How Much Force Does It Take?

In case you weren’t aware, the answer to “How much force does it take?” is always going to be, ALL OF IT.   At least that is what we generally think when trying to blow product off a conveyor belt or diverting parts into bin, etc. Speed and efficiency play a direct role in to what nozzle or blow off device you should use in order to get the job done and be able to repeat the process.

The question we are often asked by customers is, “How much force to I need to move this?”  That is a question that we cannot often answer without asking more questions.  The good part of this is, there is a formula to calculate just how much force you need to move an object.   A good video explaining friction is shown below.

In order to answer the question of how much force do I need, we really need to know all of the following:

Weight of the object
Distance from target
Is it on an incline or level
Distance needed to move
Then, the usually unknown variable, the coefficient of friction between the target and what it is sitting on.

Often times it is the thought process of, my target weighs 5 pounds, I need 5 pounds of force in order to move it from the center of this conveyor belt to the edge, this is not the case.   If you wanted to lift the object over a break between two conveyors then you would need slightly more than 5 pounds in order to ensure you are lifting the front edge of the unit high enough to meet the other conveyor.

Whether you know all of the variables or only a few, if you need to get an object moved and you want to try using compressed air to do so, give us a call and we will help you find the best engineered solution for your application.  Then, we’ll back all stock products with a 30 day guarantee if you don’t like how the system performs – but rest assured, we get it right almost every time.

30 Day Guarantee

The EXAIR 30 Day Guarantee

Brian Farno
Application Engineer Manager
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Actually Being Happy During the Holidays…..and Beyond

I thought I would depart from my usual application citation as I have just read a great article by author Jeff Haden, who writes for Inc. Magazine. I follow Jeff’s writing on LinkedIn. Instead of just Tweeting about his article, I was inspired to write about the content a bit and also offer his article up for your enjoyment as well.

The name of the article is, “10 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Incredibly Happy”.

I’ll give a quick run-down of the list here. Jeff goes into great detail on each point and provides a ton of links to further his case for each point.

  1. Exercise
  2. Get good and more sleep
  3. Spend more time with friends and family
  4. Get outside, preferably in a rural setting
  5. Help others
  6. Smile
  7. Plan a trip
  8. Meditate
  9. Move closer to work
  10. Practice Gratitude

He also offers an 11th point, getting older; which I’m sure we will all have to do sooner or later so not much choice on that one.

Strangely, eating more vegetables was not on the list. Sorry mom, you must have been wrong.

What struck me about his list was that there are at least 4 or 5 of these things that I keep meaning to do, but never seem to take the time to explore myself. They are all great ideas that, when practiced, not only have the result of making you a happier person, but also bring you back to your “center” and give you a sense that you have many important, intangible things in this world that money cannot buy.

It is a given that this time of year is full of top ten lists, mostly about pop culture garbage. It is ideas as expressed in Jeff’s article that convey the real and heartfelt things that really matter in this life. Practice being grateful for the things you have instead of wanting the things you don’t have. And SMILE!  My wife reminds me of this all the time. You can’t help but have a better feeling if you truly put some effort into it.

It is easy to dismiss such things as psycho-babel and not invest in yourself in such ways. But since these methods were scientifically proven, surely they must be given some rational credit. If you need an excuse, just say you read it on the internet so it must be true!

In all seriousness, I wish all our readers a Happy Holiday Season and hope that all of you can find true happiness in your life.

Neal Raker, Application Engineer
nealraker@exair.com

Understanding Gas Flow and Measurements

Both gas and liquid flows can be measured in volumetric or mass flow rates. With non-compressible liquids these two measurements are very nearly the same sans the effects of temperature. With compressible gasses though, they are very different. The same mass under different pressures will occupy dissimilar volumes.

To demonstrate this, take a folded fluffy comforter and weigh it. Then stuff into one of those storage bags that you suck down with a vacuum cleaner. The physical size becomes very much smaller but the weight (mass) stays the same.

When measuring a flow of a compressible gas through a pipe you are measuring volumetric flow. Unlike non-compressible liquids, it is of little value unless it is converted to mass flow which would be dictated by the pressure it is under. For example the utility company charges by the cubic foot of natural gas and gallons for water. With water you actually get a gallon as measured by the meter. With gas though, the mass you receive depends on pressure it is under.

To effectively measure gas flows, their volumetric flow rate has to be converted to standard conditions for temperature and pressure. Simply put, it is the volume it would occupy at atmospheric pressure (14.7 psi) and defined as standard cubic feet per minute (SCFM).

Convert flow from CFM to SCFM

 Qg = Q x P/14.7

Qg=Gas flow in standard cubic feet per minute (SCFM)

Q=Volume flow rate in cubic feet per minute (CFM)

P=Line pressure absolute (gage pressure +14.7).

Example: Convert gas flow expressed in cubic feet per minute (CFM) to units of standard cubic feet per minute (SCFM).

 Given:

Q = 20 CFM

P = 114.7 (100 psi gage reading +14.7)

Qg = Q x P/14.7     = 20 CFM x 114.7/ 14.7      = 156 SCFM

Flow meters used to measure gasses usually are calibrated for readings at atmospheric pressure. When the flow is under pressure, they provide a chart of factors associated with various pressures to multiply against the visual reading.

Joe Panfalone
Application Engineer
Phone (513) 671-3322
Fax   (513) 671-3363
Web: www.exair.com
Twitter: www.twitter.com/exair_jp
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

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Pies Are Round…Cakes Are Square!

So, it’s Pi Day…you math aficionados (read: geeks, and yes, I include myself among you) know what I’m talking about. For everyone else, today is March 14th, or 3/14, or 3.14, which is the mathematical constant that is the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter. Pi is commonly rounded off to nearest hundredth, although, as an irrational number, its decimal representation never ends, and never repeats. Over the centuries, computing Pi to a higher number of digits has been the fascination and passion of the prominent mathematicians of the day. In the 16th Century, Ludolph van Ceulen devoted the greater part of his life to calculating Pi to 35 decimal digits. He was so proud of his accomplishment that he had the digits engraved on his tombstone.

In the 21st Century, mathematicians have used computer programs to calculate Pi to mind-boggling accuracy: the current record stands at 5 trillion decimal digits. I’m not sure of who needs it to be that accurate, or what they’d use it for, but it reminded me of a funny story I heard from a friend’s father.

My friend Bill’s dad worked as an engineer for an aircraft engine manufacturer, and was involved with the first computer aided drafting program that they implemented. A fabricator came to him one day, and asked him how accurately he could plot the dimensions for an irregularly-shaped piece they needed to make out of sheet metal. He said he could easily get it to 0.001” accuracy, so he and the fabricator worked together to produce the drawing. When it came time to cut out the part, the fabricator proudly escorted my friend’s dad down to the shop floor, where he saw his drawing – with dimensions reported to the nearest thousandth of an inch – next to the piece of sheet metal, which they had laid out the dimensions on…using a tape measure and chalk. Then, they cut the part out. By hand. With an acetylene torch.

Perhaps since Pi Day is near the beginning of springtime in North America, the Application Engineers at EXAIR could also proclaim it the Official Start Date of Cabinet Cooler Season. If you have an electrical enclosure that requires cooling, we can help. If it’s existing equipment, we just need a few key dimensions and temperatures. If it’s a new application, we can work with any data you can provide. We won’t be calculating to the thousandth of anything, but we’ll get you the appropriately sized system for your enclosure.  To do this, we’ll be using algebra and geometry, but, unfortunately, no ∏.  Nor will we be applying trigonometry, but here’s a little something that I’m sure that true participants in Pi Day celebrations will appreciate:

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
(513)671-3322 local
(800)923-9247 toll free
(513)671-3363 fax
Web: http://www.exair.com
Blog: https://blog.exair.com/
Twitter: twitter.com/exair_rb
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

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