Compressed Air Uses In Industry

From pneumatic hand tools like impact wrenches or nail guns to larger scale industrial applications like stamping presses, the use of compressed air can be found in almost any industry. In fact, it is often referred to as a “fourth utility” next to water, gas and electric.

Compressed air is used in virtually every industry!

 

Take for example in construction, workers will use a pneumatic riveter to join steel framing because of the power generated by the tool over an electrically powered device, not to mention it provides for a safer operation by removing an electrical hazard. Many companies use compressed air operated diaphragm pumps or air motor driven pumps to move expensive or viscous liquid from one location to another. These types of pumps are self priming drawing the liquid in and provide positive displacement meaning they fill and empty the liquid chamber with the same amount of liquid through a common inlet and outlet.

Amusement parks have used compressed air in some capacity in the operation of thrill rides like roller coasters or to enhance the effect of certain attractions. Compressed air can be found in hospitals where it is used for specialized breathing treatments or to power surgical instruments in an operating room. Educational facilities use compressed air for laboratory testing. You can even find compressed air in the tires on your car. Basically, when you think about it, compressed air is being used just about anywhere.

Here at EXAIR, we manufacture Intelligent Compressed Air Products to help improve the efficiency in a wide variety of industrial operations. Whether you are looking to coat a surface with an atomized mist of liquid, conserve compressed air use and energy, cool an electrical enclosure, convey parts or dry material from one location to another or clean a conveyor belt or web, chances are we have a product that will fit your specific need.

EXAIR has been providing engineered solutions since 1983.

 

To discuss your particular application or for help selecting the best product, contact an application engineer at 800-903-9247 for assistance.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

 

Compressed Air Valves image courtesy of Shane Gorski via creative commons license.

Video Blog: Introducing The EXAIR Drum Cover: Model 6850

Below is a video showcasing the model 6850 Drum Cover.  The Drum Cover is a new product from EXAIR that will help to filter pneumatically conveyed products from the air used to move them.  If you would like to discuss a conveyance application or whether this product would fit your need, please contact an Application Engineer.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer Manager
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Video Blog: How To Increase Line Vac Conveyance Rate By Drilling Out Generator Holes

Here is our latest Application Engineering Video which explains and shows the step-by-step process of increasing performance of a Line Vac in-house. Though EXAIR does have a line of Heavy Duty Line Vac Air Operated Conveyors available from stock, not everyone needs the toughness and superior abrasion resistance they offer. This video shows how to get similar performance from an aluminum or stainless steel Line Vac.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
Find us on the Web http://www.exair.com/28/home.htm
Follow me on Twitter http://www.twitter.com/exair_rb
Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/exair

Excellence Is Not An Act, But A Habit

“We Are What We Repeatedly Do. Excellence, then, is not an Act, But a Habit”

In my twitter feed I often see the aforementioned quote that is attributed to Aristotle. As this blog points out, the quote should really be attributed to Will Durant author of The Story of Philosophy, because it is his interpretation of what Aristotle would have said if he spoke English. While writing this blog I found out Aristotle didn’t really write the quote. In retrospect, clearly he didn’t write, if he did it might look something like this “Είμαστε Τι επανειλημμένα Do. Αριστείας, τότε, δεν είναι μια πράξη, αλλά μια συνήθεια”, but I digress.

Working with customers, resellers and catalog houses, I’m amazed at the different company cultures. Some customers will come to me six months before a project comes up to talk about the applications. They ask us for drawings, specifications, and certifications for the products that we recommend for their applications. They want to analyze all possible scenarios and plan for every eventuality.  These customers greatly appreciate our fully loaded knowledge base and availability of technical information.

Other customers call me for a quote and confirmation. They spent some time online, downloaded a CAD model and created a working plan, but before they pull the trigger, they want to run it by someone else. These customer greatly appreciate the fact that the phones are answered by human beings and we have a fully staffed Application Engineering department with engineers who are always eager to discuss applications and possibilities.

Finally, we have the customers, who I never spoke to before that need a product NOW and are willing to do anything to get. Shipping companies love these customers, because we have our products on the shelves ready to ship, but it will cost you air freight and a flux capacitor to get it there yesterday.

 

At EXAIR, our culture expects excellence. And no matter the kind of customer who contacts us, we know you are all trying to achieve it too – we are just trying to help. When our customer calls in to ask for something yesterday, we will already have it on the shelf ready to go. Unless it is a custom product, our production staff has already machined, built, and tested our product to our excellent standard.  I’m constantly amazed at the effort and continued excellence put out by customer service, engineering, marketing, and production. When the customer calls in to ask for product yesterday, 99.98% of the time I’m able to say that the shipment will be at the dock waiting for the shipping truck by 3:00 PM EST. We can typically do that without an extraordinary effort, because we practice excellent customer service everyday. It’s a habit we are not trying to quit.

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer
DaveWoerner@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_DW

 

 

On the lighter side

Well, it’s almost everyone’s favorite time of the year, swimsuit season!!!. I said ALMOST everyone. Which means that crash diets and “lighter” fare choices are in full swing. (I know I need to be incorporating these myself).

Sticking with this theme, I thought I would write this week’s blog on our Light Duty Line Vac. These units provide an alternative solution for conveying smaller volumes of material over a short distance.

Available in eight common sizes, ¾” up to 6”, in aluminum construction, these units use less compressed air than our other Line Vac products. The Light Duty Line Vac also has no moving parts and requires no electricity to operate, making them virtually maintenance free!

Light Duty Line VacAir consumption is minimal, ranging from our smallest unit consuming 7.30 SCFM @ 80 PSI, up to our largest unit consuming 80.20 SCFM @ 80 PSI.  You can also control the conveying rate by regulating your compressed air supply pressure.

For even more control, you could add one of our Electronic Flow Control (EFC) which uses timing control and a photoelectric sensor to turn off your compressed air when there is no media/part present.

Image

To see our complete line of Air Operated Conveyors, visit our website www.EXAIR.com or if you need assistance with an application, please do not hesitate to contact an application engineer at 1-800-903-9247.

 

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
JustinNicholl@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_JN

Line Vac Troubleshooting / Alumina Ball Conveying

Recently, I had a good interaction with a customer on a Line Vac Application. You can read through the e-mail below to get a better understanding of the issues at work in a typical conveying application.

INQUIRY:
Dear Sir,

We have Line Vac model 6084 operating at between 80 & 90 psig. We are trying to convey alumina balls to a height of about 12 ft. The balls are spherical with diam. between 4 & 7mm (about 1/4 inch). Packed density =50lbs/ ft3 actual density must be in region of 60lbs/ft3. We are only able to convey a very small amount of alumina. Feeding more than a nominal amount blocks the feed tube. Can you please help?

Regards,
Robert

RESPONSE:
Hello Robert,

Yes, I think we have a few ideas you can consider to make the application work a little better.

First thing you must do is to verify with zero doubt about the actual, net operating pressure at the Line Vac inlet. The way you do this is to install a pressure gauge onto a pipe tee and install the pipe tee into the inlet of the Line Vac. Then re-connect your compressed air supply to the 3rd leg of the pipe tee. Operate the Line Vac and note your working pressure on the gauge. If it is less than 80 PSIG, you could do better on the pressure by up-sizing your feed lines and all fittings that are included within. Re-test the Line vac as outlined above and note any improvement in net working pressure.

OK, let us assume you were able to fix the supply problems that contributed to the excessive pressure drop. You can then make a modification to the Line Vac itself by taking it apart and removing the internal part called a generator. This is the part with the air jet holes drilled into it. You can proceed by enlarging these holes to a larger diameter. This will give you higher vacuum performance similar to our Heavy Duty Line Vac series of Line Vac. Do note that if you do not check your plumbing supply lines as indicated in the first paragraph, making this modification could make things worse. So, you do need to be confident that your compressed air system is up to the task.

Another direction you can take will be to go to a smaller size Line Vac to improve your performance. This may seem counter-intuitive at first, but have an open mind.  Going smaller size on Line Vac reduces your air consumption requirement which makes the demand on your compressed air system less which reduces the chances of you have an extreme pressure drop at the Line Vac. The other idea at work here is that you are essentially trying to pull a vacuum over a smaller cross-section area with a smaller Line Vac which enables higher air velocity within the conveying tube with less effort. That higher conveying air velocity is what you need to pull these relatively dense alumina balls without having them stall inside the conveying hose.

If I were to suggest a size to move down to, I’d go with a 1-1/4″ unit from the 2″ model you have now. That would take your air requirement at 80 PSIG down from 45 SCFM to 26 SCFM. In other words, cutting the air required by almost half.  Hopefully, now you are beginning to have the understanding. And then, you can make the same hole enlarging modification to the 1-1/4″ unit that I described above if you wanted to in order to improve through put by about 20 – 30%.  Do note that you have to be able to maintain input pressure right at the Line Vac in all cases.

Best regards,
Neal Raker, Application Engineer
nealraker@exair.com

%d bloggers like this: