Dead End Pressure

With all the warm weather and outdoor activities around the house the past few weeks I had somewhat forgotten about a nice wasp nest that had been constructed in between the front door to our house and my bedroom window.  This also happens to be right in the corner of two walls and in the deepest portion of the landscaping.   Like I said though, I had forgotten about it for a few weeks which gave the inhabitants enough time to double the size of the nest.

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With that being said, I didn’t want to use wasp or bee spray because it means I would have to get close to the nest and I have a strong belief that all of those products just make them really angry and don’t bring death right away.  I wanted the nest to have a quick death because then I don’t have to run around my yard, screaming, because I have a wasp chasing me after destroying their home.

I cam up with several methods to get rid of the nest.

1.) Brake Cleaner – Very effective, however the nest was also right above our air conditioning condenser so that was out.

2.) Small controlled burn – In my experience it is never small nor controlled.   Plus it was way to close to the dry roofline.

3.) 3,000 psi of water in a jet stream from the pressure washer.  WINNER!!!!

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So I set out to the front of the house with the pressure washer and hose in tow.  Get everything setup and notice that there is one sentry wasp sitting right at the entrance.  So I simply got the nozzle of the gun with pin point spray as close as I could and as soon as the wasp started to move I shot the entire nest off the house.   Then I proceeded to shoot it back and forth in the landscaping until I saw no survivors.

That was 3,000 psi of water that tore through a nest and rid my house of a pest.  This made me think of just how little pressure the human skin can take.  OSHA standard CFR 1910.242(b) guards against a mere 30 PSIG. Higher pressure air, when blocked up against our skin, has the potential to push air into our bloodstream and cause air embolism – a serious threat to our health. Too many commercial air nozzles and guns, open pipes and homemade blow off violate this OSHA standard and pose a threat to personnel.

EXAIR engineered air nozzles and products have been designed to eliminate the possibility of being dead-ended (blocked). This is why all of EXAIR’s products meet or exceed the OSHA standard 1910.242(b) for 30 psi dead-end pressure.  None of our products can be dead ended and cause bodily harm when used properly.  These engineered features also reduce noise levels and minimize air consumption. So if you are concerned with any of your compressed air applications, and just how safe they are, contact us.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

 

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