Validating Performance – it’s Nice From an Outside Source

Customers continually request the performance characteristics of our products. They inquire about how much compressed air our products will reduce within their application or plant. They ask how EXAIR can decrease the noise levels in their production environments or what products will help them achieve OSHA compliance, thus preventing fines or citations. Fortunately for EXAIR these are the easy questions. Due to the longevity of our employees, many of us know those answers off the top of our heads. If we don’t, the answers can be found within our catalog or website. These performance characteristics are quantifiable and/or identifiable by measurement or design and we readily list them in charts or identify products as OSHA compliant.

We also broadcast other, less tangible, performance data about the way our company operates. EXAIR annually (since 1997) tracks our on-time shipments and we have been at 99.9% on time since 1997! Up until a few years ago it was a difficult message to broadcast. Now we generally send out a tweet or two, write it in the blog or place it on our Facebook page. But you still have to take our word for it.

Internally we know how fast we confirm orders and get them out the door, but it is difficult for prospective customers to perceive. The shipping guys are well aware of how accurately they ship products, and so are the individual customers they ship to – but if customers knew just how accurate those guys are across the board they would be impressed.

EXAIR has always expected this kind of performance from us, which results in a group of employees who don’t know anything different than quick and precise order confirmations, extremely accurate and fast shipping, quality and consistent product performance (to name a few) – all from real people willing to speak with you and help you accordingly.

So when we receive recognition from an outside source for doing what we know how to do, it is icing on the cake and greatly appreciated. I am happy to say that we have been recognized by Grainger as a Partner in Performance for 2011, an award that goes to less than 1% of Grainger’s 3000+ suppliers who meet a high set of performance standards as measured by Grainger.

It’s all in the intangibles, the qualities EXAIR possesses that are difficult to communicate unless given the chance to prove it. We would like to thank Grainger for the award and thank them for recognizing EXAIR’s abilities to help Grainger meet the high standards they demand for their own company. If we can do it for Grainger, we can do it for you. Give us a call and let us prove it.

Kirk Edwards
Application Engineer
kirkedwards@exair.com

Customer or Process – Which Master to Serve

For the past century the manufacturing community has been trying to serve multiple masters but not being very successful at it. Manufacturers feel they have to serve the customer but they invest all of their time and resources into their manufacturing technologies.

The erosion of the American auto industry to foreign competition is a prime example. During the 70’s and 80’s, Detroit was spewing out gas guzzling rust buckets designed the way they wanted not necessarily what the customer wanted. Their attention was focused on higher production.

Customer choice was limited. It was one of the “Big Three” of some lesser European import. When they were challenged to come us with a more reliable, safe, and less polluting vehicle they dug their feet in and protested. They complied but the engines ran rough and ran backwards when turned off. They got even less gas mileage.

Then the Japanese hit our shores with a quality, safe dependable vehicle at a competitive price. That was a game changer. Other foreign competitors seized the opportunity and now we have 200 HP cars that get 40 miles per gallon and pass all EPA pollutant directives.

So a manufacturer can serve two masters. All they have to do is follow an age-old mantra “Give the customer a quality product at a competitive price, delivered on time

EXAIR from its inception has subscribed to this. We achieve 99.9% on time deliveries not just once but every year for over a decade. Our products have a 5 year built to last warranty and our product line expansion is consumer driven. Long before energy conservation was a buzzword, EXAIR was building compressed air products that conserved compressed air.

If you would like to explore how EXAIR products can improve your energy conservation give one of our application engineers a call at 1-800-903-9247 or visit our website www.exair.com

Joe Panfalone
Application Engineer
Phone (513) 671-3322
Fax (513) 671-3363
Web: www.exair.com
Twitter: www.twitter.com/exair_jp
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

Comments, Rating, Customer Reviews, and Seeing is Believing

With virtually any product just a click away these days it is very easy to purchase anything you could want or need within a few minutes of turning on your computer, tablet, phone, or even gaming system. With this online shopping, the power of the consumer has greatly been perpetuated.  If someone is not happy with a product they will write a review or leave a comment, heck they may even write a blog about it.

This is where outstanding product quality, customer support, and standing behind what you sell is able to stand out.   Here at EXAIR we will not only have a real person answer the phone when you call, but if you have any questions you will talk to an actual Application Engineer, not a sales person.  This is why we don’t just slap something in your hand and move on to the next customer.  We will ask questions and help to work through your application to figure out what is going to have the best fit.  If we don’t feel that we have a viable solution then we’ll tell you exactly that.  We may even refer you to a company that we have heard can help.

Then after we figure out what will fit we’ll let you get the product in-house for 30 days and “Put it through the wringer”.  If the product doesn’t work to your liking all you have to do is call back and let us know.  It truly is that simple.

What better way to find out first hand as to whether the quality or the ability of a product is going to suit your needs?

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

The State of Manufacturing

 

Most of my reading about current events is done online.  Today, however, I had the opportunity to read the paper as I was waiting for an appointment.  I found my way to the business section and was please to find a number of good articles addressing US manufacturing.

These articles were in response to Tuesday night’s State of the Union Address by President Obama, during which he discussed improving employment possibilities through creating more manufacturing jobs.  Regardless of the private sector in which your company operates, a national call for an increase in domestic manufacturing is, and should be, a topic of much regard.

I found these articles to be of particular interest considering EXAIR’s position as a manufacturer in the marketplace.  I’ve included links to the three articles on the front page of the business section below.

What Industry Needs

Manufacturing Creates Value for Employees and Communities

Manufacturing Must Be a National Priority

If you have a moment to read through them, please do.  And please share your thoughts.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
leeevans@exair.com
@EXAIR_LE

Resolutions

For the past few weeks, the locker room at the gym has been pretty full. No matter; it’ll thin out soon…this happens every year, when people flock in droves to fitness centers, seeking to capitalize on that fresh commitment to make this the year that they realize their fitness goals. Some will stick with it, though, and I sincerely hope they find the payoff they’re looking for…mainly, because I’m one of them.

Just as the new year provides an opportunity for us to examine and evaluate our current personal situations – physical, financial, relational, just to name a few of the “usual suspects” – it’s also a popular time for organizations to take stock as well. I don’t think it’s a coincidence that the President of the United States traditionally delivers the State of the Union address soon after the beginning of the year, nor do I find it curious that the lead article on www.sustainableplant.com yesterday was “Ten Areas to Examine on an Annual Energy Audit.”

I assume this won’t come as a surprise, but “Air System” made the list. This point is of particularly keen interest to us at EXAIR, since many of our products are used to specifically address the issue of compressed air optimization. This is normally the place where I’d go through the Six Steps to Optimization, but our Brian Farno did such a good job with this a few weeks ago, so I’ll go deeper “into the vault” with this gem of a video, and let Professor Penurious tackle the subject, as only he can. As an added bonus, I hope this also serves as a reminder for the sports fans and Seasonal Affective Disorder sufferers among us (I plead guilty on both counts) that the basketball Madness in March is just over six weeks away…

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
(513)671-3322 local
(800)923-9247 toll free
(513)671-3363 fax
Web: http://www.exair.com
Blog: https://blog.exair.com/
Twitter: twitter.com/exair_rb
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

There’s no such thing as too large a compressed air line

Whenever I am troubleshooting an application that is experiencing a pressure drop, the first thing I look for is the air line and fitting sizes. In one such application we reviewed the customer’s piping. The drop line size were within specs from the size and fitting charts but they were still experiencing a pressure drop at the application. The obvious conclusion would have been that they did not have enough compressed air to begin with. This did not bear out because their compressor was more than adequate.

Come to find out, the size of pipe they were using for the main header was too small to carry the volume of air the compressor could produce and needed throughout the shop. Their thinking was that the smaller pipe would reduce air consumption. In the end it does not work out that way. With the smaller pipe there is more resistance to flow which has to be overcome by increasing pressure at the compressor which is what they eventually did. Problem is, high pressure air is more expensive to produce and deliver than low pressure air. For a system operating at around 100 PSIG, a rule of thumb is that every 2 PSIG increase in operating pressure requires an additional 1% in operating energy costs.

The moral of the story is there’s no such thing as too large a compressed air line. To control consumption, focus should be centered on the point of use by using engineered nozzles designed to more efficiently use compressed air.

If you would like assistance with your application, give us a call at 1-800-903-9247

Joe Panfalone

Application Engineer

Phone (513) 671-3322

Fax (513) 671-3363

Web: www.exair.com

Twitter: www.twitter.com/exair_jp

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

Winter time blues

So after waking up to a nice 16° F temperature outside this morning I am ready for Spring.  Ok, I have to admit, we haven’t even got an accumulation of snow yet.  That doesn’t matter to me, I am ready for some track time on the ole SV.  Everyday I have to look at it sitting in the corner of the garage all surrounded with other warm weather items and then go out into the cold to get into my car.  It absolutely eats at me every single day.  Video below is of what I can’t wait to get back to.

[youtube:http://youtu.be/aTcV8M_dqtc?hd=1%5D

Fortunately, here in Cincinnati we normally start warming up around April.  That means first track day of the season, unless it suddenly decides to start dumping snow in April now.  If it does then I guess all the propaganda is true and global warming is real.

What brought this on is he handful of calls I have received this week about sizing the appropriate Cabinet Cooler System for electronic enclosures.  This isn’t a seasonal product for us like book bags or Easter baskets are for retail stores.  We sell these year round to customers across the globe.   It doesn’t have to be Summer to be getting a heat failure in a cabinet.  The application yesterday was for a new cabinet that was located outside of a heat treating furnace and was already overheating just do to the ambient temperature being around 150°F.  This is exactly why we developed our High Temperature Cabinet Cooler Systems.

They can withstand ambient environments up to 200° F and will still be able to maintain a safe working temperature for your electronics inside the enclosure.  So if you are still operating with the panel doors open on your machine because it’s hot inside and snowing outside the plant, give us a call, email, tweet, fax, or even request a live chat on our site.  With a little bit of information we’ll calculate how much cooling you need and tell you just how we are going to keep that panel cool.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF