EXAIR Line Vacs: Dozens Of Models; Endless Applications

With 119 distinct Models, EXAIR Line Vacs are used to convey everything from down feather to steel shot.  They’re versatile, reliable, durable, and incredibly easy to install and operate.  Consider this list of uses, starting with our smallest Line Vac, and going to our largest:

  • Model 6058 3/8″ Stainless Steel Line Vacs pull mica from a bulk container and spray it into a mold for making decorative stones, to apply a glittery surface.  They used to do it by hand, but the Line Vacs spread it more consistently.
  • A Model 6079 1/2″ Aluminum Line Vac pulls small metal scraps from a metal trimming operation, as they’re cut, keeping the work area clean.
  • Model 130075 3/4″ Light Duty Line Vacs perform a similar function in a plastic cutting machine, conveying away cut chips and eliminating the need for periodically stopping the machine to clean up.
  • A medical device manufacturer saw a 50% increase in productivity when they went from removing flash by hand from molded silicon parts to using a Model 6061 1″ Stainless Steel Line Vac to suction it away automatically.
  • A mining equipment manufacturer reclaims sand from a secondary operation on their green sand molds with a Model 6062 1-1/4″ Stainless Steel Line Vac.  This keeps their mold area clean, and has eliminated waste in production.
  • Model 140125 1-1/4 MNPT Aluminum Threaded Line Vacs eliminated a  “bucket and ladder” operation where cotton seeds needed to be loaded into 7-foot high hoppers.
  • Model 151150 1-1/2 MNPT Heavy Duty Threaded Line Vacs, fitted into black iron pipe systems, reclaim hot metal chips from a deep channel milling machine, automating the transfer to the recycling hopper.  This eliminated the risk of lifting AND burn injuries from the manual handling of the hot chips.
  • Model 6084 2″ Aluminum Line Vacs vacuum trim scrap from custom label making machines to a central scrap bin, keeping the floor clean, and keeping operators from having to empty individual bins at each machine.
  • A Model 6065 2-1/2″ Stainless Steel Line Vac conveys rejected peanuts (identified and segregated by a vision sorting machine) from the catch pan to a large collection hopper.  This is hauled away at the end of each shift, instead of an operator paying constant attention to the catch pan.
  • Model 161300-316 3″ Sanitary Flange Line Vacs replaced mechanical conveyors in a grain mill, incorporating a totally enclosed Clean In Place (CIP) system.  This greatly reduced contamination controls when the product was openly conveyed, and actually increased their conveyance rates of their bulk grains.
  • A Model 6087 4″ Aluminum Line Vac conveys an additive (in pellet form) into an asphalt mixer, replacing an auger conveyor that left product in the hopper and would clog regularly, resulting in messy spills.
  • A company that recycles spent ammo from gun ranges uses a Model 6088 5″ Aluminum Line Vac to convey the granulated rubber backstop material into their truck.  After the ammo is separated, they use the Line Vac to replenish the granulated rubber into the backstop.
  • A Model 130600 6″ Light Duty Line Vac conveys linen squares (mostly 12″ and 24″ square) through the main header of a sorting operation in a commercial laundry facility.  The system also incorporates several Model 120024 4″ Super Air Amplifiers in individual “pickup” branches.
The EXAIR Line Vac is a fast, low cost way to convey most any bulk material.

No matter what kind of bulk material you need to move, EXAIR has a Line Vac product for it.  If you’d like to find out more, give me a call.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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