Super Air Amplifiers and Amplification Ratio

Super Air Amplifier Family

In the pneumatic industry, there are two types of Air Amplifiers.  One type will amplify the inlet air pressure to a higher compression.  The other type uses the inlet air pressure to amplify the air volume.  EXAIR manufactures the volume type called the Super Air Amplifiers™.

This change in air volume is called the amplification ratio.  So, what does this mean?  The definition of a ratio is the relation between two amounts showing the number of times one value is contained within the other.  For the Super Air Amplifier, it is the value that shows the amount of ambient air that is contained within the compressed air.  The higher the ratio, the more efficient the blowing device is.  With the EXAIR Super Air Amplifiers, we can reach amplification ratios up to 25 to 1.  This means that 25 parts of ambient “free” air is introduced for every 1 part of compressed air.

Air Amplifiers Are Great For blowing!

Why an EXAIR Super Air Amplifier?  Like a fan, they are designed to move air.  But fans use motors and blades to push the air toward the target.  The fan blades “slap” the air which creates turbulent air flows and loud noises. The Super Air Amplifiers do not use any blades or motors to move the air.  They just use a Coanda profile and a patented shim to create a low pressure to draw in the ambient air.  In physics, it is much easier to pull than it is to push.  The process of pulling air through the Super Air Amplifiers make them a more efficient, uniform, and quiet way to blow air.

Most people think that compressed air is free, but it is most certainly not.  Because of the amount of electricity required, compressed air is considered to be the fourth utility in manufacturing plants.  To save on utility costs, it is important to use compressed air as efficiently as possible.  In reference, the higher the amplification ratio, the more efficient the compressed air product.  Manufacturing plants that use open fittings, copper tubes, and drilled pipes for blowing are not properly using their compressed air system.  These types of products generally only have between a 2:1 to 5:1 amplification ratio.  The Super Air Amplifiers can reach a 25:1 ratio.

EXAIR manufactures and stocks five different sizes ranging from ¾” (19mm) up to 8” (203mm) in diameter.  Some of the benefits that the Super Air Amplifiers have is the inlet and outlet can be ducted for remote positioning.  They are very compact and can fit into tight places.  They do not have any moving parts to wear or need electricity to run.  They only need clean compressed air to operate; so, they are maintenance-free.

Another unique feature of the EXAIR Super Air Amplifier is the patented shim which optimizes the low-pressure to draw in more ambient air.   With extracting welding smoke, increasing cooling capacities, and moving material from point A to point B; the more air that can be moved, the better the performance.  And with the patented shim inside the EXAIR Super Air Amplifiers, it provides that.  As an added bonus, they are OSHA safe and meet the standards for noise level and dead-end pressure.

Super Air Amplifier Patented Shims

To explain things in every day terms; the amplification ratio can be represented by gas mileage.  Like your car, you want to get the most distance from a gallon of gasoline.  Similarly, with your compressed air system, you want to get the most for your pneumatic equipment.  An EXAIR Super Air Amplifier has a 25:1 amplification ratio.; so, in other words, you can get 25 mpg.  If you use drilled pipes, open fittings, copper tubes, etc. for blowing, then you are only getting 2 to 5 mpg.  If you want to get the most “distance” from your compressed air system, you should check the “gas mileage” of your blow-off components.  If you need assistance, an Application Engineer at EXAIR can help you to “tune up” your compressed air system.

John Ball
Application Engineer
Email: johnball@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_jb

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