EXAIR’s New Cabinet Cooler® System Calculator

For the longest time we have been using this form on EXAIR.com to get the information we needed to manually calculate the internal and external heat loads and ultimately make a recommendation on which Cabinet Cooler System would be best for that application! Typically it would take thirty minuets to an hour to get a email back from a application Engineer!

While the manual Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide worked great (and we will still reply within 24 hours), we have been racking our heads over here to better that process and get you a solution faster than ever! Now you type in your information and you have a recommendation and a link to that product on the website where you can learn more or place an order! So you can go from form to order in less than 5 Minuets!!!! Check it Out HERE!!

By providing certain information like size of the enclosure, NEMA rating needed, and environmental conditions, this new calculator will sort through our large selection of ready-to-ship Cabinet Cooler® Systems and provide instant feedback on the best model number for any applicable electrical enclosure.  Taking the guess work out of the equation, EXAIR’s Calculator ensures the customer that they can be confident in selecting the correct product for their unique specifications. You can even Print the form for your records!

Cabinet Cooler Calculator

            EXAIR’s complete line of Cabinet Cooler systems include 120V AC, 240V AC and 24V DC thermostat voltage, continuous operation, type 316 stainless steel and high temperature models – all of which are selectable with the new calculator. Find this new tool on the website EXAIR.com, in the Knowledge Base Calculators, along with many other resources, such as the CAD Library and Application Database, which also help customers choose a perfect solution. Cabinet Cooler systems start at $534. https://www.exair.com/knowledgebase/calculator-library/cabinet-cooler-system-calculator.html

Jordan Shouse
Application Engineer

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Cabinet Cooler® System Calculator – EXAIR’s Latest Do-It-Yourself Tool!

At EXAIR we are constantly moving, changing, growing, and building products and tools to help anyone that comes into contact with us or our products. Evidence of this includes our continued launches of new product and tools that you can see in our Press Releases. Our newest tool provides a do-it-yourself solution to determine which Cabinet Cooler System model number your electrical or control panel will need. This easiest way to reach this new tool is to follow our websites Resource’s button to the Calculator Library. We have made the selection process easier and faster with this new calculator.

Historically, the Cabinet Cooler sizing guide was the fastest way to receive a recommendation – But now, the calculator provides a do-it-yourself solution with instant feedback!

While we have always offered the ability to fill out a Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide (above) and email, call, chat or fax the information to us. With the right amount of information provided, an e-mail will provide you an answer within 24 hours. With a phone call or online chat, we can get you an answer in 5-10 minutes. But now you can receive instant feedback as to which Cabinet Cooler System is needed to combat an overheating cabinet by using the Cabinet Cooler Calculator. We have poured our knowledge and experience from over the years into the tool to best fit to our standards of correctly calculating and compensating for diverse environments and demands of electrical panels.

With some basic information on the panel, environment, and compressed air available, the calculator will calculate the internal heat load, external heat load, compensate for non-optimal compressed air temperature or pressure, and solar heat load(where applicable) then show the exact model number needed to reach the desired temperature for the panel. You can then immediately learn more about that specific model or order that model online. Of course you can also reach out to anyone here at EXAIR and receive answers to additional questions and or place the order with an actual person.

If you want to discuss your overheating panels or if you have some questions on why we are asking for certain variables on the Cabinet Cooler Calculator, feel free to contact us.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Radiant Heat- Where Does It Come From

Even in extremely aggressive environments, EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Systems provide reliable heat protection for your sensitive electronics and controls.

The three types of heat transfer have been discussed here and there on this blog before. One of the most common heat transfer methods that I deal with on a day to day basis is radiant heat transfer. Also known as thermal radiation, the process is actually the exchange of energy by photons. The main difference separating radiant heat from convection and conduction is that radiation does not require there to be a medium to permit propagation of the heat. Any item which contains thermal energy, meaning it is above absolute zero and less than 1,000 Kelvin, will have this thermal energy. This thermal energy is radiated to other items causing a transfer of heat energy to those objects that results in an equilibrium between the items. The equilibrium does not stop the transfer of photons however.

The most common occurrence that most of us get to experience for radiant heat is heat from the Sun. As the sun shines it is emitting heat. On a hot day, generally the sun is a little closer to your geographic location and you feel hot because the sun is emitting more heat onto your surface than what is being emitted by your internal temperature, so your core temp will increase. On a cold day, when the sun is further away, while it is still shining you feel cold because the sun is not in fact transferring as much energy to the surface of your body than what you are internally generating. The same kind of radiant heat transfer can be from a campfire, open kiln, maybe even a hot steel slab coming out of a blast furnace.

The model 1126SSW 1″ Flat Stainless Steel Super Air Nozzle w/ Swivel Fitting cools a flame sensor within an industrial furnace.

Understanding where a radiant heat source is being generated can help tremendously when looking at cooling an electrical enclosure or even trying to keep a part or sensor cool. Radiant heat is one of the few times a heat shield or shade structure can help to eliminate a portion of the heat load being introduced. Other methods to combat the heat load would be determined with the application at hand. For cooling enclosures that are absorbing a solar heat load, we would look at an EXAIR Cabinet Cooler System and the factors that help to appropriately size the cooler. If this is a single component or part, we would evaluate one of the many other EXAIR Engineered Solutions to determine the best fit for the application. To do either of these, all it takes is a simple chat, email, or call to an Application Engineer.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Heat Transfer – How Energy Can Move

Heat. One word can bring to mind so many different things from cooking to sun tanning. But what is heat and how does it move. Heat is essentially a form of energy that flows in the form of changing temperatures; this form of energy will flow from high to low. When you describe something as being hot, you are actually describing that the item in question has a higher temperature than your hand thus the thermal (heat) energy is flowing from that object to your hand. This phenomenon is what is referred to as heat transfer. Heat transfer can be observed all the way down to the atomic scale with the property known as specific heat. Every molecule and atom can carry a set amount of energy which is denoted by specific heat; this value is the ration of energy (usually in Joules) divided by the mass multiplied by the temperature (J/g°C).

Energy moving through atoms in an object

But how does this heat move from object to object? On the atomic scale, the atoms are storing the energy which will cause electrons to enter into an excited state and rapidly switch between shells. When the electron returns back to a lower shell (closer to the nucleus) energy is released; the energy released is then absorbed by atoms at a lower energy state and will continue until the thermal energy is equal between the two objects. Heat has four fundamental modes of transferring energy from surface to surface and they are as follows:

Advection
Advection is the physical transport of a fluid from point A to point B, which includes all internal thermal energy stored inside. Advection can be seen as one of the simpler ways of heat transfer.

Conduction
Conduction can also be referred to as diffusion and is the transfer of energy between two objects that have made physical contact. When the two objects come into contact with each other thermal energy will flow from the object with the higher temp to the object with the lower temp. A good example of this is placing ice in a glass of water. The temperature is much lower than the room temperature therefore the thermal energy will flow from the water to the ice.

Convection
Convection is the transfer of thermal energy between an object and a fluid in motion. The faster the fluid moves the faster heat is transferred. This relies on the specific heat property of a molecule in order to determine the rate at which heat will be transferred. The low the specific heat of a molecule the faster and more volume of the fluid will need to move in order to get full affect of convection. Convection is used in modern ovens in order to get a more even heat through out the food while cooking.

Radiation
Radiation is the transfer of thermal energy through empty space and does require a material between the two objects. Going back to the how thermal energy is released from atoms; when the electron returns to a lower energy shell the energy is released in the form of light ranging from infrared light to UV light. Energy in the form of light can then be absorbed by an object in the form of heat. Everyone experiences radiation transfer every day when you walk outside; the light from the sun’s radiation is what keeps this planet habitable.

EXAIR’s engineered compressed air products are used every day to force air over hot surfaces to cool, as well as dry and/or blow off hot materials. Let us help you to understand and solve your heat transfer situations.

If you have any questions about compressed air systems or want more information on any of EXAIR’s products, give us a call, we have a team of Application Engineers ready to answer your questions and recommend a solution for your applications.

Cody Biehle
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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The picture “Energy Transfer – Heat” by Siyavula Education is licensed under CC BY 2.0