Even Our Customers Are Sending “Holiday Gifts”

Lately, it certainly has felt like Christmas here at the factory.  Two customers sent in some sample parts  for us to test and provide solutions for their application issues.  Opening the box is like unwrapping a present, what surprise will we find inside?

The first customer currently uses the Line Vac to convey (3) different parts from the floor to a hopper for the assembly process.  (2) of the (3) parts transfer very well, but the third conveys a little too slowly. Having all three parts here at EXAIR allows us to set up testing and determine what the root cause is and recommend a solution that will work equally well for all three parts.

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The second is interested in our vacuum technologies to pick and place some fiber board material products.  Due to the curved surfaces and porous material, getting a good vacuum could be a challenge. By having the sample parts here, we can utilize our Demo Room, and try various E-Vacs with various vacuum cup designs and possibly the Line Vac or Air Amplifiers  to develop a good suction on each item.

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When it isn’t possible to send in samples, we will stand behind the EXAIR Unconditional Guarantee – purchase a stocked catalog item, and you have 30 days to try it your facility, in your process, under your real world conditions.  If after the 30 days you aren’t satisfied, send it back for a full refund – and try something else!

To discuss your application and find out information about sending in material samples to confirm that an EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air Product can help your process, feel free to contact EXAIR and one of our Application Engineers can help you determine the best solution.

Brian Bergmann
Application Engineer

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Priming the Pump

Yesterday, I had the opportunity to talk to a customer who was looking to prime a pump to remove a liquid out of an 8 foot deep tank.  He was pulling in the liquid through 1 1/2″ pipe and wanted to prime the pump in 5 seconds.  This was an interesting application for me, because it had some tangible numbers for the design.  In most applications with the E-Vac Vacuum Generators, a customer needs to lift something heavy and they need the job done fast. Those terms are very subjective, and we have to try and prognosticate what vacuum generator will work for the customer. Yesterday was different, the customer had some really defined limits, and I knew what I needed to do in order to satisfy the application.  The engineer in me was very happy with the situation.

Let’s start with the parameters.  He was looking to lift water 8 feet vertically.  8 feet of water corresponds to 7.06 inches of mercury.  The porous E-Vac can generate vacuum up to 21 inches of mercury and the non-porous E-vacs can generate 27 inches of mercury, so all of the E-Vac models can easily draw the liquid up the 8 feet of piping.  This is where most vacuum generator applications stop, but not this one.  If time is not a concern the 800001 will use the least amount of air (1.5 SCFM @ 80 PSIG of inlet) and get the job done, but how long will it take?

This is where you need to use the evacuation charts, from EXAIR.com. Below are two charts from the “Specs” tab for Inline E-Vacs.

E-Vac porous evacuation time

Non-porous Evacuation time

The 1 1/2″ Pipe that is 8 ft. long has volume of around .1 cubic foot.  We need to generate at least a 7.06 inches of mercury, so we will look at the 9 inches of mercury column. It will take the 810002 17.85 seconds to evacuate 1 cubic foot of pipe.  The 800001 will take 14.40 seconds to evacuate the same volume, and  it will use less air.  We will want to use the porous vacuum generator, because we don’t need a very high vacuum to get the job done. If the 800001 can evacuate 1 cubic foot in 14.40 seconds it should be able to evacuate .1 cubic foot in 1.44 seconds which is easily fast enough for the customer.  The math also told us the customer could use up to 27.7 feet of hose to lift up that 8 feet, if he needed to take a non linear path.  If we know that the customer needed to move the fluid more that 27.7 feet, we could move up to the next vacuum generator to get the job done faster, but it was not necessary in this application.

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer
Davewoerner@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_DW

Vacuum Generators: Porous Vs. Non-Porous

I had customer call this week who was using an E-Vac model 800008H, an 8 SCFM Porous Vacuum Generator, to pull a vacuum on four vacuum cups.  He was trying to lift a part with the four vacuum cups placed on a clean metal portion of the part.  Unfortunately he was having a little trouble.  He had to lift the product very slowly because the part could easily be dislodged, if the part was bumped or came to an abrupt stop.

In-LineE-VacFamily

EXAIR’s family of In-Line E-Vac vacuum generators

The problem is a relatively simple one.  The customer choose a porous vacuum generator when he would be better served with a non-porous unit.  The vacuum cups are attaching to a non-porous surface, sheet metal, in a relatively clean environment.  The difference between porous and non-porous units is that  porous units has more vacuum flow available at a low vacuum level, where the non-porous vacuum generators have a higher level of vacuum, but less vacuum flow.  Because of the high vacuum flow, a porous unit is much better for lifting porous materials like cardboard, some particle boards, and fabrics.  The higher vacuum flow of porous vacuum generators helps maintain the vacuum when pulling upon materials which let a constant flow of air through. In the customer’s case, he was lifting a clean sheet of metal, a non-porous material, and needed a higher vacuum level as opposed to a higher vacuum flow. A higher vacuum level [more inches of mercury (Hg) of vacuum] would pull harder upon the metal and hold it tighter.

Let’s look at the customer’s example more closely.  An EXAIR model 800008, porous E Vac, will generate a maximum of 21 inches of mercury (“Hg).  A model 810008, non-porous E Vac, will generate 27  inches of mercury (“Hg).  Let say he was using a 900758 3 1/4” diameter round vacuum cup. If you look at the Vacuum Lift Chart, you see that the 900758 can lift 42.8 lbs. at 21 “HG, but it can lift 55.0 pounds at 27 “HG of mercury.  So in this application the customer can increase their lifting capacity by 28.5% by switching from a non-porous vacuum generator to a porous vacuum generator.

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer
davewoerner@exair.com
@EXAIR_DW

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