Coandă Profiles & Effect

Here at EXAIR, Coandă is a household name that can be heard on any given day multiple times throughout the day. The Coandă effect is fairly easy to visualize with a ligthweight ball and some high velocity airflow. Take the video below for example. This 2″ Super Air Amplifier on a stand powered at 40 psig at the inlet easily lifts this hollow plastic ball and then suspends the ball due to the Coandă effect.

If you were able to see the airflow, you would see it impacting the surface of the sphere at all different points then following the profile of the sphere until it colides with itself and is forced to separate off the surface. The turbulent flow on the top is creating a downward pressure as well. The science behind this was all found and showcased by Henri Coandă. He showcased this with a propulsion device which used a domed hood with airflow to follow the curvature of the dome then exit off the sharp edge or where the separate air streams began to recombine causing a turbulent / low pressure area depending on the angle.

This stream of air following a surface begins to pull in all surrounding and impacted air molecules from around the stream which is called entrainment. This is a key factor for EXAIR products and one reason the Coandă profiles are a key characteristic to obtaining the peak performance and efficiency out of a compressed air product.

As the high velocity air stream exits the EXAIR model 1100 Super Air Nozzle the ambient air is entrained around the fins and angled surfaces of the nozzle.

Many EXAIR products utilize the Coandă principle to improve their efficiencies and performance. Below you can see the EXAIR product families containing Coandă profiles within their design which increases the ambient air entrainment resulting in an amplified air blowoff.

Super Air Wipes, Super Air Knives, Super Air Nozzles and Super Air Amplifiers use the Coanda principle to become some of the most efficient compressed air blowoff products available.

If you would like to discuss how the Coandă profile and EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air Products® can help your process, please give us a call.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

A Ride Down Memory Lane

The past few weeks been very busy, both here at EXAIR and at home.    Last night was the first night in quite some time where I arrived home to a quiet house and which afforded me some time to decompress and process. I had roughly one hour of time before my wife and daughters got home and so I sat down and just stopped thinking about everything.   I turned the TV on and my Home Theater PC was going through all the pictures that we have stored on it as a slide show.

The pictures ranged from family gatherings before we had kids to my first daughter’s birth (wow, there are a lot of pictures of that first kid!), through time and up to the present which finds me with a 4 year old and a 16 month old.  You can even see our two dogs growing older in the pictures from every month.

In no time at all the hour was up and I heard the garage door opening up.  Then got to see the three women that make my life awesome come through the door – and its a great event to have young kids who still celebrate seeing their dad for the first time in a day.

Many of us have such busy lives that I’m sure you can appreciate some down time at home which allows you to refocus. It certainly helped me to bring everything here at EXAIR right back into focus.  EXAIR keeps pushing forward (in case you haven’t noticed) with expanded product lines, new products, new people and new services.  We’ve come a long way since we began in 1983.  Instead of a single product sheet for a catalog we now have a 164 page catalog and every single product line has grown to encompass more and more models.   Our product lines aren’t the only thing that have grown also.  You can see just how much we have grown by the many co-ops, Professor Penurious has enlisted, I mean employed. He’s had so many co-ops he has a slide show of his own.

Coop2coop3coop4coop5

So if you haven’t seen our newest items or are still rocking the timeless Catalog 99 because you like vintage items – give us a call or visit our website at EXAIR.com, a lot has changed but our top notch service remains.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

History of Machining Technology

At the time of the industrial revolution, Europeans and Americans approached machine tool design differently. In England,  there was no shortage of skilled labor. Rather than replacing workers, their machines made work more precise. Machines served to make talented artisans better. Meanwhile, in sparsely populated America, the needs of a new nation required rapid and simple means of production. In America, machines served to produce more with less labor.

antique

Next to Cincinnati, the largest concentration of machine tool builders was Milwaukee. Cincinnati was the birthplace for names like LeBlond, American Tool Works, Lodge & Shipley, and Cincinnati Milling Machine. Cincinnati is also the birthplace of EXAIR Corporation, an industry leader in Intelligent Compressed Air Products ® .

With its humble beginnings downtown on Findley Street producing air nozzles, EXAIR’s product line has since expanded into air knives, air amplifiers, vortex cooling, vacuum generators, atomizing spray nozzles, and static eliminators.

EXAIR has received many prestigious awards for product innovation. We are proud of our heritage, our community, and our employees who make it all happen.

We would welcome the opportunity to help you with your compressed air applications. We genuinely appreciate the opportunity! We can be reached at 1-800-903-9247 or click on the live chat icon in the upper left hand corner.

Joe Panfalone

Application Engineer
Phone (513) 671-3322
Fax (513) 671-3363
Web: http://www.exair.com
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/exair_jp
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

History of Compressed Air

The first use of compressed air did not come from compressors but the human lung. Healthy lungs can exert a pressure of .3 to 1.2 psi. Primitive people used the power of their lungs to propel darts from a blow gun. We use our lungs to blow off debris, stoke a fire, create sounds by voice and by musical instruments.

Around the third millennium B.C. , people began to melt metals such as gold, copper, tin and lead. Higher temperatures were needed requiring large volumes of air to stoke the furnaces: more than what the human lung could provide. Egyptian and Sumerian metallurgists used the wind directed through pipes for their work. Eventually tbellowhese were replaced by hand-operated bellows and then around 1500 B.C. the more efficient foot bellows came into use.

Bellows driven by foot or by water wheel proved a reliable compressor for more than 2,000 years. But as blast furnaces developed, so did the need for increased air compression. In 1762, John Smeaton built a water wheel-driven blowing cylinder that began to replace the bellows. Inventor John Wilkinson introduced an efficient blasting machine in England in 1776 and age of pneumatic energy became universally embraced.

Thus far, air compression was used mostly for the mining and the fabrication of metals. Blowing machines supplied a combustion blast to metallurgic furnaces and ventilation to underground mines. The idea of using compressed air to transmit energy became popular about 1800 when the newly invented pneumatic rock drill was used to connect Italy and France with an 8-mile rail tunnel under Mt. Cenis. This was a super feat for its time and garnered international interest spawning a flurry of inventions from air operated motors to clocks to beer dispensers.

Many engineers theorized compressed air as the energy distribution system of the future. However, electricity advocates held strong to their belief that pneumatic plants would eventually be trumped by electricity. Neither side was truly right and the debate still festers today. Much emphasis is being placed on energy conservation and the use of compressed air. The argument holds true today as it did back then, compressed air is a viable sources of transferring energy and will not go away. It’s prudent use of compressed air, as with any energy source, that is paramount.

Engine block blow off

The use of drilled or open pipe is energy wasteful. For 30 years EXAIR has been helping conserve compressed air with their engineered nozzles. These are designed to provide greater volumes of air than the volume of compressed air used which is a green alternative to drying, cooling, and blow off applications.

If you are interested in conserving your compressed air, one of our application engineers would be happy to assist you. Feel welcomed to give them a call at 1-800-903-9247 or click the chat icon in the upper left hand corner of this page.

Joe Panfalone
Application Engineer
Phone (513) 671-3322
Fax (513) 671-3363
Web: http://www.exair.com
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/exair_jp
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair