Types of Air Amplifiers: Amplify Volume or Amplify Pressure

EXAIR Air Amplifiers use a small amount of compressed air to create a tremendous amount of air flow.

As Application Engineers, we help many customers with finding solutions with effective, safe, and efficient EXAIR products.  But, in some instances, we get a request for an air amplifier to increase line pressures.  EXAIR does not manufacture this type of Air Amplifier.  In doing some research on the internet, I was able to find two different types of air amplifiers.  In this blog, I will describe the difference between the pressure-type and volume-type.

The EXAIR Super Air Amplifiers are defined as a volume-type of an amplifier.  They use compressed air to generate a large volume of air flow.  The amplification ratio is the comparison between the inlet air flow and the outlet air flow.  With the EXAIR Super Air Amplifiers, we can reach an amplification ratio of 25 to 1.  They use a Coanda profile with a patented shim to create a low pressure to draw in a large volume of the surrounding air.  EXAIR manufactures a variety of different sizes, materials, and types.  But they all do the same thing, amplify the volume of air.  To give an example, model 120024 Super Air Amplifier has a 25:1 amplification ratio.  It uses 29.2 SCFM (826 SLPM) of compressed air at 80 PSIG (5.5 bar).  So, the outlet air flow is amplified from 29.2 SCFM to 730 SCFM (20,659 SLPM) of air.  This large volume of air works great for cooling, exhausting, and transferring.  But, with any type of amplification, you have to lose something.  With the volume type Air Amplifiers, the outlet pressure is reduced dramatically.

The pressure-type air amplifiers are different from the Super Air Amplifiers as this device will amplify the outlet air pressure, not the volume.  It is an air pump that has a direct dual piston that uses two different diameters.  The larger diameter uses the drive inlet pressure while the smaller diameter is used for the boost pressure.  The amplification ratio is determined by the difference in volume from the drive piston to the boost piston.  They also come in a variety of ranges and sizes.  As an example, an amplification ratio of 15:1 will increase an inlet pressure from 100 PSI (7 bar) to an outlet pressure of 1,500 PSI (103 bar).  Since the pressure-type air amplifier is an air pump, the system has to cycle.  To do this, they use pilot valves to either add the inlet compressed air to the drive piston or to relieve the air pressure from the drive piston.  This cycling portion of the operation does reduce the efficiency of the air amplifier.  The pressure-type air amplifiers are used to generate high pressure for a specific application or area and eliminate the purchase of a high-pressure air compressor.  The applications include air clamps and presses, pressure testing, air brakes, and also blow molding.  Like stated above about losing something with amplifications, the volume of air is reduced dramatically.  Generally, a reservoir tank and over-sizing will be needed for a good system.

The Application Engineers at EXAIR enjoy talking to customers about compressed air applications.  If you need more information about Air Amplifiers, you can contact us directly.  We can explain the volume-type that we manufacture or refer you to a company that makes the pressure-type.  Either way, we will be happy to hear from you.

John Ball
Application Engineer
Email: johnball@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_jb