The Life of a Coffee Bean

Many of us get up in the morning, and start our day with a fresh cup of coffee.  I do.  I enjoy the taste of that warm beverage as it hits my lips.  But, have you ever thought about the journey of a coffee bean from the fields to your cupboard?   I would like to share a little insight on this journey and how the EXAIR Line Vacs could be a helpful tool for coffee production.

There are over 70 countries that pick coffee beans for export.  In 2018, the International Coffee Organization reported almost 170 million bags of coffee had been exported around the world.  That is a lot of coffee.  Each bag of coffee beans weighs 60 Kilograms (132 lbs.) and is difficult to handle manually.  Line Vacs could be that vital instrument to help speed up the processes and reduce that back-breaking work.

Let’s start at the beginning.  Coffee beans are seeds that are produced on small trees or bushes.  During harvest time, the cherries (coffee seeds) are picked when ripe, and they need to be dried.  This can be done in two ways; the dry method or the wet method.  Each process has to be done quickly to prevent spoilage.  With the dry method, the beans are spread out on a table or grate to be dried by the sun.  In most cases, the beans will have to be stored in bins at night or during rain.  This drying process can last for several weeks, and the continuous movement of the beans is labor intensive.  For the wet method, this process uses water channels to isolate the heavier ripe beans, so that they can be separated by size in rotating drums.   They are then placed into large fermentation tanks to remove the outer skin layer.  The wet beans are then placed inside large driers to remove the excess water content.  In both methods, the green coffee beans are packed into sacks for exportation.

When the green coffee beans arrive to their destination, they will have to be roasted.  This will convert the green coffee beans into the aromatic brown beans that are sold at your favorite market or coffee shop.  In large operations, the green coffee beans are screened and stored in bins waiting to be roasted.  The roasting process uses hot air to “cook” the green coffee beans.  The temperature range and time will create your different types of roasts; light roast, medium roast, and dark roast.  Industrial roasting machines have loaders on top to drop the green beans into a preheated rotating drum.  Some machines can roast 100 kg (220 lbs.) of beans at one time.  The time for roasting is between 12 – 15 minutes, depending on the type of roast.  At this frequency, you can tell the “need for speed” to keep the coffee roasters operating.  Once finished, the roasted beans are dumped into a cooling tray until they can be handled.  From there, the beans are tested, qualified, and packaged for sale.

For coffee brewing, the roasted beans will need to be ground.  Grinding is an important process to get the most flavor from your coffee beans.   Commercial sized grinders will blend multiple kinds of roasted coffee beans and grind them to a desired grain size.  The grind size is very important and has to match your type of brewing.  For example, espresso uses fine grinds, drip-type coffee uses medium grinds, and cold brews and French presses use coarse grinds.  Grinding is an art as you have to match the coarseness with the contact time in hot water.  As a rule, if your coffee tastes too bitter, then the grinds are too fine.  If your coffee tastes flat, then the grinds are too coarse.  You have to experiment with different blends of roasted coffee beans, grind particle sizes, and brewing types to get that perfect cup of java for you.

Line Vacs can convey many things.

So, if you are reading this article while sipping on a cup of coffee, let me tell you a secret about the journey of the coffee bean.  For every stage above, an EXAIR Line Vac has been sold and used to transport the coffee beans.  From the coffee fields to the grinding house, Line Vacs are a great device for companies to move beans quickly and safely without manual labor.  The life of a coffee bean is only successful if it is able to reach your cupboard.  And Line Vacs can be beneficial with that success.  If you would like to discuss the types of materials that we stock, the sizes, connections types and conveyance rates, an Application Engineer at EXAIR will be happy to help you.

John Ball
Application Engineer
Email: johnball@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_jb

 

Photo:  Coffee Beans Cafe Roasted Caffeine Brown by Alexas_Fotos.  Pixabay License.

Photo: Still Life Coffee Beans Coffee Powder Coffee Cup by Myriams-Fotos.  Pixabay License.

Compressed Air Technology Solves Problems In Multiple Applications

HDDV
The Heavy Duty Dry Vac family

I received a phone call from an engineer at a coffee manufacturer about a better method to transfer their coffee beans before and after roasting, and after grinding.  The application was similar to processes I saw a few years ago during a customer visit with our Costa Rican distributor, so I was thankfully able to visualize the process fairly well and knew that our air operated conveyors (Line Vacs) could provide a solution.

The conveyance problem was what initially interested this customer in EXAIR products, though after further discussions, we also uncovered a need to vacuum spilled coffee grounds from the floor, sometimes in rather large quantities.

Customer: “It’s a shame you don’t sell these (Line Vacs) as complete vacuum systems.”

EXAIR: “Actually, we do.”

Customer: “Where is that on your site??  We have electric vacs and are BURNING them up!”

I directed the engineer to our Industrial Housekeeping Products, ultimately settling on the Heavy Duty Dry Vac for this application.  Initially, we explored using a Chip Vac, which would have worked well.  But, the customer wanted to vacuum any spilled material as quickly as possible, so the higher vacuum flow of the Heavy Duty Dry Vac proved to be an important feature.  The Heavy Duty Dry Vac also offers a static resistant hose, something else that the customer highly valued.

By solving one problem we were able to uncover another and offer a solution for it as well.  If you have a problem for which a fast, efficient, maintenance free vacuum system could offer a solution, contact an EXAIR Application Engineer.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

Line Vac Used In Coffee Roasting Applications

coffee

It is no surprise that coffee is one of the most popular beverages around the world. And, as a result, coffee roasting operations are quite prevalent anywhere from Seattle, Washington to Durban, South Africa. With so many roasters in operation in various capacities, there is a need to handle the product in order to get it from point A to point B throughout the operation. This is where our Line Vac product has come into play.

ss lv

As mentioned, coffee roasting companies can vary in size from small, custom houses, to large concerns who produce the bulk of the coffee roasted. The Line Vac tends to work very well in the hopper loading applications for the smaller, custom roasting companies who might process up to a few hundred pounds of a particular blend. More specifically, our Stainless Steel and 316 Stainless Steel varieties are used due to the normal practice of using stainless steels in food processing applications. Generally, most customers stick with the 1-1/2” size as this seems to convey the coffee beans quite well and at a reasonable conveying rate. This would be either model 6063 or 6063-316 depending on your process preferences concerning which type of stainless to use.

The Line Vac is easy to disassemble for cleaning and sanitizing purposes as well.

If your company is concerned with roasting coffee (and thus transporting it around), perhaps the EXAIR Line Vac might be a real solution to your handling needs.

Neal Raker, Application Engineer
nealraker@exair.com