How To Choose The Right Style & Size Vacuum Cup

When you are using vacuum to pick and place different objects, how do you know which style vacuum cup and size you need?  EXAIR offer’s (3) different styles of vacuum cups in a variety of sizes to cover a wide variety of applications.

The first is the round cup, they are suited to smooth, flat surfaces.  They grip and release quickly, hold their shape with frequent use, and grip well when used with vertical loads.  Also, round cups are offered with cleats for a better gripping power when the load is heavy.  Vacuum Cups with cleats provide extra rigidity that lends itself to heavy loads.  The extra rigidity prevents the cup from peeling away or deforming when a heavy load is required.

Large Round Cleated Vacuum Cup
Round Cup With Cleats

Next we have the Oval Cup, they provide the most gripping power due to their larger surface area.  They naturally lend themselves to heavier loads.  They are ideal for flat rigid sheet materials such as wood, glass, cardboard and composites.

Oval cup
Oval Cups Provide The Most Vacuum Which Make Them Ideal For Heavy Loads Due To Their Larger Contact Area

Last but not least we have the Bellows Cup, they are best suited for curved, uneven or textured surfaces.  The bellows or more accurately called “convolutions”, provide a collapsible area that allows the cup to quickly compress when it contacts the surface of item to be moved.  Please know that the grip/release time is greater due the the larger internal volume of the cup.

bellows cup
Bellows Cup Are Excellent For Uneven Or Textured Surfaces, However They Longer Pick-Up & Release Times

Here is an example: If we want to pick up a sheet of glass that weighs 20 lbs, what size vacuum cup(s) do we need?  Fortunately we have published charts in our catalog with the math already completed, but this is how we arrived at the answer.  Using the formula below:

Cup Diameter Formula

D = Cup Diameter
W = Weight of item
N = Factor of safety ( We recommend a safety factor of 2 for horizontal lifting and 4 for vertical lifting).  For this exercise we will use a safety factor of 4.
U = # of cups (Remember it takes a minimum of 3 points to make a plane)
V = Vacuum level (psi) – Exair Porous E-Vac’s are rated to 21″ HG, Non – Porous 27″ HG and the Adjustable E-Vac 25″ HG.   (Each inch of HG equals .491154 PSI)
π = 3.14159
μ = Vertical surface friction coefficient (.5 for typical non-porous materials such as metal, glass, stone, etc..)

Cup Diameter Formula Solved

The calculated diameter is 2.26″ so we would choose the next standard size which is 2.5″ diameter.

When you are looking for Vacuum Cup application assistance or expert advice on safe, quiet and efficient point of use compressed air products give us a call.   We would enjoy hearing from you!

Russ Bowman, CCASS

Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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Different Types of Heat Transfer and How to Calculate their Values

Heat transfer like the name states is the way that heat transfers from one entity to another.  Heat is defined as a motion of molecules.  So, heat is anything above the absolute temperature of 0 Kelvin (-460 deg. F or -273.15 deg. C).  Thus, heat is relative.  Now, for heat to transfer, we need to have a difference in temperatures.  Energy like heat will always travel from the higher temperatures toward the lower temperatures; and there are three major ways that this can happen; conduction, convection, and radiation.  By the first Law of Thermodynamics, energy is neither created or destroyed, only transferred.  In this blog, I will explain each type of heat transfer.

  • Heat Transfer by Conduction

Conduction is about two stationary objects that are in contact.  The vibration of the molecules of one object will affect the vibration of the molecules adjacent to it.  Examples of conduction would be the cold air outside a window pane in a warm room.  Or a hot iron sitting on your wrinkled pants.  The heat from the hotter object will flow to the cooler object.  Thus, the hot object will become cooler while the cool object will become hotter.  This can be explained in Equation 1:

Equation 1 :

Q = -k * A * (T2 – T1) / x

Q – Heat Transfer (Watts)

k – Thermal Conductivity of material (Watts/K-m)

A – Heat Transfer Area (m2)

T2 – Temperature of object 2 (Kelvin, K)

T1 – Temperature of object 1 (Kelvin, K)

x – Material Thickness (m)

 

  • Heat Transfer by Convection

Convection describes heat transfer between surfaces that are in motion. This happens by moving a fluid which can be a liquid or air across an object.  There are two types, free convection and assisted convection.  Free convection is caused by gravity or buoyancy.  The basement will be cooler than the second floor because hot air will rise.  The density of warm air is less than cold air, so it will rise.  As for assisted or forced convection, the fluid will be moved over a surface with a pump, fan, or some other type of mechanical device.  An example of forced convection would be blowing your breath over your cup of coffee to cool.  Another example is the EXAIR Super Air Amplifier.  This device uses a small amount of compressed air to amplify the volume of ambient air.  When blown across a heated surface, it can cool the object quickly.   The calculation for heat transfer by convection is shown in Equation 2.

Equation 2:

Q = h * A * (T2 – T1)

Q – Heat Transfer (Watts)

h – Convective Coefficient (Watts/K-m2)

A – Heat Transfer Area (m2)

T2 – Temperature of object 2 (Kelvin, K)

T1 – Temperature of object 1 (Kelvin, K)

 

  • Heat Transfer by Radiation

Radiation refers to the transfer of heat through electromagnetic waves. Of course, the largest radiation source is our sun.  You can feel the difference when you wear a black shirt versus a white shirt.  Any object will adsorb, reflect, and transmit the radiation at different values depending on the color, surface finish, and material type.  This is called emissivity.  Emissivity, or e, is a coefficient that determines the ability of that object to adsorb the heat from radiation.  Thus, the value of e is between zero and one, and it is unitless.  By definition, 0 < e < 1.  Thus, a black object can have an emissivity of 1.  .  This is important for the EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Systems.  If the panel is outside and in full sun, we would use the color to determine the additional heat that can be absorbed by your electrical panel.  The equation for radiation heat transfer is shown in Equation 3.

Equation 3:

Q = e * A * s * ((Th)4 – (Tc)4)

Q – Heat Transfer (Watts)

e – Emissivity Coefficient

A – Heat Transfer Area (m2)

s – Stefan-Boltzmann Constant (5.6708 * 10-8 Watts/K4 m2)

Th – Temperature of hot body (Kelvin, K)

Tc – Temperature of cold body (Kelvin, K)

Thank you for reading the blog about the three main methods for heat transfer.  If you need to cool products, or remove the heat, EXAIR has many types of products to accomplish this.  You can contact an Application Engineer to discuss any of your applications dealing with heat and heat transfer.

John Ball
Application Engineer
Email: johnball@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_jb

 

Image courtesy of Arman Cagle, Creative Commons License

 

How Much Force Does It Take?

In case you weren’t aware, the answer to “How much force does it take?” is always going to be, ALL OF IT.   At least that is what we generally think when trying to blow product off a conveyor belt or diverting parts into bin, etc. Speed and efficiency play a direct role in to what nozzle or blow off device you should use in order to get the job done and be able to repeat the process.

The question we are often asked by customers is, “How much force to I need to move this?”  That is a question that we cannot often answer without asking more questions.  The good part of this is, there is a formula to calculate just how much force you need to move an object.   A good video explaining friction is shown below.

In order to answer the question of how much force do I need, we really need to know all of the following:

Weight of the object
Distance from target
Is it on an incline or level
Distance needed to move
Then, the usually unknown variable, the coefficient of friction between the target and what it is sitting on.

Often times it is the thought process of, my target weighs 5 pounds, I need 5 pounds of force in order to move it from the center of this conveyor belt to the edge, this is not the case.   If you wanted to lift the object over a break between two conveyors then you would need slightly more than 5 pounds in order to ensure you are lifting the front edge of the unit high enough to meet the other conveyor.

Whether you know all of the variables or only a few, if you need to get an object moved and you want to try using compressed air to do so, give us a call and we will help you find the best engineered solution for your application.  Then, we’ll back all stock products with a 30 day guarantee if you don’t like how the system performs – but rest assured, we get it right almost every time.

30 Day Guarantee
The EXAIR 30 Day Guarantee

Brian Farno
Application Engineer Manager
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF