People of Interest: Daniel Bernoulli – 2/8/1700 to 3/17/1782

Daniel Bernoulli was born in Groningen, Netherlands on February 8, 1700  and was part of a large family heritage of famous mathematicians – His father Johann Bernoulli, one of the first founders of calculus, his uncle Jacob Bernoulli and his older brother Nicolous. When he was only 7 years old, Daniel began to take an interest in mathematics but his father convinced him that there was no financial gain to be had in mathematics and recommended he focus his studies in business instead. Reluctant at first, Daniel would take his father’s advice under the one condition, that his father would tutor him in calculus and his theories of kinetic energy.

At 13 years old, Daniel attended Basel University where he studied logic and philosophy completing his bachelor’s degree by the age of 15 and earning his master’s degree just 1 year later. Over the years, Daniel’s relationship with his father was strained as a result of him plagiarizing his father’s findings. Eventually, his father passed without reconciling with Daniel. At 24, Daniel became a Professor of Mathematics  at a University in Venice but resigned from the position just 9 years later in 1733.

His most recognized mathematical contribution, Bernoulli’s principle, came in 1938 while performing energy conservation experiments, and he published the results in his book entitled Hydrodynamica . He discovered that when fluid travels through a wide pipe into a smaller, more narrow pipe, the fluid begins to move  faster. He determined that the volume or amount of fluid moving through the pipe remains unchanged but will conform to the shape of the pipe or container as it flows. He concluded that the higher the pressure, the slower the flow of the liquid and the lower the pressure, the faster the liquid flow.

The same principle can be applied to air. As air moves around an obstruction or object, it follows the profile of the part and begins to speed up.

Take for example our Super Air Nozzles. The compressed air exits the nozzle through a series of jets which induces a low pressure around the profile of the nozzle, drawing in ambient air. This entrainment of air, up to 25 times or more, results in a high outlet flow at minimal compressed air consumption.

Super Air Nozzle air entrainment

Many of the products offered by EXAIR incorporate this science which can lead to a more efficient operation by lowering compressed air demand ultimately reducing operating costs. To see how our products can help you save money while increasing process performance, contact an Application Engineer for assistance.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

 

Bildnis des Daniel Bernoullius image courtesy of Universitätsbibliothek Leipzig via creative commons license

 

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