Threaded Line Vacs: Low Cost Conveyor Uses Ordinary Pipe!

EXAIR’s Threaded Line Vac air operated conveyor takes an ordinary pipe and converts it into a powerful conveying system.  A fast, low cost way to convey items such as pellets, scrap trim, bulk solids, chips, paper, small parts, sawdust, granules, and so much more. The Threaded Line Vac attached easily to plumbing pipe couplers, like PVC or iron, making it easy to build a complete system with parts readily available from your local supply house or hardware store.

The Threaded Line Vac are ideally suited for conveying large volumes of materials over long distances.  Like the standard, smooth bore ended Line Vacs, the unit works by ejecting a small amount of compressed air to produce a vacuum suction on the inlet side and a high output flow from the outlet side.  By using a pressure regulator to control the compressed air supply pressure, the rate of conveyance can be controlled to match the application needs, while minimizing the compressed air usage.


Models are available from 3/8 NPT to 3 NPT with materials of construction of aluminum and types 313 and 316 stainless steels (excellent corrosion resistance.)  High temperature versions of the stainless steel Threaded Line Vacs are available as well, for temperatures up to 900°F.

For those processes requiring the highest rates of conveyance over the longest distances and/or the most abrasive of materials, the Heavy Duty Threaded Line Vac is the right choice.  Designed with the most rugged industrial processes and applications in mind, the special hardened alloy construction helps prevent premature wear that could occur with standard aluminum or stainless steel models, under the harshest of conditions.  The performance has been boosted, to be able to convey more material, over longer distances and higher vertical rises.


To select the right model, information regarding these criteria is helpful-

  • Size of parts and bulk density of material being conveyed
  • What size hose, tube, or pipe is desired
  • Target conveyance rate
  • Distance of conveyance, both horizontal and vertical legs
  • Preferred material of construction

For another look, please see the video available that provides more details about the Line Vac family.

If you would like to talk about Line Vacs or any of the EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air® Products, feel free to contact EXAIR and myself or one of our Application Engineers can help you determine the best solution.

Brian Bergmann
Application Engineer

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Line Vac – Air Operated Conveyors

Convey parts, materials, and waste – with no moving parts!

The Line Vac is a fast, low cost way to convey pellets, scrap trim, textiles, bulk solids, food products, chips, and much more.  Simply connect to a standard hose, tube, or pipe and a powerful in-line conveyor is created.

Available in (4) materials – aluminum, 303 and 316 stainless steels, and a special hardened alloy, and (3) end connection types – NPT threaded, smooth bore, and the new sanitary flanged. Sizes range from 3/8″ up to a 6″. It is certain that an available Line Vac option will meet your process criteria.

For lighter materials and short conveyance distances, the Light Duty model is ideal, and for the most abrasive and heaviest materials over longer distances, the Heavy Duty style is available.

The Line Vacs offer many safety benefits, including eliminating the dangers of lifting heavy sacks and climbing ladders to fill hoppers, and with the 316 stainless steel sanitary flanged Line Vacs, food materials are kept enclosed and and separated and provides ease of cleaning.

Check out the video by clicking the photo below


The Line Vac works by having a small amount of compressed air injected through directed nozzles to produce a vacuum on one end and high output air flow on the other, with instantaneous response.  By using a pressure regulator, available as part of a kit or separately, the flow of the material transfer can be easily controlled. No moving parts or electricity assures maintenance free operation!

Trim Scrap Removal

Conveyance rates are determined by the material bulk density, typical particle size, total distance of conveyance, including vertical rise, and the targeted transfer rate.  An EXAIR Application Engineer can assist you, and with the above information, recommend the right size and type of Line Vac to meet the desired results.

All catalog models are in stock and we ship same day with an order received by 3 pm EDT in the US and 2 pm EDT for orders shipping to Canada.

Our team of engineers can design a special Line Vac to meet many applications special requirements, from special materials such as PVC and PVDF to special end connections such as pipe flanges and barbed hose connections.  Let us know the special requirements of your process and we’ll design a solution.

Special Flanged LV
This special 3/4″ Line Vac was designed to evacuate fumes from a silicone wafer etching operation

To go with the Line Vac, we can provide a reinforced, heavy wall, clear PVC conveyance hose in lengths up to 50′.  Additionally, the Line Vac Drum Cover is a fine mesh, non-woven cover built to fit on the top of a 30 or 55 gallon drum.  It is designed to contain the material to the drum and allow the air from the Line Vac to escape.

Drum Cover, for 30 and 55 Gallon Drums

If you have questions regarding the Line Vac, or would like to talk about any EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air® Product, feel free to contact EXAIR and myself or one of our Application Engineers can help you determine the best solution.

Brian Bergmann
Application Engineer

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Heavy Duty Line Vac Saves Backs and Shoulders!

Recently, I worked with a customer that was looking for a way to make a difficult job easier, reducing stress and strain on the body and preventing injury.  The customer was in the Environmental Services & Hazardous Waste Management area and regularly was called out to service acid neutralization tanks. These are commonly found in hospitals, laboratories, and schools, to neutralize lab wastewater before it is discharged to the sanitary sewer.  The systems typically utilize limestone chips to aid the in process.

Acid Neutralization Tank
                       Typical Acid Neutralization Tank Layout Sketch

Periodic maintenance includes the removal and disposal of the spent limestone chips, tank cleaning and replenishment with new limestone chips.  Some of the tanks are tall and narrow, making access to the limestone chips difficult, especially near the tank bottom. Current procedures involved small shovels and unnatural body positions to try to reach the bottom-most material.  A better way had to be found.

The customer came across the EXAIR website and found the Line Vac product line. After watching the demonstration video, he knew he had found his solution!  The Line Vac is a compressed air operated device that turns any hose or tube into a powerful in-line conveyor. Based on the height of the tanks and the size and weight of the limestone, we agreed the 2″ Heavy Duty Line Vac would provide the power and durability to empty the tanks in a timely manner, and safely and efficiently.  The customer would use a tow behind compressor so that a reliable source of compressed air would always be available.

hdlvkit (2)
Heavy Duty Line Vac Kit – Includes Auto Drain Filter Separator and Pressure Regulator

The Heavy Duty Line Vacs are available in sizes from 3/4″ up to 3″ in both smooth end and threaded connections for use with hose or pipe for conveyance.

To discuss your application and how an EXAIR Line Vac can make your transfer process easier and safer, feel free to contact EXAIR and myself or one of our other Application Engineers can help you determine the best solution.

Brian Bergmann
Application Engineer

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EXAIR Knowledge Base Makes Problem Solving Easy

EXAIR makes every effort to solve your manufacturing problems, increase your efficiency and raise the bar on your safety practices. We try to do that immediately, today, right now and we’d like you to be on your way to an improved facility by tomorrow – that is why we stock all of our cataloged products and ship same day on domestic orders received by 3 pm. In order to do that it seems you would prefer to be working with a company that’s easy to do business with, and EXAIR is easy. One way we try and achieve this is by providing as much general information as we can under the Knowledge Base section of our website.  By taking advantage of the free registration, you gain access to a variety of helpful information that can help simplify your selection process and provide the final details to complete a particular project.

Knowledge Base
The Knowledge Base can be found in the black menu bar at the top of our webpage.

Take, for example, our full CAD Library providing 3D models and 2D dimensional drawings in several different formats which can be used by MANY different programs. Whether you are looking for a .stp file for a 72″ Super Air Knife or the .dwg file for a medium sized Vortex Tube, the information is readily available for download without needing to place a call to our office.

Another useful tool is our Case Study library which features a database showcasing the  benefits of using an EXAIR product in place of existing inefficient or unsafe blowoffs. Just a few benefits to list would be compressed air savings, safety improvements, achieving OSHA compliance, an increase in production, lowering the decibel level in a work area or overall money savings. We are continually looking to add useful information to the library and can offer some EXAIR swag or an incentive in exchange for quantifiable data. (give me a call for details!)

Case Study (505x640)
Example of a Case Study Report.

Maybe your looking for a specific EXAIR solution to a common industrial process? I invite you to take a look at our Application Database. From conveying plastic pellets to a hopper or needing to remove noxious fumes from a coating application, the desired information might just be a simple click away.

These are just a small sample of the useful tools available for easy use. If you can’t find the information you’re looking for or have a specific application you would like to discuss, give us a call so we can help.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer

Line Vac Troubleshooting / Alumina Ball Conveying

Recently, I had a good interaction with a customer on a Line Vac Application. You can read through the e-mail below to get a better understanding of the issues at work in a typical conveying application.

Dear Sir,

We have Line Vac model 6084 operating at between 80 & 90 psig. We are trying to convey alumina balls to a height of about 12 ft. The balls are spherical with diam. between 4 & 7mm (about 1/4 inch). Packed density =50lbs/ ft3 actual density must be in region of 60lbs/ft3. We are only able to convey a very small amount of alumina. Feeding more than a nominal amount blocks the feed tube. Can you please help?


Hello Robert,

Yes, I think we have a few ideas you can consider to make the application work a little better.

First thing you must do is to verify with zero doubt about the actual, net operating pressure at the Line Vac inlet. The way you do this is to install a pressure gauge onto a pipe tee and install the pipe tee into the inlet of the Line Vac. Then re-connect your compressed air supply to the 3rd leg of the pipe tee. Operate the Line Vac and note your working pressure on the gauge. If it is less than 80 PSIG, you could do better on the pressure by up-sizing your feed lines and all fittings that are included within. Re-test the Line vac as outlined above and note any improvement in net working pressure.

OK, let us assume you were able to fix the supply problems that contributed to the excessive pressure drop. You can then make a modification to the Line Vac itself by taking it apart and removing the internal part called a generator. This is the part with the air jet holes drilled into it. You can proceed by enlarging these holes to a larger diameter. This will give you higher vacuum performance similar to our Heavy Duty Line Vac series of Line Vac. Do note that if you do not check your plumbing supply lines as indicated in the first paragraph, making this modification could make things worse. So, you do need to be confident that your compressed air system is up to the task.

Another direction you can take will be to go to a smaller size Line Vac to improve your performance. This may seem counter-intuitive at first, but have an open mind.  Going smaller size on Line Vac reduces your air consumption requirement which makes the demand on your compressed air system less which reduces the chances of you have an extreme pressure drop at the Line Vac. The other idea at work here is that you are essentially trying to pull a vacuum over a smaller cross-section area with a smaller Line Vac which enables higher air velocity within the conveying tube with less effort. That higher conveying air velocity is what you need to pull these relatively dense alumina balls without having them stall inside the conveying hose.

If I were to suggest a size to move down to, I’d go with a 1-1/4″ unit from the 2″ model you have now. That would take your air requirement at 80 PSIG down from 45 SCFM to 26 SCFM. In other words, cutting the air required by almost half.  Hopefully, now you are beginning to have the understanding. And then, you can make the same hole enlarging modification to the 1-1/4″ unit that I described above if you wanted to in order to improve through put by about 20 – 30%.  Do note that you have to be able to maintain input pressure right at the Line Vac in all cases.

Best regards,
Neal Raker, Application Engineer

Ionizing Point Best Thing for Static on Trim Scrap in Cyclone Separator

This application came in from our distributor (AYRFUL) in Argentina. They had a customer who is recycling film scraps. The scrap material is conveyed into a cyclone separator. The problem is that the scrap becomes charged with static as a result of the motions and interactions within the conveying pipe. This results in the scrap sticking to itself and to the parts of the cyclone separator inside. The problem is so bad that it becomes almost impossible to separate the material when it comes time to clear it out of the cyclone separator once clogged.

After discussing the challenges the customer faced in trying to keep their cyclone up and running, we decided to recommend that the customer utilize 4 pieces of EXAIR’s Model 7199 Ionizing Point and 1 piece of Model 7941 (4 outlet Power Supply) to neutralize the static within the cyclone.

The ionizing Points would be attached by means of inserting through the wall of the inlet pipe of the cyclone separator.

Ion Point


The existing blower moving air into the cyclone separator will do the job of carrying the positive and negative ions into the cyclone separator and keep it and the contents at a neutral state.

If you have a similar problem, contact us to discuss the application. We would be glad to help with our full range of static eliminators to address your application issues.

Neal Raker, Application Engineer

Line Vac Conveys Small Parts Directly From Mold Cavity to Shipping Box

In the U.S., EXAIR Corporation works factory direct with our customers. Occasionally, we will discuss applications and come up against some questions for which we don’t have a solid answer for the customer. One of the solutions we have for this circumstance is a risk free 30 day guarantee the customer can take advantage of to return the product if things don’t work out for any reason. This applies to any stock item we have and is always there to act as a reasonable back stop so that the customer isn’t stuck with a solution that is not really working for them.

Another solution we offer is our Efficiency Lab. In those cases where the customer is trying to justify the energy savings for their application but don’t have the right tools at their disposal, we can arrange to have them ship their current “air solution” to us and we can measure, force, flow, sound level and even static decay rate if necessary. We then provide a full report of what they have submitted and make a recommendation of a suitable EXAIR product that could take the place and provide a higher efficiency in operation which will translate into operation cost savings, process improvement, increased safety, lower sound operation or all of these combined.

A customer in the plastic injection molding industry contacted me the other day and wanted to know if he could convey his parts (a small, barrel-shaped component used in coax cable connections). He wanted to use a ¾” Line Vac model 6080 to do it. I had some reservations about it because his part had an outside diameter of .435” and a length of .62”. Since it was a barrel shape and was so close to the ½” inside diameter dimension of the Line Vac,  I was concerned that they could cock in the tube leading to the Line Vac and get stuck. Another concern was that the customer wanted to mount multiple, ¾” hoses side by side on a fixture and have the fixture come up to within 7” of the parts and have the parts drop off their ejector pins and go right into the throat of the hoses. Again, I had serious doubts.

I mentioned our options above and he asked if I could run a quick test for him if he sent me some of his parts. I agreed and a couple days later I had the parts laying on my desk. We pulled together a model 6080 ¾” Line Vac and some ¾” ID hose, connected the air and began testing. I started with a healthy 80 PSIG and those parts shot out of the output hose like a bullet. Nothing got stuck, no matter how I oriented the parts to the suction hose, the capture velocity at the tip of the suction hose worked to properly orient the part and pull it in.

After I determined that it would work at 80 PSIG, I wanted to see how low I could go with the input pressure and keep good performance. I went down to 30 PSIG and did have some problems with parts getting stuck just before the Line Vac. So, I bumped the pressure up to 40 PSIG. Everything worked smoothly and nothing became stuck.

Next I wanted to actually drop the parts into the suction hose to see if they could manage to go in. It worked beautifully!  I held the parts directly above the hose at about 7 inch height and the capture velocity of the vacuum flow oriented the parts properly again and pulled them right on through.

Now, the customer will be buying one himself to run his test. If all goes well on his end, we’re looking at another 15 pieces to be used on a single molding machine and there are multiple machines to outfit.

Neal Raker, Application Engineer