Super Air Amplifiers vs. Electric Fans

EXAIR’s product offerings contain many products that can be used for cooling. The focus of this blog will be Super Air Amplifiers. These often times get placed in a head to head competition with an electric fan. The best part, they easily come out on top.

Our own Tyler Daniel produced a great video showcasing how efficient it is to cool a part using the Super Air Amplifier rather than a fan.

When looking at the benefits other than performance and rate of cooling due to air entrainment, many customers prefer the Super Air Amplifier due to the fact there are no moving parts. This comes into play when cooling within in a hard to reach area or within a harsh process is needed.  Placing an electric motor with a blade held on by fasteners may not be desirable from a maintenance standpoint. The Super Air Amplifiers do not require electricity, meaning there is not a motor or bearings that would need to be replaced or inspected.

Another benefit is the small footprint of the Super Air Amplifier. This can also be seen within the video above where the Air Amplifier is shown is able to produce 341 SCFM (9,650 SLPM) in amplified airflow.  This gives the ability to place a small unit inside of a chamber that needs large volumes of air flowed through it.  For instance, a rotomolded part that has a large chamber and it needs surfaces to be cooled in order for the part to hold its shape from the mold rather than warp.  This can also be coupled with the fact that a Super Air Amplifier can be ducted on either the suction or discharge side in order to retrieve cool air or move the warm air out of the area.

Speaking of warm, the Super Air Amplifiers are also manufactured to withstand up to 275°F (135°C) from stock.  Stainless Steel and High-temperature models go well beyond that temp, as seen above. Custom-designed (flanges and different materials are common) versions are also available in short lead-times.

If you would like to discuss the benefits to a Super Air Amplifier further, feel free to contact us.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

 

Air Amplifiers Speed Up Cooling Of Cast Parts

Do you like soup? I like soup. Especially on cold days in the winter. Living down south apparently ruined me for cold weather, because, even though I’ve been here in Ohio for 25 years, I still get a chronic chill in early November that won’t let go until about April. March, if I’m lucky. A nice, hot bowl of soup gives me a temporary respite from that dreaded chill, though, so yeah…I like soup.

Sometimes (OK; most of the time) I like it so much I don’t want to wait for it to cool (just slightly) to a temperature that won’t scald my tongue, so I resort to the age-old practice of blowing on those first few spoonfuls. Even though my breath is a fairly consistent 98.6F (give or take,) it’s still quite effective at transferring enough heat out for pain-free consumption. There are two reasons I’m thinking about this right now:

First reason: I’ve been working with an engineer at a large automotive plant…they were cooling a production run of metal cast parts with a series of fans. It ran pretty slowly, and they had a line of those pedestal mounted fans “waving at the parts as they went by.” The thought was, they could direct a stream of cooling air by using the focused flow of an Air Amplifier, and this might just allow them to speed up the line. And they were right. They tried a few Model 6041 1-1/4″ Aluminum Adjustable Air Amplifiers, with very favorable results. So favorable, in fact, that they ordered (40) more to outfit other casting lines in the plant, in arrangements similar to this:

With (16) models to choose from, EXAIR Air Amplifiers are a quick and easy way to provide a tremendous amount of cooling air flow from a compact, lightweight product.
With (16) models to choose from, EXAIR Air Amplifiers are a quick and easy way to provide a tremendous amount of cooling air flow from a compact, lightweight product.

Just like it might take more than one “blow” to cool off a spoonful of soup, they have installed multiple Air Amplifiers, in succession, on the lines, depending on the size, shape, and mass of the part. And the precise adjustability of the Adjustable Air Amplifiers allows them to dial in the optimum air flow, while minimizing their compressed air consumption. So the Production and Facilities folks are all very happy.

And (because I know you’re wondering) the second reason I’m thinking about conductive/convective heat transfer via air movement:

I trust you had already guessed what was for lunch today.
I trust you had already guessed what was for lunch today.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
Find us on the Web
Follow me on Twitter
Like us on Facebook