Super Air Knife Cleans Baking Pans

A few weeks back I was contacted by a large baking company who was looking for a better way to pre-clean their cake and muffin pans before sending them to a wash cycle. After the pans exit the oven, an operator places the baked goods on a cooling conveyor then uses an air gun to blow out the residual crumbs. The pans are then placed on a separate conveyor and sent through a washer. The manual operation was taking a lot of extra time which resulted in reduced production.

Muffin Pan

After further discussion, I recommended they use our 24″ Super Air Knife. The Super Air Knife produces an even, high velocity curtain of air across the entire length of the knife which would provide a uniform blowoff of the pans, eliminating the manual cleaning.  Super Air Knives are extremely efficient and quiet. Operating at 80 PSIG, using a 40:1 amplification rate of entrained ambient air to compressed air consumed, they require only 2.9 SCFM per inch of knife length while maintaining a low sound level of only 69 dBA and produce a velocity of 11,800 feet per minute.

Efficient way to clean, dry or cool parts, webs or conveyors.

The Super Air Knives are available in lengths from 3″ up to 108″ in single-piece construction and offered in aluminum, 303ss or 316ss construction, they are the perfect choice for small scale or wide coverage blowoff applications. To discuss a particular application or for help selecting the best EXAIR product to fit your need, contact an application engineer at 800-903-9247.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

 

Muffins Anyone? photo courtesy of Amy via creative commons license.

Product Overview: No Drip External Mix Atomizing Spray Nozzles

EXAIR’s Atomizing Nozzles are commonly used to clean, cool or coat parts as well as humidification or to control dust. They are constructed of 303ss, providing superior corrosion resistance and are able to withstand temperature up to 400°F (204°C).

The Atomizing Nozzles are separated into 3 categories – Internal Mix, External Mix and Siphon Fed.

For today’s topic, we will focus on the No Drip External Mix Atomizing Nozzles.

No Drip External Mix Atomizing Nozzles provide the highest flow rates

The External Mix Atomizing Spray Nozzles require a pressurized liquid source and compressed air source to produce a mist of atomized liquid. With the liquid and air being mixed external to the nozzle, they are able to handle higher viscosity fluids above 300 cP.

Our patented No Drip feature positively stops the liquid flow when the supply air pressure drops below 20 PSIG for 1/8″ NPT Nozzles or 30 PSIG for the 1/4″ or 1/2″ NPT. By incorporating this feature into the design, it eliminates the need for any additional valves or supply lines.

Available flow rates range from 2 GPH for our Model # EF9010SS 1/8″ No Drip External Mix Narrow Angle Flat Fan Pattern and up to 303 GPH for the Model # EF6010SS 1/2″ No Drip External Mix Narrow Angle Flat Fan Pattern.

When making a selection, there are 5 common considerations to take into account:

  1. How much liquid flow do I need?
  2. Is the liquid pressurized?
  3. What is the viscosity of the liquid?
  4. How wide of an area needs to be treated?
  5. What type of spray pattern fits the application?

If you have an application requiring a fine mist of atomized liquid or if you’d like to discuss another product or application, contact one of our application engineers for assistance.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

 

 

Intelligent Solutions for Electrical Enclosure Cooling Educational Webinar

Warmer temperatures are quickly approaching, which may seem like a welcome change for personal reasons, but in a processing line, the increased temperatures can wreak havoc on sensitive components found in an electrical control panel.

EXAIR Corporation will be hosting a FREE webinar titled “Intelligent Solutions for Electrical Enclosure Cooling” on May 23, 2018 at 2:00 PM EDT.

(click on the photo to register – it’s FREE!)

By attending this interactive session, you will learn the difference between the 3 most common NEMA ratings for electrical control panels found in an industrial setting, NEMA Type 12, 4 and 4X. We’ll provide examples of traditional, yet unreliable, methods of cooling and the concerns associated with using these types of devices.

Next we will explain how ignoring heat related issues can cause machines to shut down due to failed electrical components, resulting in lost production and increased maintenance costs, negatively affecting a company’s bottom line.

In closing, we’ll show how using an engineered, compressed air operated solution can reduce  downtime by providing a low cost, maintenance-free way to cool and purge control panels with no moving parts.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

Lower Operating Costs by Minimizing Compressed Air Leaks

Almost every industry uses compressed air in some capacity. It is often referred to as the “fourth utility” In an industrial setting, next to water, gas and electric. and in many cases, is the largest energy user in the plant. With an average cost of $ 0.25 per every 1000 Standard Cubic Feet used, compressed air can be expensive to produce so it is very important to use this utility as efficiently as possible. When evaluating the performance of a compressed air system, it’s important to look at the system as a whole.

When you operate point-of-use devices at a higher pressure than necessary to perform a certain job or function, you are creating “artificial demand”. This results in excess air volume being consumed, increasing the amount of energy being lost to waste. For example, plant personnel or operators increase the supply pressure in an effort to improve the end use devices performance. When there is a leak in the system, the line pressure will actually begin to drop and performance begins to deteriorate in other areas in the plant. This not only puts stress on the existing compressor but it also leads to the false idea that a larger or secondary compressor is needed.

Here’s a quick reference on how operating pressure can directly affect operating cost:


Our Model # 1101 Super Air Nozzle requires 14 SCFM @ 80 PSIG. Based on the average operating cost of $ 0.25 per 1000 SCF used, it would cost $ 0.21 per hour to operate this nozzle. (14 SCFM x $ 0.25 x 60 minutes / 1000 SCF = $ 0.21)

If you were able to use the same Model # 1101 Super Air Nozzle operating at only 40 PSIG, while still achieving the desired end result, the air demand would decrease to only 8.1 SCFM, reducing the hourly cost to $ 0.12.  (8.1 SCFM x $ 0.25 x 60 minute / 1000 SCF = $ 0.12)

Don’t waste your money

Leaks in a compressed air system can account for up to 30% of the total operational cost of the compressor, wasting thousands of dollars of electricity per year. Some of the more common places for a leak to occur would be at connection points such as valves, unions, couplings, fittings, etc.

In this table, you will see that a certain amount of air volume is lost through an orifice or opening. If you have several leaks throughout your facility, it isn’t gong to take long for the waste and high operating costs to quickly add up as well as potential increases in repair or maintenance costs for the existing compressor. The industry average shows that any leakage more than 10%, shows there are areas where operational improvements could be made in a compressed air system.

Stay tuned to our blog over the next few weeks as we will discuss how following a few simple steps can help optimize your current compressed air system, in many cases, reducing energy costs related to compressed air waste, leading to a more economical operation.

In the meantime, if you have any questions or would like to discuss a particular application or EXAIR product, give me a call at 800-903-9247.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

 

 

 

 

Product Overview – High Lift Reversible Drum Vac

Are you needing to move a thick fluid, move liquid farther or higher? Do you have a below grade sump or pit you’re looking  to empty? Then EXAIR has the solution for you, enter the High Lift Reversible Drum Vac. Like the standard Reversible Drum Vac, the High Lift RDV is a compressed air operated, liquid only vacuum with no moving parts or motors that can fail,  like those in traditional electrically powered vacuums. What separates the High Lift RDV from the traditional version is the higher vacuum it achieves which allows you to lift liquids up to 15′, move liquids up to 20′ and handle fluids with viscosity as high as 1400 centipoise.

The High Lift Reversible Drum Vac is a high powered vacuum able to lift liquids up to 15′ and fill a 55 gallon drum in less than 85 seconds!

The High Lift Reversible Drum Vac features a two-way pump constructed of stainless steel and a built-in safety relieve valve to avoid over pressurizing or over-filling the drum. Air consumption is minimal, at 43 SCFM @ 80 PSIG, while maintaining a low noise level of only 83 dBA. In “empty” mode, the HLRDV achieves a flow rate of 30 gallons per minute (water) to quickly empty the drum.

Systems are available in 30, 55 and 110 gallon capacities in 3 different variations:

The Standard Systems include the High Lift Reversible Drum Vac, shutoff valve, 20′ vacuum hose, standpipe, 90° quick release elbow and aluminum chip wand.

Model # 6195, 6195-30 and 6195-110

Deluxe Systems include all of the items shown above in the “Standard” System and adds a drum dolly, ABS plastic spill recovery kit, (2) extension wands, crevice tool, skimmer tool and a magnetic tool holder.

Model # 6295, 6295-30

And Premium Systems include all of the items in “Deluxe” Systems and adds the drum with lock ring and lid, heavy duty aluminum tools and 20′ compressed air hose.

Model # 6395, 6395-30, 6935-110

Adjustable Spot Cooler Provides Needed Cooling In Sunglass Lens Manufacturing

A little while back, I worked with a large eyeglass manufacturer on a sunglass lens cooling application. In their setup, they were dry cutting film-coated lenses with a router and after the lenses are cut, they are passed through several different rinse cycles and inspected for scratches or other damage. They were seeing a high number of reject parts and determined that the heat being generated by the tooling, was causing the irregularities. In an effort to alleviate the condition, they used a section of open flexible tubing to blow compressed air at the bit, which helped a little, but they were still concerned with the amount of scrap material.

I recommended they use our Model # 3825 Adjustable Spot Cooler System in the process. The Adjustable Spot Cooler incorporates a Vortex Tube to provide a temperature drop from the incoming supply air temperature. Using the temperature control valve, the exhausting air temperature and flow can be adjusted to fit the application. The system includes a flexible hose to focus the cold air to the desired area until re-positioned. The system also features a magnetic base that allows for easy mounting. By incorporating the filter separator included in the system, they can remove any moisture and/or contaminants in the air supply, relieving any concern with contamination or damage to the part.

Model 3825 Adjustable Spot Cooler System

If you have a cooling application you’d like to discuss or for help selecting the best product to fit your need,  give me a call at 800-903-9247.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

 

sunglasses image courtesy of passer-by via creative common license.

 

People of Interest: Daniel Bernoulli – 2/8/1700 to 3/17/1782

Daniel Bernoulli was born in Groningen, Netherlands on February 8, 1700  and was part of a large family heritage of famous mathematicians – His father Johann Bernoulli, one of the first founders of calculus, his uncle Jacob Bernoulli and his older brother Nicolous. When he was only 7 years old, Daniel began to take an interest in mathematics but his father convinced him that there was no financial gain to be had in mathematics and recommended he focus his studies in business instead. Reluctant at first, Daniel would take his father’s advice under the one condition, that his father would tutor him in calculus and his theories of kinetic energy.

At 13 years old, Daniel attended Basel University where he studied logic and philosophy completing his bachelor’s degree by the age of 15 and earning his master’s degree just 1 year later. Over the years, Daniel’s relationship with his father was strained as a result of him plagiarizing his father’s findings. Eventually, his father passed without reconciling with Daniel. At 24, Daniel became a Professor of Mathematics  at a University in Venice but resigned from the position just 9 years later in 1733.

His most recognized mathematical contribution, Bernoulli’s principle, came in 1938 while performing energy conservation experiments, and he published the results in his book entitled Hydrodynamica . He discovered that when fluid travels through a wide pipe into a smaller, more narrow pipe, the fluid begins to move  faster. He determined that the volume or amount of fluid moving through the pipe remains unchanged but will conform to the shape of the pipe or container as it flows. He concluded that the higher the pressure, the slower the flow of the liquid and the lower the pressure, the faster the liquid flow.

The same principle can be applied to air. As air moves around an obstruction or object, it follows the profile of the part and begins to speed up.

Take for example our Super Air Nozzles. The compressed air exits the nozzle through a series of jets which induces a low pressure around the profile of the nozzle, drawing in ambient air. This entrainment of air, up to 25 times or more, results in a high outlet flow at minimal compressed air consumption.

Super Air Nozzle air entrainment

Many of the products offered by EXAIR incorporate this science which can lead to a more efficient operation by lowering compressed air demand ultimately reducing operating costs. To see how our products can help you save money while increasing process performance, contact an Application Engineer for assistance.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

 

Bildnis des Daniel Bernoullius image courtesy of Universitätsbibliothek Leipzig via creative commons license