were used to fuel blacksmith fires and forges.  These started as hand pumped bellows, they then scaled up to foot pumped, multiple person pumped, oxen or horse driven and then eventually waterwheel driven.  All of these methods came about due to the demand for more and more compressed air. These bellows did not generate near the amount of air pressure or volume needed for modern day practices yet they worked in the times.  These early bellows pumps would even supply miners with air.

With the evolution of metallurgy and industry these bellows were replaced by wheel driven fans, then steam came about and began generating more industrial sources of power.  The main issue with steam was that it would lose its power over longer runs of pipe due to condensing in the pipes.  Thus the birth of the air compressor was born. One of the largest projects that is noted to first use compressed air was in 1861 during the build of the Mont Cenis Tunnel in Switzerland in which they used compressed air machinery.  From here the constant need and evolution for on-demand compressed air expanded.  The picture below showcases two air compressors from 1896.

compressed_air_28189629_281459402261829
Air Compressors from the old days.

The compressors evolved over time from single stage, to two-stage reciprocating, on to compound, rotary-screw compressors, rotary vane, scroll, turbo, and centrifugal compressors with variable frequency drives.  The efficiency of each evolution has continued to increase.  More output for the same amount of input.  Now we see a two-stage compressor, considered old technology, and wonder how the company can get any work done.

All of the technological advances in compressor technology were driven by the demand sides of the compressed air systems.  Companies needed to power more, go further, get more from less, ultimately increase production.  With this constant increase in demand, the supply of compressed air increased and more efficient products for using compressed air began to evolve so the air was used more efficiently.

Enter EXAIR, we evolved the blowoff to meet the increasing demands of industrial companies to get the same amount of work done with less compressed air. We have continually evolved our product offering since 1983.  It all started with just a few typed pages of part numbers and has evolved to a 208 page catalog offering of Intelligent Compressed Air Products® for industry.  We will also continue to evolve our product designs for continued improvement of compressed air usage.  This is all to better help companies retain their resources.

cat32_500p
EXAIR Catalog 32

If your company uses compressed air and you aren’t sure if it is efficiently being utilized, contact an Application Engineer.  Thanks for joining us for the brief history lesson, we look forward to hearing from you and seeing what the future brings.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
@EXAIR_BF BrianFarno@EXAIR.com

 

Compressed air (1896) (14594022618).jpg – Wikimedia Commons – Internet Archive Book Images – Link

 

You Don’t Need to Spend Thousands to Optimize Your Compressed Air System

There is no denying it, saving compressed air is a process.  This process often involves some type of energy audit or at the very least an evaluation of something going wrong with production and a way to improve it.  Many programs, consultants, and sales reps will devise a solution for the problem.

Often times the solution is to create a more efficient supply side of the compressed air system. The supply side is essentially everything within the compressor room or located in close proximity to the actual air compressor. While optimizing the supply side can amount to savings, many of these solutions and services can involve great expense, or capital expenditure processes.  These processes can often lead to delays and continued waste until the solution is in place.  What if there was a way to lower compressed air usage, save energy, solve some demand issues on the compressed air system and save some money while the capital expenditure process goes through for the larger scale project.

These solutions are a simple call, chat, email or even fax away. Our Application Engineers are fully equipped to help determine what points of your compressed air demand side can be optimized. The process generally starts with our Six Steps To Compressed Air Optimization.

6 Steps from Catalog

Once the points of use are evaluated the Application Engineer can give an engineered solution to provide some relief to the strain on your compressed air supply side.  For instance, an open copper pipe blow off that is commonly seen within production environments can easily be replaced with a Super Air Nozzle on the end of a Stay Set Hose that will still bend and hold position like the copper pipe does while also saving compressed air, reducing noise level, and putting some capacity back into the supply side of the compressed air system.

engineered nozzle blow offs
Engineered solutions (like EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air Products) are the efficient, quiet, and safe choice.

One of the key parts to the solutions that we offer here at EXAIR is they all ship same day on orders received by 3 PM ET that are shipping within the USA. To top that off the cost is generally hundreds, rather than thousands (or tens of thousands) of dollars. Well under any level of a capital expenditure and can generally come in as a maintenance purchase or purchased quickly through the supply cribs.  Then, to take this one step further, when the EXAIR solution shows up within days and gets installed EXAIR offers for you to send in the blow off that was replaced and receive a free report on what level of compressed air savings and performance increases you will be seeing and provide a simple ROI for that blow off (though we would also encourage a comparison before a purchase just so you have additional peace of mind).

This amounts to saving compressed air and understanding how much air is being saved, adding capacity back into your supply side which will reduce strain on the air compressor, give the ability to increase production while the capital expenditure for the end solution of controls and higher efficiency on the supply side is approved to then save even more compressed air and energy.

The point is this, savings and efficiency doesn’t have to involve a capital expenditure, if that is the end game for your project that is great! Let EXAIR provide you a solution that you can have in house by the next business day to save money NOW and then put that savings towards another project. No matter the method, it all starts with a call, chat, email or fax.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

 

Does a 38 Day Simple ROI Sound Good? Use Engineered Compressed Air Blowoff Products!

After getting a baseline measurement of the air consumption in your facility and locating and fixing leaks in your system, it’s time to begin implementing some changes. Step 3 of the 6 Steps to Optimizing Your Compressed Air System covers upgrading your blowoff, cooling, and drying operations using engineered compressed air products.

sixsteps_3

This step can have the most impact when it comes to your bottom line. The energy costs associated with the generation of compressed air make it one of the most expensive utilities for any industrial environment. Because of this, we need to ensure that the places in your facility that are using compressed air are doing so efficiently.

EXAIR manufactures a variety of products that can help to ensure you’re using your compressed air in the best way possible. What it may seem simple, easy, and cheap to use something like an open-ended pipe or tube for blowoff, the fact of the matter is that the volume of air that these homemade solutions use quickly make them more expensive. Super Air Nozzles have been designed to entrain ambient air along with the supplied compressed air, allowing you to achieve a high force from the output of the nozzle while keeping compressed air usage to a minimum. In addition to saving air, they’ll also provide a significant reduction in overall sound level.

drilled pipe
homemade drilled pipe

Another product that can be used to increase the efficiency of your blowoff processes is the Super Air Knife. Available in lengths ranging from 3”-108” and in a variety of materials, the Super Air Knife is the ideal replacement for inefficient drilled pipes. Again, it may seem cheaper to just drill a few holes in a pipe whenever you need to cover a wide area but the volume of air consumed in addition to the incredibly high sound level will quickly drain your compressor. The Super Air Knife is also designed to entrain ambient air, at a rate of 40:1! Allowing you to take advantage of the free ambient air in addition to the supplied air.

Let’s compare the costs difference between a homemade drilled pipe and EXAIR’s Super Air Knife. The Super Air Knife has a precisely set air gap across the full length of the knife, allowing for an efficient and quiet laminar airstream. When compared to a drilled pipe, the air consumption is dramatically reduced as is the sound level. For example, let’s take an 18” section of drilled pipe, with 1/16” diameter holes spaced out every ½”. At 80 PSIG, each hole consumes 3.8 SCFM. With a total of 37 holes, this equates to a total of 140.6 SCFM.

3.8 SCFM x 37 = 140.6 SCFM

A Super Air Knife, operated at 80 PSIG with .002” stock shim installed will consume a total of 2.9 SCFM per inch of knife. An 18” SAK would then consume just 52.2 SCFM.

2.9 SCFM x 18 = 52.2 SCFM

140.6 SCFM – 52.2 SCFM = 88.4 SCFM saved 

Replacing an 18” drilled pipe with a Super Air Knife represents a total reduction in compressed air consumption of 63%! How much does this equate to in $$$? A reasonable average of cost to generate compressed air is about $0.25/ 1000 SCF. Let’s assume just a 40hr workweek:

88.4 SCFM x 60 mins x $0.25/1000 SCF = $1.33/hr

$1.33 x 40hr workweek = $53.20 USD

$53.20 x 52 weeks/year = $2,766.40 USD in yearly savings

The 2019 list price on a Model 110018 Super Air Knife is $397.00. By replacing the homemade solution with an 18” Super Air Knife, the return on investment is just over 38 working days of an 8-hr shift. If your plant runs multiple shifts, or works on weekends, it pays for itself even quicker.

Not only are these homemade solutions expensive to operate, they’re not safe either. Familiarize yourself with both OSHA 29 CFR 1910.95(a) and 29 CFR 1910.242(b) and you’ll learn just how expensive it can be if you were to be found using these devices during a random OSHA inspection. Make sure you’re utilizing the most expensive utility as efficiently and safely as possible. If you need help with determining which products are best suited for your application, give us a call. Our team of Application Engineers is ready to help!

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@EXAIR.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

Watch EXAIR Webinars On-Demand

That’s right, just like your local cable or satellite TV provider, EXAIR offers On-Demand content that can be streamed and used for training, education, help with cost justification, or improve awareness around compressed air costs and safety.

The best part about this content is that you don’t have to pay for it, simply register on our website (where your information is not shared) and go to the Webinars section of our Knowledge Base.  Then gain access to the library of five webinars that have all been broadcast around compressed air safety, efficiency, and optimization.

EXAIR.com – Webinars On-Deman

The current On-Demand offering is listed below:

Intelligent Compressed Air Solutions for OSHA Compliance
Intelligent Solutions for Electrical Enclosure Cooling
Optimize Your Compressed Air System in 6 Simple Steps
Simple Steps for Big Savings
Understanding Static Electricity

The most recent webinar we created is currently only On-Demand for registered attendees and will soon be added to the Knowledge Base library.  If you did not get to see it live, the content was extremely helpful for anyone that works within a facility that uses compressed air.  Use This Not That – 4 Common Ways To Save Compressed Air In Your Plant, keep an eye out for the release date in our On-Demand section.

If you would like to discuss any of the webinar topics further, please feel free to reach out to an Application Engineer.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF