Non Hazardous Purge Cabinet Cooler System Keeps Enclosure Dust Free

A mining company has processing machinery operating in a poorly ventilated, dusty environment (actually, it’s a mine…as you might have guessed.) This machine’s control panel was supplied with filtered vents and fans to cool the electronic components inside. The filters clog regularly, and even though they checked them frequently, it’s not always frequently enough to prevent the drive from overheating.

Based on a referral they got from another one of their facilities, they called to get more information on a Cabinet Cooler System. For total dust exclusion, our Non-Hazardous Purge systems are ideal…they’re thermostatically controlled, so compressed air consumption is responsible and efficient, but they also provide a small, continuous flow, even when the thermostat set point temperature is attained, and the solenoid valve is shut. This keeps a low positive purge volume of clean, dry air in the enclosure.

EXAIR Non Hazardous Purge Cabinet Cooler Systems provide reliable and efficient cooling in the most aggressive environments.

The caller already had the data from our Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide, so specification was quick & easy. A Model NHP4340 NEMA 12 Non-Hazardous Purge Cabinet Cooler System – 2,800 Btu/hr – w/Thermostat Control was ordered and installed the next day. We keep them in stock for situations just like this.

If you have heat issues with electrical & electronic equipment enclosures, give me a call.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
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Super Air Amplifiers for Cooling Injection Mold

When working with a cooling application, many customers will immediately look to the Vortex Tube and Cold Gun product lines. While this may be the best solution for some applications with smaller areas to cool, cold air from a Vortex tube based solution is not the best method for large parts or larger areas that exceed a footprint of approximately 2″ x 2″. For larger areas, we have other options for many cooling applications. EXAIR’s Super Air Amplifiers and Super Air Knives are also very effective at reducing the temperature of a part without requiring cold air.

Cooling is a relative concept based on the starting and finishing temperature. What feels “cool” to a human being does not necessarily mean the same thing as “cooling” a part or material. Due to the ability of the Super Air Knives and Super Air Amplifiers to entrain large amounts of ambient temperature air, we can move a lot of air volume across the surface of the target part and quickly lower the temperature.

A simple example I like to use is blowing on a hot cup of coffee just as its been brewed. The temperature of the air coming from your mouth is around 98.6°F, the same as your body temperature. Coffee can be as hot as 185°F when fresh. Due to the temperature differential between your breath and the hot coffee, we’re able to achieve a reasonable amount of cooling just by simply blowing across the surface. Typically, when the target temperature of the part or material needs to be around ambient temperature or higher; the best solution for cooling is going to be either a Super Air Amplifier or Super Air Knife.

Rob's I phone 877

EXAIR 5015 Cold Gun

To illustrate the above concept even more, recently I was working with a customer that needed to cool a silicon injection mold. The mold had two sides and the customer was looking for a method of cooling it down between cycles. The mold cavity surface was approximately 400°F and they wanted to get it down to around 150°F. They were familiar with the EXAIR Cold Gun as they use them across their facility in various secondary or post-molding drilling operations. They had a spare and decided to hook it up and blow the cold air across the face of the mold to see what happens. The volume of air from the Cold Gun was not enough to sufficiently cool the entire mold, so he reached out to EXAIR for assistance.

Based on the dimensions of the mold and understanding the target temperature to be 150°F, we settled on a system of (2) 120224 4” Super Air Amplifier Kits. One was placed above each side of the mold. As soon as the mold opened, they activated the Super Air Amplifiers and were able to pull the surface temperature of the mold down to an acceptable level. Time is money in any manufacturing operation. Companies that produce injection molded parts will look for any way to improve their process. By implementing a procedure to cool the mold more quickly, they are able to boost their productivity gains and become more profitable.

The Super Air Amplifier Kit comes with an Auto-Drain Filter to keep the air clean and dry, a pressure regulator to allow you to dial in the precise level of airflow, and a shim set that allows you to make gross adjustments to the flow. The Super Air Amplifier is available in (5) different sizes with ¾” up to 8” diameter outlets and flow rates from 219 SCFM to 9,000 SCFM 6″ from the outlet. They are capable of achieving an amplification ratio of up to 25:1 from the compressed air supply. The laminar airflow from the unit minimizes wind shear to produce sound levels that are typically three times quieter than other air movers. If you have an application that requires a similar type of cooling, give us a call. We’ll walk you through the process of selecting the most suitable solution.

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer

E-mail: Tylerdaniel@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

Keeping Sensitive Equipment Cool with an EXAIR Cabinet Cooler

The image above shows a sophisticated microscope used in a highly controlled environment to monitor living cells.  The end user of this microscope recently contacted the Application Engineering department at EXAIR in search of a method to cool the internal temperature of the microscope chamber from 22°C (72°F) to 14°C (57°F).

The small space of this application made the use of a typical refrigerant based air conditioner an impossibility.  But, near to this microscope is a source of very dry, clean, oil free compressed air – perfect for operating a Cabinet Cooler.

The internal heat load of this application was known by the end user, but the effects of external heat load on the application were still unclear.  In order to determine the full heat load of the application a Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide must be used to perform heat load calculations.  This document, once complete, allows EXAIR to determine both internal and external heat loads, which in turn allows us to determine the required Cabinet Cooler model number.

This application was served by the model 4325 Cabinet Cooler, which allowed for a cooling solution in tight spacing where a traditional air conditioning unit wouldn’t work.  The small and compact design of the Cabinet Cooler was the perfect fit for this customer and application need.  If you have an application in need of a cooling solution, contact an EXAIR Application Engineer.  We’ll be happy to help.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

Camera Lens Cooling with EXAIR Vortex Tubes in a High Temperature Environment

Connection side of camera lens housing. Dimensions shown are in cm.

A customer in Russia contacted our distributor in Moscow about an application to monitor the flow of melted glass.  In their application, the end user had installed (4) camera “eyes” with thermal insulation to instantaneously measure the melted glass flow.  But, the high ambient temperatures would cause the temperature of the camera lens to slowly increase during operation, eventually resulting in an overheating condition.  This overheating condition rendered the cameras inoperable until they were cooled below a temperature of approximately 40°C (104°F).

What this end user (and application) needed was a suitable solution to cool the lens of the camera to a temperature below 40°C (104°F).  A typical refrigerant based air conditioner wouldn’t work for this application due to space and temperature constraints, as the cameras are located close to the furnace with ambient temperatures of 50°C (122°F) or higher.

What did provide a viable solution, however, were High Temperature EXAIR Vortex Tubes.  Suitable for temperatures up to 93°C (200°F), and capable of providing cooling capacities as high as 10,200 BTU/hr., these units fit the bill for this application.

Full view of the camera lens housing. The camera lens is the portion protruding from the far left of the housing.

After determining the volume of compressed air available for each camera, and after discussing the solution options and preferences with the customer, they chose (4) model BPHT3298 Vortex Tubes, using (1) Vortex Tube for each camera.  The cold air from the Vortex Tube will feed directly onto the camera lens, keeping it cool even in the hot ambient conditions.  This removes lost productivity due to machine downtime, which in turn increases output and reliability from the application process.

High Temperature Vortex Tubes provided a solution for this customer when other options were unable to deliver.  If you have a similar application or would like to discuss how an EXAIR Vortex Tube could solve an overheating problem in your application, contact an EXAIR Application Engineer.  We’ll be happy to help.

 

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

Trouble Identifying an EXAIR part? Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered!

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EXAIR Model 3240H Vortex Tube with Hot Muffler Installed

 

Not a day goes by that we don’t receive a call from a customer that is having trouble identifying an EXAIR part. Due to the robust nature of our Vortex Tubes, they can be installed in applications for several years without any maintenance. When the time comes to expand that line, the labels may have worn off, the unit may be covered in grime or oil, or the personnel that originally ordered the product may no longer be with the company. In any case, one of the Application Engineers here at EXAIR will certainly be able to help!

I recently received an e-mail from a gentlemen in Indonesia who was suffering from that very problem. They had a Model 3240 Vortex Tube installed in a camera cooling application near a boiler. The engineer who designed the project was no longer with the company and they could not determine a Model number or when they had purchased it. They saw the EXAIR sticker, along with our contact information, and reached out for help. Vortex Tube’s come in different sizes, based on the available compressed air supply as well as the level of refrigeration needed. They’re available in (3) different sizes as well as Vortex Tubes for max refrigeration (R style generators) and Vortex Tubes for a maximum cold temperature (C style generators). In order to identify the Model number, you must look on the shoulder of the Vortex Tube generator. On it, there will be a stamp that indicates the generator style that is installed. In this case, the customer stated that there was a “40-R”, indicating to me that he had our Model 3240 Vortex Tube.

Our team of highly trained Application Engineers is here ready to assist you with any needs you may have regarding EXAIR products. With a little bit of investigative work, a quick discussion about the dimensions or a photo; we’re able to identify any of our products. If you’re considering expanding a current line into other parts of your facility, or perhaps adding a new location and need help identifying your EXAIR products; give an Application Engineer a call and we’ll be sure you get the right products on order!

Tyler Daniel

Application Engineer

Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

E-mail: tylerdaniel@exair.com

Music And The Mini Cooler

Recently, EXAIR Corporation offered CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) training to employees. I already carry certification, so I held down the fort while some of the other Application Engineers received this training. As a middle aged man, I have to admit that my interest in my co-workers’ abilities to respond to a matter of this nature is not entirely unselfish.

One of the key parts of CPR training is the rate of the chest compressions. While most people couldn’t accurately replicate 100 beats per minute on demand, almost everyone is familiar enough with some popular songs with a rhythm close to that.  The song they always bring up in CPR training is “Stayin’ Alive” by the Bee Gees. Depending on how you feel about disco, another option is “Another One Bites The Dust” by Queen. Pro tip: it might be considered bad form to sing that one out loud while performing CPR.

Speaking of music, while I was holding down said fort during this morning’s training session, I had the pleasure of assisting a caller in the music business: a piano restoration & tuning professional. A frequent job for them consists of resetting tuning pins, which requires drilling numerous small holes (a grand piano can have as many as 250) into a hardwood board. They’re pressed in, so it’s critical that they fit the newly-drilled hole precisely. If the drill bit gets too hot, it can expand in diameter, making the hole ever-so-slightly bigger than it should be. The heat can also cause the surface of the hole ID to glaze. Both of those things can cause problems with the pin fitting securely in the hole.

The EXAIR Model 3808 Mini Cooler System was an ideal solution – it’ll keep the drill bit cool & clean with a constant stream of cold air. It’s compact and quiet, and only uses 8 SCFM @100psig…well within the capacity of many smaller air compressors.

If you’d like to “get in tune” with a spot cooling solution, I can help…call me. Oh, and in case you wanted to know which song with about 100 beats per minute I’d use for CPR:

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
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EXAIR Cabinet Cooler System Meets High Demands Of Sea Duty

I joined the Navy, right after high school, to get out of Ohio, see the world, and never come back. “My recruiter said” (if you are considering military service, those can be famous last words, just so you know) that I would be a good candidate for Nuclear Power School, so I took the test. As a math & science nerd scholar, I qualified for admission easily.  About halfway through Nuke School, I volunteered for submarines.  My decision was based in no small part on the sea stories of our instructors, the strong reputation of better food, and my deep appreciation for the movie “Operation Petticoat.”

Upon graduation, I was assigned to a new construction Trident submarine.  I did not see the world…I saw the Electric Boat shipyard in Groton, Connecticut, and Naval Submarine Base King’s Bay, Georgia.  Hilarity occasionally ensued, but never in the context of that movie I so adored.  I moved back to Ohio (on purpose) soon after my enlistment was up.  The food WAS good…I can unreservedly vouch for that.

In the new construction environment of the shipyard, I became quite familiar, and developed a deep respect for, the high level of attention paid to the materials and workmanship that a seagoing vessel demanded…not to mention, one with a nuclear reactor on board.  Reliability and durability are obviously key factors.

I had the pleasure recently of assisting an electrical contractor who was looking for a cooling solution for a new Variable Frequency Drive enclosure installation on a cement barge.  The ship’s engineer (a Navy veteran himself) had told the contractor that his priorities were reliability, durability, and dust exclusion.  He couldn’t have made a better case for an EXAIR Cabinet Cooling System.

Based on the specified heat load of the VFD, the size of the enclosure, and its location, a Model 4380 Thermostat Controlled NEMA 12 Cabinet Cooler System, rated at 5,600 Btu/hr, was specified.  This equipment is internal to the ship; had it been exposed to the elements, a NEMA 4X system would have been presented.

Up to 2,800 Btu/hr cooling capacity with a single Cabinet Cooler System (left) or as much as 5,600 Btu/hr with a Dual system (right.)

EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Systems have no moving parts to wear, no electric motor to burn out, and no heat transfer surfaces (like a refrigerant-based unit’s fins & tubes) to foul.  Once it’s properly installed on a sealed enclosure, the internal components never see anything but cold, clean air.

If you have a need to protect an electrical enclosure in aggressive environment, give me a call.  With a wide range of Cabinet Cooler Systems to meet a variety of needs, we’ve got the one you’re looking for, in stock and ready to ship.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
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