Does a 38 Day Simple ROI Sound Good? Use Engineered Compressed Air Blowoff Products!

After getting a baseline measurement of the air consumption in your facility and locating and fixing leaks in your system, it’s time to begin implementing some changes. Step 3 of the 6 Steps to Optimizing Your Compressed Air System covers upgrading your blowoff, cooling, and drying operations using engineered compressed air products.

sixsteps_3

This step can have the most impact when it comes to your bottom line. The energy costs associated with the generation of compressed air make it one of the most expensive utilities for any industrial environment. Because of this, we need to ensure that the places in your facility that are using compressed air are doing so efficiently.

EXAIR manufactures a variety of products that can help to ensure you’re using your compressed air in the best way possible. What it may seem simple, easy, and cheap to use something like an open-ended pipe or tube for blowoff, the fact of the matter is that the volume of air that these homemade solutions use quickly make them more expensive. Super Air Nozzles have been designed to entrain ambient air along with the supplied compressed air, allowing you to achieve a high force from the output of the nozzle while keeping compressed air usage to a minimum. In addition to saving air, they’ll also provide a significant reduction in overall sound level.

drilled pipe
homemade drilled pipe

Another product that can be used to increase the efficiency of your blowoff processes is the Super Air Knife. Available in lengths ranging from 3”-108” and in a variety of materials, the Super Air Knife is the ideal replacement for inefficient drilled pipes. Again, it may seem cheaper to just drill a few holes in a pipe whenever you need to cover a wide area but the volume of air consumed in addition to the incredibly high sound level will quickly drain your compressor. The Super Air Knife is also designed to entrain ambient air, at a rate of 40:1! Allowing you to take advantage of the free ambient air in addition to the supplied air.

Let’s compare the costs difference between a homemade drilled pipe and EXAIR’s Super Air Knife. The Super Air Knife has a precisely set air gap across the full length of the knife, allowing for an efficient and quiet laminar airstream. When compared to a drilled pipe, the air consumption is dramatically reduced as is the sound level. For example, let’s take an 18” section of drilled pipe, with 1/16” diameter holes spaced out every ½”. At 80 PSIG, each hole consumes 3.8 SCFM. With a total of 37 holes, this equates to a total of 140.6 SCFM.

3.8 SCFM x 37 = 140.6 SCFM

A Super Air Knife, operated at 80 PSIG with .002” stock shim installed will consume a total of 2.9 SCFM per inch of knife. An 18” SAK would then consume just 52.2 SCFM.

2.9 SCFM x 18 = 52.2 SCFM

140.6 SCFM – 52.2 SCFM = 88.4 SCFM saved 

Replacing an 18” drilled pipe with a Super Air Knife represents a total reduction in compressed air consumption of 63%! How much does this equate to in $$$? A reasonable average of cost to generate compressed air is about $0.25/ 1000 SCF. Let’s assume just a 40hr workweek:

88.4 SCFM x 60 mins x $0.25/1000 SCF = $1.33/hr

$1.33 x 40hr workweek = $53.20 USD

$53.20 x 52 weeks/year = $2,766.40 USD in yearly savings

The 2019 list price on a Model 110018 Super Air Knife is $397.00. By replacing the homemade solution with an 18” Super Air Knife, the return on investment is just over 38 working days of an 8-hr shift. If your plant runs multiple shifts, or works on weekends, it pays for itself even quicker.

Not only are these homemade solutions expensive to operate, they’re not safe either. Familiarize yourself with both OSHA 29 CFR 1910.95(a) and 29 CFR 1910.242(b) and you’ll learn just how expensive it can be if you were to be found using these devices during a random OSHA inspection. Make sure you’re utilizing the most expensive utility as efficiently and safely as possible. If you need help with determining which products are best suited for your application, give us a call. Our team of Application Engineers is ready to help!

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@EXAIR.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

FREE EXAIR Webinar – November 2nd, 2017 @ 2:00 PM EDT

On November 2, 2017 at 2 PM EDT, EXAIR Corporation will be hosting a FREE webinar titled “Optimizing Your Compressed Air System In 6 Simple Steps”.

During this short presentation, we will explain the average cost of compressed air and why it’s important to evaluate the current system. Compressed air can be expensive to produce and in many cases the compressor is the largest energy user in a plant, accounting for up to 1/3 of the total energy operating costs. In industrial settings, compressed air is often referred to as a “fourth utility” next to water, gas and electric.

Next we will show how artificial demand, through operating pressure and leaks, can account for roughly 30% of the air being lost in a system, negatively affecting a company’s bottom line. We will provide examples on how to estimate the amount of leakage in a system and ways to track the demand from point-of-use devices, to help identify areas where improvements can be made.

To close, we will demonstrate how following six simple steps can save you money by reducing compressed air use, increasing safety and making your process more efficient.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

Step 2 of Optimizing Your Compressed Air System, Find & Fix Leaks

Over the past handful of blog posts I have blogged about topics like understanding the demand on your compressor, creating a system pressure profile,  and the effectiveness of filtering your compressed air.  These are all critical steps in ensuring your compressed air system is optimized for maximum efficiency.   These can also all fall into place with our Six Steps To Compressed Air Optimization.

EXAIR Six Steps To Optimizing Your Compressed Air System
EXAIR Six Steps To Optimizing Your Compressed Air System

Another factor in the six steps is identifying and addressing leaks within your system.   Finding leaks in your compressed air system can be done several ways, one of the oldest methods is to use a soap and water mixture to spray on every joint and see if there is a leak that causes bubbles.   The next method would be to use ball valves and pressure gauges to test each run of pipe to ensure they are holding their pressure over a period of time, similar to a leak down test.  The final method, and by far the easiest, would be to utilize our Ultrasonic Leak Detector.

This can be used to sense leaks in compressed air systems up to 20′ away and can also pin point a leak by closely monitoring each joint.  Neal Raker made a great video on how to use the Ultrasonic Leak Detector a while back and it is shown below.

If you have any questions on how to find leaks or how to optimize your compressed air system, give us a call.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Step 1: Understanding The Demand On Your Compressor

The Six Steps To Optimizing Your Compressed air System are all based from the demand side of your compressed air system.   These all lead to saving money by reducing the energy demanded from your supply side of the system. The first step in understanding your demand side is to figure out how much compressed air is currently asked for and why are you asking the supply side for that air. This will allow you to gather information on where the savings are possible in order to make educated adjustments within your compressed air system.

So you would first want to start documenting your demand with a Usage Chart.   You will want to start a spreadsheet that has each point of compressed air use and quantify the volumetric flow, as well as operating pressure of the compressed air products in your system.  You will want to start at your compressor and follow the compressed air lines in to each drop that has a point of use, whether it is a Safety Air Gun being used by an operator, or a Super Ion Air Knife that is automated inside of the machine.  An example of the Usage Chart is below

Demand Chart

One note to add is that you can break the demand column into several different columns in case you have a variable demand location, such as a Non-Hazardous Purge Cabinet Cooler System where there is always a slight demand, but then there is a short burst peak demand when the enclosure needs to be cooled.

Once you have all of the point of use devices mapped out and charted on your Usage Chart, you can then begin to look at the areas you have for improvement.  For example, if you only have one location that needs a 5 psig higher pressure than everything else in the plant, that would be an ideal location to look at why you need the higher pressure.   If you can reduce your system pressure by 5 psig then you will save on average, 2.5% of the electricity used to drive your compressor.

If you see that you have a few areas with similar point of use devices but the usage is higher, then that is a prime location to start inspecting for leaks, a tool like the Ultrasonic Leak Detector makes this part easier than using soapy water to spray down each joint in a pipe.   On the same note, if you are able to reduce your system pressure by 5 psig then that is also going to reduce the amount of leakage throughout the system.

In order to determine what the usage of each point of use device can also easily be viewed and even recorded using one of our Digital Flowmeters w/ Summing Remote Display and Data Logger.   This device is offered in a range of sizes 1/2″ to 6″ iron pipe or copper pipe.

If you want to take the first step in optimizing your compressed air system and ensure that you are saving as much air as possible while compressing the least amount demanded by your system then feel free to contact us.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Back To The Basics (of compressed air)…And The Track

The past several weeks I have been finding myself doing things the more complicated way (I  know how that sounds odd – an engineer that prefers to do things the hard way). Over the weekend I took a brief ride on the motorcycle for a short 15 minute trip that I found to be satisfying, even if it is less direct and a more out-of-the-way route for getting my errands complete.   The route runs past the local university of Mount Saint Joseph, down a winding road that has no houses and only one business, the rest is all woods and a creek.  Finally, this route runs along the mighty Ohio river and back up a steep winding road near my house.

While I have been worrying about all the projects and errands which need to be completed, this more complicated route gives me a moment to decompress and remember that my family at home and few other things are all I need.  Once  I was reminded of that and got some perspective which allowed me to “keep calm and carry on” I proceeded to break my projects and errands down into smaller pieces and everything will start to come together.

I now have a to do list at home as well as a refreshed list at EXAIR of all the items I need to do.   The list at home is considerably more fun as it all involves getting my “new to me” track bike ready for this season.  20140506_134512That’s right, it’s right around the corner, the first track weekend of 2014.  So expect to see some more motorcycle blogs coming and hopefully more ways to use EXAIR products while working on them. It was these newly developed lists that helped me reorganize and get back on track for the new season, sometimes a list is necessary in order to gain perspective, prioritize and begin to take action.

On that note, EXAIR has a list to help you gain perspective, prioritize and take some action toward getting your compressed air system optimized. Our systematic approach using the Six Steps To Compressed Air Optimization has been developed to help you save your compressed air,your hearing, and your money. By following these steps you can lower your compressed air use, minimize workplace noise exposure (OSHA will be happy) and save money on this important utility.

6 steps

 

If you have ever thought of reducing your compressed air costs, use our list to help you gain perspective on this simple process and take some positive steps toward saving your facility some money.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF